Mortgage stress test is helping fuel alternative lending boom report

first_img 5 Comments Join the conversation → Geoff Zochodne Reddit Comment Recommended For YouU.S. FDA approves Karyopharm Therapeutics’ blood cancer drugOntario Cannabis Store pulls affected CannTrust products amid Health Canada probeUPDATE 2-FDA approves expanded label for Regeneron/Sanofi’s DupixentTrump pick for Fed seat says doesn’t want to pull rug from under market -CNBCAP Explains: US sanctions on Huawei bite, but who gets hurt? What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Facebook Email Mortgage stress test is helping fuel alternative lending boom: report CIBC economist says regulators need to revisit rules that have made it harder to get a mortgage Regulators should reconsider a stress test for uninsured mortgages that was imposed amid an already slowing housing market and that has helped fuel an alternative-lending boom, a Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce economist said Tuesday.Since the stress test was brought in last January, the Bank of Canada has hiked its key interest rate by 75 basis points and the five-year mortgage rate has increased by 35 basis points, says Benjamin Tal, the deputy chief economist at CIBC World Markets.“Accordingly, regulators should revisit B-20,” Tal wrote in a report. “We need a more flexible benchmark, potentially a narrower spread over the contract rate when interest rates approach cyclical peak, and perhaps to establish a reasonable floor under which the qualifying rate will never drop below.” Mortgage stress test is keeping Toronto home buyers on sidelines, says real estate board The mortgage ‘stress test’ has started harming Canadians more than it helps OSFI under pressure by banks, industry lobbyists to ease mortgage stress test: sources Tal’s comments come as the housing market has cooled, but as some Canadians are still finding real estate out of their price range. In its budget last month, the federal government introduced a first-time homebuyer incentive program to try to give those would-be owners a hand.A softer housing market has also weighed on firms that do business in the sector. Canadian banks have seen their rate of mortgage originations slow and the real-estate industry has complained that the stress test has made it tougher for homebuyers to get a loan.On Monday, the Bank of Canada released its latest business outlook survey, which noted “continued weakness in housing-related activity in some regions.”“During 2018, growth in mortgage originations continued to decline,” Tal wrote. “The value of new mortgages fell by eight per cent (or $25 billion) during the year. Note, however, that the slowing in the pace of mortgage origination growth started well before B-20 was introduced.” The stress test was part of a revised guideline for residential mortgage underwriting, which was known as B-20. It sets out that the minimum qualifying rate on uninsured mortgages of whichever is higher: the Bank of Canada’s five-year benchmark rate or the rate on the contract plus 200 basis points. It also preceded a stress-test that was slapped on insured mortgages back in 2016.The Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions, which oversees federally regulated lenders, introduced the new stress test for uninsured mortgages. In February, an assistant superintendent defended the measure as prudent during a lunchtime speech in downtown Toronto, although they also suggested that the regulator could make changes if necessary.Tal said that the stress test was probably necessary when it was introduced, “since there was a need to save some Canadian borrowers from themselves.”“But is 200 basis points the right number?” he asked. “At the end of the day, there is no real science behind that number.”The economist added that the income of borrowers is likely to rise during their mortgage term and that the B-20 stress test does not consider decreasing borrower risk with a longer term.“And finally, B-20 is in part behind the strong rise in alternative lending,” Tal wrote.Based on information from the Ontario Land Registry, Tal wrote that alternative lenders now account for nearly 12 per cent of total real-estate transactions, and about 15 per cent of deals in the Greater Toronto Area.“A year ago, that number was close to 10 per cent, meaning that alternative lenders’ share has risen since the introduction of B-20,” Tal said. “Behind the scenes, there is a transfer of risk from the regulated to the less regulated segment of the market—from where there is light to where it’s dark. That was certainly not the intent of B-20, and any other mortgage-related change to regulations.”• Email: gzochodne@nationalpost.com | Twitter: center_img Twitter Sponsored By: Share this storyMortgage stress test is helping fuel alternative lending boom: report Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn advertisement April 16, 20194:01 PM EDT Filed under News FP Street The value of new mortgages fell 8% or $25 billion in 2018, though the decline began before the mortgage stress test started.Tyler Anderson/National Post ← Previous Next → Featured Stories Morelast_img read more

