Lineker sarcastically wishes club ‘good luck’ in finding sacked Poch

first_imgLineker, who scored 80 goals for Spurs and won the 1991 FA Cup, wrote on Twitter: “Mauricio Pochettino has been sacked by Spurs.”He helped the club to punch massively above their weight for years.”Good luck with finding a better replacement… ain’t gonna happen.”Pochettino, 47, had been in charge in north London for five-and-a-half years.He leaves the club sitting 14th in the Premier League after an awful run of form, winning just three of 12 games this season.But Pochettino led the club to their first Champions League final only six months ago and has had the club challenging for the title in recent seasons.In a statement on the website, chairman Daniel Levy said: “We were extremely reluctant to make this change and it is not a decision the Board has taken lightly, nor in haste.“Regrettably domestic results at the end of last season and beginning of this season have been extremely disappointing.“It falls to the Board to make the difficult decisions – this one made more so given the many memorable moments we have had with Mauricio and his coaching staff – but we do so in the Club’s best interests. TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR legend Gary Lineker has sarcastically wished the club good luck in their search to replace Mauricio Pochettino.Spurs shockingly sacked the Argentinian just SIX MONTHS after he took them to the Champions League final.2 Spurs have sacked Pochettino – and Gary Lineker is not impressedMauricio Pochettino has been sacked by @SpursOfficial. He helped the club to punch massively above their weight for years. Good luck with finding a better replacement….ain’t gonna happen.— Gary Lineker (@GaryLineker) November 19, 2019 2 Lineker, right, won the 1991 FA Cup with SpursCredit: Getty – ContributorMOST READ IN FOOTBALLTHROUGH ITRobbie Keane reveals Claudine’s father was ’50-50′ in coronavirus battleTOP SELLERGavin Whelan has gone from League of Ireland to David Beckham’s InstagramExclusiveRIYAD RAIDMan City’s Riyad Mahrez has three luxury watches stolen in £500,000 raidPicturedAN EYEFULMeet Playboy model and football agent Anamaria Prodan bidding to buy her own clubI SAW ROORodallega saw Rooney ‘drinking like madman’ & Gerrard ‘on bar dancing shirtless’NEXT STEPJonny Hayes set to move to English Championship having been let go by CelticREF RELEASEDChampions League ref Vincic released by cops after arrest in prostitution raidKEANE DEALEx Man United youth ace David Jones says Roy Keane negotiated a contract for him“Mauricio and his coaching staff will always be part of our history. I have the utmost admiration for the manner in which he dealt with the difficult times away from a home ground whilst we built the new stadium and for the warmth and positivity he brought to us.”I should like to thank him and his coaching staff for all they have contributed. They will always be welcome here.“We have a talented squad. We need to re-energise and look to deliver a positive season for our supporters.”last_img read more

New expanded format for 2017 OFC Champions League

first_imgFor the past two years the competition has been hosted in a single venue but that is set to change in 2017 after the OFC Executive Committee approved a format that will split the competition into four stages.Stage 1 will be the Preliminary Competition for the national league champions of American Samoa, Cook Islands, Samoa and Tonga which will open the competition calendar in 2017.For the first time two teams from this competition will progress to Stage 2, the Group Stage of the OFC Champions League, both the preliminary winner and the runner-up.In another first for the competition, Stage 2 will be contested by 16 teams – two each from Fiji, Solomon Islands, Tahiti, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu – which will be drawn into four groups, each one hosted in a different venue.A round-robin league system will be adopted to determine the top team in each group, the four teams will progress to Stage 3, or the semi-finals.A draw will be held involving the four qualified teams to determine their respective opponents for the home-and-away semi-final with the winners progressing to the fourth and final stage.The two match home-and-away final will determine the winner of the 2017 OFC Champions League and the OFC representative at the FIFA Club World Cup 2017.Additional Information:The OFC Champions League is the Confederation’s premier international club competition and brings together the top teams from around the Pacific to compete for the crown of regional club champion.The 2017 tournament will be the 15th edition of this prestigious event which offers a much coveted prize – qualification to the FIFA Club World Cup.Defending champions Auckland City FC will be chasing their ninth regional title, in a competition that has largely been dominated by themselves and Waitakere United.Papua New Guinea club Hekari United became the first club outside of New Zealand or Australia to claim the prize with their 2010 victory, while Sydney FC, Wollongong Wolves and South Melbourne also have their place in the history books. Photo:OFClast_img read more

Lennon handles fame and confused cabbies

first_imgSean Lennon is accustomed to people recognizing him because of his famous parents, but one incident really caught him off guard. “When I was 15, a cabdriver asked me if I was Paul McCartney’s daughter,” the 31-year-old singer told AP Radio in a recent interview. Lennon said he usually finds himself unfazed by all the attention he gets as the son of Yoko Ono and former Beatle John Lennon, who was killed in New York City in 1980. “I don’t have any perspective on a life without people freaking out about my parents, so I don’t know what it would be like for that not to happen,” he said. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