Kevin Carmichael Expert Panel on Sustainable Finance did the hard work now

first_img The three members of the Expert Panel on Sustainable Finance had already spent about 50 minutes talking about their 57-page, 15-recommendation, 34-sub-recommendation final report. Still, the moderator asked if any of them had anything else to say to the journalists on the call.“I just want to make sure people don’t see this as an environmental report,” said Barbara Zvan, chief risk and strategy officer at the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan. “It’s much more about the economy and about jobs.”Indeed. Bloomberg News reported on June 7 that the value of green assets under management last year was about US$31 trillion, a 34 per cent increase from 2016. That’s trillion with a “t,” in strong dollars. Converted to loonies, the figure is about $41 trillion at the current exchange rate. Real money. Joe Oliver: Canada is getting worryingly close to embracing economically destructive ‘sustainable finance’ Carbon taxers keep saying it’s a ‘conservative idea.’ Everything else says otherwise Trudeau’s ‘climate emergency’ meets his national muddle of malfunctioning carbon taxes And yet Zvan was worried that the painstaking work of four representatives of the financial elite — herself; the chair, Tiff Macklem, dean of the University of Toronto’s Rotman Business School; Andrew Chisholm, a member of Royal Bank of Canada’s board of directors; and Kim Thomassin, an executive at Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec — could be dismissed as, well, an environmental report.Can you blame her? There is a real risk that the people who will be running the country in 2019 won’t even read the committee’s report. When Macklem assembled his group 14 months ago, there appeared to be a consensus around what to do about climate change. Not now. The politicians with swagger these days are the ones who diminish green finance as a fad concocted by activists, Europeans and out-of-touch billionaires. Segments of the Canadian business establishment cling to an economy that made them rich, grumping about pipelines and taxes rather than investing in clean technology and green bonds.Andrew Scheer, who will be prime minister come November, according to 338Canada.com’s analysis of the latest polls, says he would remove the price on carbon. The expert panel endorsed the carbon tax and urged the federal government to clarify what the price will be beyond 2023 to remove uncertainty as a reason to hold back investment.Jason Kenney, the Alberta premier, accuses London-based HSBC Holdings Plc of “boycotting” the province by deciding it would no longer back oilsands development, when all it was doing was responding to the same forces that have allowed global portfolio managers to raise $41 trillion and counting. The expert panel indicated that it thinks some Canadians need to stop stomping their feet, accept where the world is headed, and take advantage of the opportunities in the shift away from carbon presents. “We can shape our future or risk the international community doing it for us,” the final report said.Closer to Zvan’s Bay Street neighbourhood, Joe Oliver, the former Conservative finance minister who now is chairman of Echelon Wealth Partners, a wealth management firm that promises its clients “unbiased investment solutions,” last month savaged the whole notion of sustainable finance as an attack on capitalism. Writing in the Financial Post, Oliver said the suggestion that companies have a fiduciary responsibility to disclose how climate change could affect profits “would undermine a fundamental underpinning of the market economy, with negative consequences for profitability capital formation, and wealth creation.”Oliver’s vitriol was inspired by the expert panel’s interim report. Macklem said that document and the new one should be read as two-volume set. The final report calls on Ottawa and the provinces to require companies to either disclose their exposure to climate change or explain why they are unaffected; the Finance Department to state clearly that executives have a fiduciary responsibility to make climate disclosures; and the federal banking regulator to issue guidance on how it expects financial institutions to protect themselves from climate-related risks.The expert panel … thinks some Canadians need to stop stomping their feet, accept where the world is headed, and take advantage of the opportunities Kevin Carmichael: Expert Panel on Sustainable Finance did the hard work, now it’s up to politicians to find consensus When the group started 14 months ago, there appeared to be a consensus around what to do about climate change. Not now ← Previous Next → What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation More Sponsored By: Featured Stories Share this storyKevin Carmichael: Expert Panel on Sustainable Finance did the hard work, now it’s up to politicians to find consensus Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Email Kevin Carmichael 6 Comments Recommended For YouC$ nears 8-month high ahead of Bank of Canada rate decisionCopper concentrates tightness threatens benchmark pricing: Andy HomeDubai’s big spenders tighten purse stringsRussia fines Google for failing to filter search resultsPhilly Fed’s regional business index hits one-year high Twitter Facebook Reddit Join the conversation → The response to the Macklem committee’s recommendations will tell us whether the Canadian political system has become too polarized to accomplish anything big. There is nothing in the report that Conservatives should oppose, assuming they are sincere when they say they want to do something about climate change. That includes the carbon tax, which is the cheapest, most efficient way to offset the various costs associated with consumption of fossil fuels. To be sure, they have whipped up so much anger over the policy, there will be no going back. But that needn’t stop them from incorporating much of the rest of the expert panel’s work into their own climate proposals.Macklem and the other panelists clearly put a lot of work into thinking about how an economy built on resources could lower greenhouse emissions without destroying a lot of wealth. Macklem, a former senior deputy governor at the Bank of Canada, said there would be global demand for oil for decades and that more pipeline capacity would be necessary to encourage oil companies to invest in technology and innovation that would lower emissions. The committee endorsed “transition bonds,” a variation of green bonds, which oil companies and miners could issue to pay for technology that would allow them to pollute less. But the panel’s support might not be enough. Macklem said Canadians will need to get involved in the discussions that will set the international standards for sustainable finance to ensure such assets make the list of what qualifies as green funding.The other idea that should bridge the partisan divide is allowing Canadians to lower their tax bills by investing in green assets. The expert panel proposes a “super deduction” of more than 100 per cent for every dollar invested as a way to marshal private funds to the cause of reversing climate change. The promise of a tax break could offset the reluctance of more traditional investors to spend their money on products they associate with charity. “If making money is primary, and doing good is secondary, then that should resonate,” said Raj Lala, chief executive of Toronto-based Evolve Funds Group Inc., a provider of exchange traded funds with about $500 million under management.And sustainable finance should resonate across the political spectrum. It’s not a fad, it’s a chance to make money while fighting an existential threat. Surely Conservatives and Liberals can find common cause around that.•Email: kcarmichael@postmedia.com | Twitter: CarmichaelKevin June 14, 20196:48 PM EDT Filed under News Economy Comment advertisement Tiff Macklem, dean of the University of Toronto’s Rotman Business School, says said there would be global demand for oil for decades and that more pipeline capacity would be necessary to encourage oil companies to invest in technology and innovation that would lower emissions.National Post file photo last_img read more

WatchTraders mull odds of policy error after Bank of Canada signals more

first_img January 11, 20193:12 PM EST Filed under News Economy Twitter Join the conversation → Facebook Comment 0 Comments Related Stories What’s in store for Canada’s economy, markets and politics Traders mull odds of policy error after Bank of Canada signals more hikes could come Speculation that past hikes have already gone too far Morecenter_img Bloomberg News Email The Bank of Canada’s insistence that more interest rate increases are still needed has strategists fretting about policy mistakes.Governor Stephen Poloz, speaking Wednesday in Ottawa, stuck to his view that further hikes could still be in store on the basis that an expected slowdown in economic growth, driven by slumping oil prices, will only be temporary.Yet it was a different concern flagged by central bank officials that’s casting the most doubt on those plans: weaker-than-expected consumption and housing figures are adding to speculation past hikes have already gone too far.“The Bank of Canada has hiked and will continue to hike into a more pronounced slowdown than the U.S.,” said Frances Donald, head of macroeconomic strategy at Manulife Asset Management. “It’s worth considering playing a policy mistake here in the bond market.” As bankruptcies rise, BoC’s Poloz says he’s listening to people’s concerns about higher interest rates Bank of Canada holds interest rate as oil slump dims economy’s outlook Stephen Poloz’s dashboard: The latest charts that matter most to the Bank of Canada The central bank’s five interest rate increases since 2017, as well as a variety of changes to mortgage rules from regulators and different levels of government, are taking a surprisingly large toll on housing.Residential investment has subtracted from growth for three consecutive quarters. Home sales in the Toronto region fell 16 per cent in 2018, while in Vancouver they plunged 32 per cent. Recent weakness in oil prices, meanwhile, could have spillover effects on the real estate markets in energy producing regions.The central bank revised down its expectations for the sector, which it now expects to shrink in 2019 after previously forecasting a small gain.Softness in interest-rate sensitive segments of the economy goes beyond housing. Spending on durable goods also dragged on third quarter growth. Auto sales fell on an annual basis for the first time since 2009, and analysts expect another retreat in 2019. The Bank of Canada revised consumption down, and now projects it to add just 1 percentage point to growth this year, which would be its weakest contribution since the 2009 recession.The Bank of Canada’s “entire chop” to projected 2019 growth — from 2.1 per cent to 1.7 per cent — is attributable to lower domestic demand, Bank of Montreal’s Chief Economist Douglas Porter said Wednesday.‘Over-Tightened’All this talk of more rate increases suggests policy makers may not fully appreciate the impact they’re having on the economy, according to David Rosenberg, chief economist at Gluskin Sheff + Associates. “The bank has over-tightened as it is,” Rosenberg said Wednesday on BNN Bloomberg, adding he believes the hiking cycle has come to an end and it wouldn’t surprise him if the next move was a cut.To be sure, the central bank is clearly aware of the issue, acknowledging Wednesday the economy may be more sensitive to higher rates than initially thought. It seems to be in no rush to hike, and it elevated developments in the nation’s housing market to one of the three key factors that will determine the pace of policy normalization after data showed it “slowed markedly.” That’s a shift from December, when Poloz described housing as “stabilizing.” It also stressed that any future move would be entirely data dependent.Still, the Bank of Canada estimates neutral rates of interest are somewhere between 2.5 per cent to 3.5 per cent, which implies at least three more hikes from the current 1.75 per cent policy rate. But markets don’t see Poloz even getting within 50 basis points of the midpoint of that range within the next five years, according to the overnight index swaps curve.There are too many unknowns about how the housing market will react to the cocktail of measures working to slow it down, said George Pearkes, chief macro strategist at Bespoke Investment Group.“When it’s all combined with high prices at the same time, prudence is certainly warranted,” Pearkes said.With assistance from Eric LamBloomberg.com Reddit World’s biggest money manager expects Bank of Canada to hit the brakes in 2019 More people are going broke in Canada as interest rates rise Share this storyTraders mull odds of policy error after Bank of Canada signals more hikes could come Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Luke Kawa last_img read more

There Are Now 23000 Public Charging Points In France

Plug-In Electric Car Sales In France Exceed 32,000 In 2018 There is now over 10,000 places to charge in France.The number of public charging points in France increased within a year by some 14.8% to 23,019, installed at 10,060 sites.The increase of just 3,000 compared to 20,000 in September 2017 doesn’t sound encouraging, especially when there was hope for 100,000 by the end of 2020.More from France Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 24, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Source: Electric Vehicle News Renault And PSA Gear Up To Replace Autolib Car Sharing In Paris 200 Corri-Door Fast Chargers Used 8,850 Times In July-August Currently, there are around 6.5 electric cars per one public charging point in France. Only several percent of those charging points are DC fast chargers:roughly half is below 20 kWalmost half is between 20-45 kW6% are above 45 kW (DC fast chargers)The reasons behind the relatively slow pickup of charging infrastructure is that BEV sales didn’t grow fast (just +16% in the first eight months). The other thing is the death of Autolib, which also absorbed some of the charging infrastructure.The third reason is low revenues from commercial charging networks – just see the example of 200 Corri-Door fast chargers along major routes.23,000 Charging Points In France – September 2018 (source: L’Avere-France)source: L’Avere-France read more

Aston Martin to offer electric conversions of classic cars

first_imgAston Martin wants to take advantage of the growing interest in classic cars and combine it with their electrification effort to offer electric conversions of classic cars. more…The post Aston Martin to offer electric conversions of classic cars appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Formula Es new race season starts this weekend with muchimproved Gen 2

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Electric cars have been finding their way into racing success the last few years, and the biggest game in town is Formula E, the FIA’s all-electric open-wheel racing series.  The series’ 5th season starts this weekend with the Ad Diriyah ePrix in Saudi Arabia.The new season brings new tracks, new teams, new drivers, new rules, and most importantly: a new car which is capable of much more than last season’s. more…The post Formula E’s new race season starts this weekend, with much-improved Gen 2 car appeared first on Electrek.last_img

Tesla is facing another unionization effort this time at Gigafactory 2

first_imgFor the past few years, Tesla has been facing a unionization effort at Fremont factory and now they are facing another one as workers at Gigafactory 2 in Buffalo started a new campaign to unionize the solar factory. more…The post Tesla is facing another unionization effort, this time at Gigafactory 2 appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Volkswagen ID Orders In Europe With TeslaStyle Deposits

first_img With Chattanooga, VW Will Have 8 Plants For EVs Based On MEB Volkswagen will go the electric Tesla way.According to the latest news, the introduction of the upcoming Volkswagen I.D. in Europe will be preceded by the launch of a new order system requiring small deposits in a Tesla-like style.In such a way, Volkswagen will be able to get knowledge about the real demand and prioritize customers who placed deposits, before cars will be widely available in showrooms.Volkswagen I.D. Volkswagen I.D. Hatch Rendered To Life Volkswagen I.D. Hatchback First Drive By Fully Charged: Video VW’s Norwegian team believes that customers in Norway alone will place some 10,000 pre-orders.The production of I.D. hatchback for Europe should start in November 2019, while the market launch will begin in early 2020.It’s not yet clear whether a similar system will be utilized in the U.S. for I.D. CROZZ, when it hits the market in 2020 at earliest.Source: Automotive News Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 18, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Musk Hints Tesla Pickup Truck Will Make Ram Seem Puny

first_img New Rivian R1T Pickup Truck Renders Show Camper, Flatbed & More First, his words: It’s not a secret that Tesla is working on an electric pickup truck. In fact, it’s scheduled to be revealed sometime later this year. As for its towing/hauling abilities, both are still up in the air. However, we do know that the expectations are high…very high.The truck will be a dual-motor, all-wheel-drive pickup with “crazy torque & a suspension that dynamically adjusts for load. Those will be standard,” noted Musk in a previous tweet. We suspect that whatever a Ram 1500 or Ford F-150 can do, Tesla will one-up those figures.We’ll find out the actual info in detail later this year when Tesla reveals its much-anticipated electric truck. More Trucks Ford F-150 Electric Pickup Truck Spotted In Swirly Camo 12,000 lbs!? How puny. Do you construct children’s toys?Of course, we need some context here to explain what Musk is referring to, so here’s the tweet embedded in full:12,000 lbs!? How puny. Do you construct children’s toys?— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) March 26, 2019center_img Is that for hauling children’s toys?Has Elon Musk just suggested that a Tesla pickup truck will outhaul one of the mighty Ram trucks? That sure seems to be what he’s implying in a recent tweet. Source: Electric Vehicle News New Tesla Electric Pickup Render Is Bold, Reminds Us Of Ram Truck Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 31, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Fortum solution recycles 80 of Liion battery material

first_imgA new solution from Fortum, a Finnish clean-energy company, increases the amount of material in Li-ion batteries that can be recycled to more than 80%, according to the company. The current EU-mandated recycling rate is only 50% of the total weight of the battery.First the company makes the used batteries safe for mechanical treatment, directing plastics, aluminium and copper  to their own recycling processes. Then it uses an industrial-scale, low-CO2 hydrometallurgical process to recover cobalt, manganese and nickel from the battery.The chemical and mineral components of a battery form a ‘black mass’ that typically consists of a mixture of lithium, manganese, cobalt and nickel in different ratios. Of these, nickel and cobalt are the most valuable and most difficult to recover.Fortum uses a recovery process that involves a chemical precipitation methodology that allows these minerals to be recovered and delivered to battery manufacturers for reuse in the production of new batteries. The technology was developed by Crisolteq, which has a hydrometallurgical recycling facility in Harjavalta, Finland, where the black mass can be treated on an industrial scale.“There are very few working, economically viable technologies for recycling the majority of materials in lithium-ion batteries,” said Kalle Saarimaa, Vice President, Fortum Recycling and Waste. “We saw a challenge that was not yet solved and developed a scalable recycling solution for all industries using batteries.” Source: Fortum via Green Car Congress Source: Electric Vehicles Magazinelast_img read more

Toshiba launches dieselbattery hybrid shunting and shortline locomotive

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicles Magazine Toshiba Managing Director Sei Shigeoka said, “The demand for new environment-friendly technologies in rail freight transport is increasing. We are delighted to present our latest hybrid shunting locomotive jointly developed by European and Japanese engineering talents.”Source: Toshiba via Green Car Congress Toshiba subsidiary Kiel-Toshiba Railway Europe unveiled its first European hybrid shunting and short-line locomotive. The company showcased the HDB 800 locomotive demonstrator in its pantograph version alongside other modular diesel-electric hybrid locomotives at a recent trade show.The new HDB 800 has the following features:Series hybrid system consisting of two diesel engines and the SCiB Li-ion battery systemHigh-efficiency permanent magnet synchronous motorOptional catenary operation via pantographThe SCiB is the first rechargeable Li-ion battery recognized as compliant with the SIL4 safety integrity level (less than 1×10-8 probability of failure per hour) of the European Norm 50126 standards for rolling stock, according to Toshiba.last_img read more

Triathlete dies after New York swim

first_imgTriathlon Triathlete dies after New York swim Support The Guardian Share on Twitter First published on Mon 21 Jul 2008 19.10 EDT Share on Facebook Share via Email Mon 21 Jul 2008 19.10 EDTcenter_img A 32-year-old man died during the New York City competition on Sunday, the first death in the eight years of the event. Other competitors raised the alarm during the 1500m swim in the Hudson river and he was unconscious when he was pulled from the water just before 8am. The men’s and women’s races were both won by Australians, Greg Bennett in 1hr 46min 31sec and Liz Blatchford in 1hr 58min 35sec. AP Topics Since you’re here… … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Shares00 Triathlonlast_img read more

On Veterans Day Two Lawyers View Their Service Past and Present

first_imgIn 2016, Gulf War Era veterans began to outnumber those of the Vietnam Era, putting Texas on an arc to become home for more veterans than any other state. On this Veterans Day, here are two lawyers who are part of that trend. And one of them officially becomes a lawyer today . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Remember me Username Passwordcenter_img Lost your password? Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img

New AAD PSA uses social media imagery to highlight tanning hazards

first_imgMay 23 2018As Memorial Day signals the unofficial start of summer, many teen girls will be eager to get out of school and spend time outside -; and some may want to get a tan. But a new public service advertisement from the American Academy of Dermatology encourages those who are thinking of tanning to think again.Released in conjunction with Skin Cancer Awareness Month in May, the new AAD PSA “Protect Yourselfie” uses social media imagery to remind teenage girls that tanning could lead to skin cancer and premature aging, and encourages them to protect their skin from harmful ultraviolet rays. Melanoma is the second most common cancer in young women ages 15-29, and research suggests that the majority of melanoma cases are attributable to UV exposure from the sun and indoor tanning beds.Related StoriesGW researchers underscore need for tailored skin cancer prevention programsLoose double-stranded RNA molecules spur skin rejuvenationTopical cream found to be effective in reversing the effects of vitiligo”We hope this PSA reminds young women that tanning is dangerous -; and potentially deadly,” says board-certified dermatologist Suzanne M. Olbricht, MD, FAAD, president of the AAD. “Every time you tan, including trying to get a base tan, you increase your risk of developing skin cancer, including melanoma, which kills one person every hour. On top of that, UV rays can make your skin age prematurely, leading to wrinkles and age spots. Don’t try to change your skin by tanning; keep it safe by protecting yourself from harmful UV exposure.”During Skin Cancer Awareness Month, the AAD is recognizing “Skin Cancer Heroes” -; patients and survivors, the friends and loved ones who have helped and supported them, and the board-certified dermatologists who have detected and treated their skin cancer. The AAD encourages everyone, including young women, to be their own Skin Cancer Heroes by taking steps to prevent skin cancer: staying out of indoor tanning beds, and protecting themselves from the sun by seeking shade, wearing protective clothing, and using a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher.Source: https://www.aad.org/media/news-releases/protect-your-selfie-psalast_img read more

New Infinixi DualPlane system at Slidell Memorial Hospital supports a range of

first_img Source:http://slidellmemorial.org/ Jul 26 2018Clinicians at Slidell Memorial Hospital in Slidell, Louisiana now have access to advanced diagnostic imaging to help them maximize flexibility, minimize exposure and optimize image quality during interventional procedures thanks to the recent installation of Canon Medical’s InfinixTM-i Dual-Plane system. Slidell Memorial Hospital is using the Infinix-i Dual-Plane for a variety of procedures, including coronary and peripheral vascular interventional procedures, like lower extremity angiograms.The Infinix-i Dual-Plane offers unmatched versatility for performing cardiac and vascular procedures in the same room. The system also delivers high-quality imaging and includes two different panel options—an 8×8 cardiac panel and a 12×16 peripheral panel—so that physicians can achieve the angles they need for the images they want. Exclusive, advanced software applications enable clinicians to maximize system capabilities for performing a wide range of procedures with confidence and precision.Related StoriesNew system for precise navigation through the vascular systemStudy: Two-thirds of pneumonia patients receive more antibiotics than they probably needIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new study”The Infinix-i Dual-Plane system enable our shared lab to perform peripheral and cardiac procedures in the same room without compromising quality,” said Dr. Vasanth Bethala, medical director and chairman of cardiology, Slidell Memorial Hospital. “The system has a large field of view with high-quality, fast image capture, which means I can get the images I need for peripheral interventions with fewer contrast injections. And for coronary interventions, I am able to capture high-quality images which allow me to see smaller vessels in greater detail.”Based on a design commitment to delivering the highest possible image quality at the lowest possible dose, the system incorporates industry-leading dose management tools.”We designed the Infinix-i Dual-Plane as an imaging solution to address our customers’ need for flexibility. With a customizable setup and two dedicated C-arms, the system delivers superb versatility, without sacrificing quality,” said Satrajit Misra, vice president, Marketing and Strategic Development, Canon Medical Systems USA, Inc.The Infinix-i Dual-Plane system is part of the opening of Slidell’s third cath lab, which has been designed for the best possible patient experience. In addition to the Infinix-i Dual-Plane, the lab features specialized mood lighting and music to help calm patients undergoing procedures and testing in the room. This May, Slidell Memorial Hospital, recognized for their patient-centered culture, brought together community leaders to celebrate the installation of the Infinix™-i Dual-Plane from Canon Medical Systems USA, Inc. for a special ribbon cutting ceremony to mark the occasion.last_img read more

Karolinska releases English translation of misconduct report on trachea surgeon

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The Karolinska Institute in Stockholm today released its English translation of a report critical of surgeon Paolo Macchiarini, famous for transplanting tissue-engineered tracheae into more than a dozen people. The report concludes that Macchiarini committed scientific misconduct in publications describing the results of several of the transplants. Karolinska, where Macchiarini is a visiting professor, commissioned the external inquiry after allegations arose in August 2014.The investigator, Bengt Gerdin, professor emeritus of surgery at Uppsala University, examined six papers about the patients and one on animal tests of the procedure and found multiple problems that he deemed serious enough to constitute misconduct, including inaccurate descriptions of the condition of patients at the time of publication and stating that ethical permission had been obtained for the work although there is none on record. The report, submitted to the Karolinska vice chancellor on 13 May, concludes that Macchiarini “bears the main responsibility for the publication of false or incomplete information in several papers, and is therefore guilty of scientific misconduct.”Macchiarini has disputed the allegations, but he told ScienceInsider that he could not comment further until Karolinska Vice Chancellor Anders Hamsten issues his decision on the case. That is expected sometime in June. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Email Macchiarini and his colleagues attracted widespread attention by developing a technique intended to help patients whose tracheae were badly damaged by cancer, injury, or birth defects. They designed a polymer scaffold, which is seeded with the patient’s stem cells to construct a replacement trachea. The stem cells are supposed to grow over the scaffold and eventually develop into a living organ.Misconduct allegedThe allegations of misconduct came from four researchers at the Karolinska Institute and the affiliated Karolinska University Hospital, where three transplants took place. The four critics—who co-authored several of the controversial papers—say they became concerned in the fall of 2013 when they learned of serious complications in the first patient to receive an artificial trachea at Karolinska. (They say they were not involved in the care of that patient after the initial surgery in 2011. He was treated at a hospital at Karolinska’s Huddinge campus, 25 kilometers from the critics’ primary location in Solna.) When they looked into the case records of the patients operated on at Karolinska, they concluded that the papers failed to mention the serious complications the patients had suffered, and ultimately asked Karolinska to investigate.In particular dispute is a paper published in December 2011 in The Lancet. It claims that, 5 months after surgery, the recipient, a 36-year-old graduate student, had no complications and the graft was showing early signs of tissue growth. However, there are no clinical records of the patient’s status 5 months after surgery, Gerdin points out; the available clinical data in the records were from August, 11 weeks after surgery. In November, several weeks after the paper was accepted but before it was published, the patient was readmitted to Karolinska with complications that ultimately required a stent to keep his airway open. The engineered trachea had significant problems, the critics say in their complaint, but Macchiarini did not notify The Lancet. Nor did he mention the complications in a Lancet review paper published 3 months later. That paper says that the graft was in good condition 8 months after surgery.Allegations disputedIn his initial written response to the accusations, Macchiarini denied any misrepresentation. Philipp Jungebluth, an assistant professor at Karolinska who was recruited with Macchiarini as a postdoctoral researcher, also maintains that all the papers in question are accurate. Both he and Macchiarini say that the complications that arose after the paper was accepted were not relevant, because the article was intended to provide a clinical snapshot. Jungebluth says that despite the complications, the patient did well for at least a year after his initial surgery. He finished his studies and had a second child after the transplant, Jungebluth notes. All the patients who received artificial tracheae were complex medical cases who had no other options, he says, and post-transplant complications were to be expected.The four physicians who reported concerns about Macchiarini also alleged that he did not get proper authorization from an ethics review board for the surgeries and failed to get informed consent from the patients. Such issues fall under Swedish health care law rather than scientific misconduct regulations, Gerdin says, so his report did not pass final judgment on those allegations. The Swedish Medical Products Agency referred the case to a prosecutor earlier this month.Second investigationA separate investigation by Karolinska’s ethics council into allegations of misconduct brought by Pierre Delaere, a surgeon at UZ Leuven in Belgium, was completed in April. Delaere, who has developed a different method for replacing a damaged trachea, has long criticized Macchiarini’s work, saying that his papers do not reflect the true condition of the trachea recipients. The ethics council report concluded that Delaere’s complaints were either due to a difference of opinion or were too vague to be substantiated. Gerdin says he does not disagree with that report. The allegations brought by the Karolinska researchers were more concrete, Gerdin says, and addressed specific discrepancies between patient records and published papers.Gerdin’s report says Macchiarini bears the primary responsibility for the misconduct. However, he also faults the Karolinska Institute for failing to anticipate that Macchiarini’s surgeries would need clear ethical oversight and the co-authors for signing off on papers that were inaccurate.Macchiarini and the researchers who brought the complaints have 2 weeks to comment on Gerdin’s findings. Vice Chancellor Hamsten will then decide what action to take, a Karolinska representative says.last_img read more

Podcast 400yearold sharks busting a famous scientific hoax and clinical trials in

first_imgNews stories on using pets in clinical trials to test veterinarian drugs, debunking the Piltdown Man once and for all, and deciding just how smart crows can be, with David Grimm.   From the magazine It’s really difficult to figure out how old a free-living animal is. Maybe you can find growth rings in bone or other calcified body parts, but in sharks like the Greenland shark, no such hardened parts exist. Using two different radiocarbon dating approaches, Julius Neilsen and colleagues discovered that the giant Greenland shark may live as long as 400 years.   Read the research.   [Image: James Howard McGregor/Wikimedia Commons/Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img

Obamas wetlands protection rule put too much emphasis on science Trump officials

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Snak Shak/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0) Obama’s wetlands protection rule put ‘too much emphasis’ on science, Trump officials argue It’s baffling for a science-based agency to say that they relied too much on science. How the U.S. government should regulate small, isolated wetlands, such as this prairie pothole, has long been the subject of controversy. Daren Bakst Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Read more… Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The agencies need to worry primarily about the statute and the Constitution, not what the report said. Science informs policymakers, it does not give us an answer to policy questions. Ken Kopocis Originally published by E&E NewsPresident Donald Trump’s administration is faulting its predecessor for overemphasizing science in writing a 2015 Clean Water Act rule aimed at defining what isolated wetlands and waterways deserve automatic federal regulatory protection.At issue: the Obama-era Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Army Corps of Engineers’ 400-page review of research on how wetlands and small streams affect downstream rivers, lakes and estuaries. “It’s baffling for a science-based agency to say that they relied too much on science,” said Ken Kopocis, who led the Obama EPA’s Office of Water.Said Betsy Southerland, who resigned last year from her post leading the water office’s Office of Science and Technology: “EPA has always relied on both science and the law in developing regulations. However, when the statute and case law are as ambiguous as they are regarding Waters of the U.S., EPA must rely on science to provide the clarity missing from the law in order to avoid an arbitrary and capricious determination.”The question of what wetlands and small waterways should be covered by the Clean Water Act has a famously muddled history.The Clean Water Act itself says it should apply to “navigable waters of the United States,” which it defines only as “waters of the United States.”The Supreme Court has attempted to decide what that phrase means in three separate cases, the most recent of which — Rapanos v. United States in 2006 — ended in an infamous 4-1-4 split decision.The Obama Clean Water Rule was based on Justice Anthony Kennedy’s stand-alone opinion in Rapanos. He wrote that wetlands and waterways should be afforded federal protection if they have a chemical, biological or hydrological connection — what he called a “significant nexus” — to downstream waters.He also wrote that individual wetlands should be federally protected if they, “alone or in combination with similarly situated lands in the region, significantly affect the chemical, physical and biological integrity of other covered waters.”With the Obama-era Connectivity Report, the Clean Water Rule applied Kennedy’s reasoning to “isolated wetlands” like prairie potholes, Delmarva and Carolina bays, pocosins, vernal pools in California, and Texas coastal prairie wetlands (Greenwire, 2 October, 2017).It said those wetlands should be considered on a case-by-case basis but also as a system, with regulators assessing the importance of an individual pothole on its own and also as part of the ecosystem, determining the impact on downstream waters in combination with other prairie potholes in the watershed.Waters within the 100-year floodplain or within 4,000 feet of the high tide line would be treated similarly under the Obama approach.Now the Trump administration says that approach is “an expansive reading” of Kennedy’s opinion.The Army Corps and EPA say the regulation “does not give sufficient effect to the term ‘navigable'” in the Clean Water Act, relying too much on the Connectivity Report instead.The agencies also say the Clean Water Rule did not put enough weight on one part of the Clean Water Act preamble, which says states and tribes should retain authority over their land and water resources.’This is unique’Daren Bakst, senior research fellow in agricultural policy at the conservative Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C., agrees with the Trump administration’s approach.”The agencies need to worry primarily about the statute and the Constitution, not what the report said,” he said. “Science informs policymakers, it does not give us an answer to policy questions.”That argument could be convincing to a judge, said Larry Liebesman, a former Department of Justice attorney who’s now a senior adviser with the Washington, D.C.-based water resources firm Dawson & Associates.Liebesman notes the question of Clean Water Act jurisdiction is more complicated than other areas of environmental law where science is more obviously weighted heavily. Email By Ariel Wittenberg, E&E NewsJul. 5, 2018 , 11:11 AM As it proposes to repeal the Clean Water Rule, or Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS), regulation, the Trump-led agencies say the previous administration gave too much weight to the “Connectivity Report.””The agencies now believe that they previously placed too much emphasis on the information and conclusions of the Connectivity Report when setting jurisdictional lines in the 2015 Rule, relying on its environmental conclusions in place of interpreting the statutory text and other indicia of Congressional intent to ensure that the agencies’ regulations comport with their statutory authority to regulate,” the proposed repeal says.The Trump administration instead says EPA and the Army Corps should put more weight on the legal history of the Clean Water Rule.Former EPA officials say the Trump administration approach is a head-scratcher. “This is unique. It isn’t a standard for contaminants in drinking water where you only are considering scientific principles,” he said. “This is rule that creates a legal definition, so you’re wrapping science into this process that also includes case law, history and cooperative federalism.”But even as the Trump administration’s proposal argues too much weight was placed on the Connectivity Report, it also argues the Obama administration didn’t follow that report closely enough.EPA and the Army Corps “are concerned,” the Trump proposal says, that the Clean Water Rule’s treatment of “similarly situated” waters “may not be explainable by the scientific literature, including the Connectivity Report.”Pat Parenteau, a professor at the Vermont Law School in South Royalton, says the Clean Water Rule itself acknowledges what the Trump agencies say in its preamble, which notes that while the report described a “continuum” of connectivity where wetlands could have significant or minuscule impacts on downstream waters, “the science does not provide a precise point along the continuum” where a “significant nexus” begins or ends.Parenteau argues that the biggest flaw of the proposed repeal isn’t that it accuses the Obama administration of putting too much weight in science but that the Trump administration doesn’t explain how science should fit into the question of Clean Water Act jurisdiction.”I don’t see them saying, ‘Here is an appropriate way to balance questions of science and law,'” he said.Reprinted from Greenwire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2018. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.netlast_img read more

Just thinking you have poor endurance genes changes your body

first_imgSimply telling people they had a gene that lowers exercise ability made them perform worse on a treadmill. A week later, the participants were given a result, based not on their actual data, but rather on one of two groups into which they had been randomly placed. Some were told they had the form of a gene called CREB1 that makes a person tire easily; others were told they had the high-endurance version. Then they ran on the treadmill again.This time, those who had been told they had the low-endurance version of CREB1 did worse on the test, even if they had the other variant. Compared with their results on the first test, on average their bodies removed toxic carbon dioxide less efficiently, their lung capacity dropped, and they stopped running 22 seconds sooner, the team reports today in Nature Human Behavior. And those who thought they had the high-endurance form of the CREB1 gene ran slightly longer on average before feeling hot and tired, regardless of what gene variant they had. “Simply giving people this information changed their physiology,” Turnwald says.The team also tested a second group of 107 people for its version of FTO, a gene that influences how full we feel after eating. Some versions can also predispose people to obesity. Participants ate a small meal and rated their fullness. After being told, at random, that they had a version of FTO that made them hungrier than average or one that made them easily sated, participants ate the same meal. Those told they had the “hungry” version of the gene didn’t feel any different. But those who were told they had the other version felt less hungry on average after eating; they also had higher blood levels of a hormone that indicates a feeling of fullness.In the cases of both genes, some of the changes in bodily reactions were larger than what the researchers measured between people who actually carried different versions of the genes, suggesting their attitude could change their risk as much or more than their genetics. “What people haven’t fully appreciated is that that information also puts you into a mindset: ‘I’m at high risk or I’m protected,’” Crum says. “And that alone can have potent effects on physiology and motivation.”Such a placebo response to genetic information could have serious implications for genetic testing, especially commercially available products that can reveal risk scores for conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease and cancer. The Stanford team says people shouldn’t necessarily stop getting tested. But they—along with medical providers and genetic counselors—should keep in mind that just knowing about risk can subtly influence outcomes. The results suggest that if a person just thinks they are at high risk for, say, obesity, it could change their physiology in a way that makes them more prone to the condition, Turnwald says.The next question is whether these effects fade quickly, or last for years. Just thinking you have poor endurance genes changes your body iStock.com/BraunS If you want to win a race or stick to a difficult diet, coaches of all kinds will tell you it’s all about “mind over matter.” But that advice rarely crosses over into the medical community, where an inborn ability—or risk—is thought to depend more on genes and environment than on mindset. Now, in a study examining what may be a novel form of the placebo response, psychologists have found that just telling a person they have a high or low genetic risk for certain physical traits can influence how their body functions when exercising or eating, regardless of what genetic variant they actually have.The results could be an eye-opener for medical providers and consumer DNA testing companies. “From a psychological science perspective, it’s not terribly surprising that genetic risk information can function this way,” says behavioral researcher Susan Persky of the National Human Genome Research Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, who was not involved in the study. But it’s a novel idea in the genetics community, she adds.After getting ethics approval to conduct an experiment that involved deceiving participants, graduate student Bradley Turnwald and co-workers in the lab of psychologist Alia Crum at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, recruited 116 young and middle-aged people for what they called a “personalized medicine study.” They tested each for a gene variant that influences a person’s capacity for exercise. The volunteers also took a treadmill test. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img By Jocelyn KaiserDec. 10, 2018 , 3:05 PM Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Lee Daniels Embarrassed That He Supported Jussie Smollett

first_imgHe said that he would have never suspected Smollett to allegedly stage a hate crime and when asked if he believes there is doubt, Daniels explained, “Of course, there’s some doubt. I’m telling you that because I love him so much. That’s the torture that I’m in right now, because it’s literally if it were to happen to your son and your child, how would you feel? You would feel, Please, God, please let there be that glimmer of hope that there is some truth in this story. That’s why it’s been so painful. It was a flood of pain.”He also said, “We weren’t there. I can’t judge him. That’s only for the fucking lady or man with that black robe and God. I had to detach myself and stop calling him, because it was taking away the time I have for my kids, the time I have for my partner. It was affecting my spirit and other shows, everything.”Smollett’s career has taken a serious below. He is no longer being considered to play the lead role in the Broadway revival of “Take Me Out,” which is about a mixed-race baseball player. The role went to Jesse Williams. Considering what Daniels said, it appears Jussie may never return to “Empire.” He also wrote in a June 4 tweet, “Jussie will NOT be returning to Empire.”On Jan. 29, while walking to a subway, Smollett claimed two men yelled racial and homophobic slurs at him, investigators told The Hollywood Reporter. They allegedly punched and poured bleach on him while one of the suspects put a rope around his neck. As they fled the scene, Smollett told police they said, “This is MAGA country.” A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist Senate Policy Luncheons If you thought there might be a chance of Jussie Smollett returning to Lee Daniels’ “Empire,” those days are are over. The director spoke out about accusations that Smollett staged a hoax and he held nothing back.See Also: Complete Timeline Of Jussie Smollett InvestigationIn an interview with Vulture, Daniels was asked if he was embarrassed that he public supported Jussie Smollett, “I’m beyond embarrassed. I think that when it happened, I had a flash of me running from bullies. I had a flash of my whole life, of my childhood, my youth, getting beaten.” Chicago Police Department , Hate Crime , Homophobic , Jussie Smollett , MAGA , racist attack center_img More By NewsOne Staff Smollett has maintained his innocence and all 16 felony counts against him were dropped.SEE ALSO:Kamala Harris Leads Senate To Finally Passing Anti-Lynching BillWTH? ‘Black Panther’ Writer Roxane Gay Was Not Invited To The Movie PremiereCan Racial Profiling Be Stopped? A Federal Jury Sides With The Louisiana State Police Twitter Reacts To Sen. Kamala Harris Announcing Her Run For President Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Familylast_img read more