Richardson lags, but has key support

first_imgSandwiched between portraits of Ronald Reagan and The Eagles on one of Hollywood’s most fabled walls, a photo of presidential hopeful Bill Richardson is strategically placed for all to see. “He needs all the karma we can give him,” says Lucy Casado, the owner of Lucy’s El Adobe Caf across from Paramount Studios, where the photo of the New Mexico governor joins many of the entertainment industry’s greats, as well as her political favorites dating back to Bobby Kennedy. “It’s time,” she says, “America had a Latino president.” But Richardson, the son of an American father and a Mexican mother, may be proof that it may be the era of the Latino everywhere today – except in national politics. Richardson is among the second tier of Democratic hopefuls, lagging behind Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama in the polls, in momentum and, most importantly, in fundraising. He reported last week that he’d raised $6.3 million, compared with the $50 million raised by Clinton and Obama together. So Richardson is heading to Hollywood. Here Casado and Lew Werner, businessman and Democratic activist, will be hosting an April 23 fundraiser at her restaurant, which may be one of the few hotbeds of Richardson presidential optimism in Southern California. “Bill Richardson,” insists Casado, who is known in California Democratic Party circles as Attorney General Jerry Brown’s adopted mother, “is going to surprise everyone and make history.” He will have to. Back of the pack With all the moved-up primaries that have made Feb. 5 effectively a national primary, money and fundraising have become all the more important – making things even more difficult for back-of-the-pack candidates like Richardson. But why is it that Richardson – a former Clinton administration Cabinet member, United Nations ambassador and congressman – has failed to generate much excitement, especially among the growing Latino constituencies energized by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s historic election in 2005? “For starters, he’s not a rock star,” says Jaime Regalado, executive director of the Pat Brown Institute at Cal State Los Angeles. “He comes from a little-known state, and it’s been the rock stars \ who have been getting all the endorsements, all the headlines and, most importantly, most of the money. “He’s also not well-known even among the nation’s Latinos. Some who recognize the name don’t know if he’s Latino or not. Some don’t think he is. Some are simply confused about it.” Plus, Regalado and other political observers agree, Richardson has to tread carefully with the Latino issue in a political landscape in which immigration has become a polarizing issue. Richardson, currently in North Korea on a fact-finding mission designed to bolster his campaign, understands. “I won’t be running as a Hispanic candidate,” he said in an interview in Los Angeles leading up to his entry into the presidential race. Running as a American “I am running as an American – proud to be Hispanic, proud of my heritage. Ours is a growing, dynamic community in America. But I won’t just be focusing on Hispanic issues or trying to get the Hispanic vote.” It has been an awkward tightrope act. On one side, for political reasons, the Latino aspect is something that Pasadena-born Richardson is consciously downplaying, just as Villaraigosa did in his 2005 mayoral campaign. On the other hand, it has been largely Latinos who have kept the Richardson campaign viable and made him look competitive through the early fundraising frenzy. If he were to be nominated, he would become the first Latino to win a major presidential bid, just as Obama would be the first African American and Clinton the first woman. The April 23 event will be the second fundraiser Casado has hosted for Richardson, who spent much of his childhood in Mexico City. In February, former Clinton-official-turned-lobbyist Mickey Ibarra threw a “Latino Leader” fundraising breakfast for Richardson in Washington, D.C. In Atlanta, a former Latino state senator hosted a fundraiser for him. Ed Romero, a former ambassador to Spain, organized an event that raised $2 million, while Dallas Latino leaders gathered up $50,000 more in that city. But it’s been in Los Angeles that Latino leaders – Villaraigosa and State Assembly Speaker Fabian Nu ez among them – have kept their distance while being noticeably more receptive to the overtures of Clinton and Obama. Avoiding question Villaraigosa so far has sidestepped the question of a presidential endorsement. “We’re very fortunate in this country to have such a deep and talented field for the Democratic nomination for president,” he told reporters last month. “Everything has its time and its place.” Political consultant Bill Orozco believes the Villaraigosa-Richardson connection may be among the more interesting to watch over the coming months. “Richardson sent a handful of staffers from the New Mexico Democratic Party to help Antonio in the 2005 campaign,” says Orozco. “But now both men have chips on the table as to who will remain the rising Hispanic star of the Democratic Party.” Regalado even wonders if Richardson isn’t positioning himself for the vice presidential spot on the Democratic ticket. “He’d be a great No. 2 person,” Regalado said. “Don’t bet the farm against it based on what they’ll say – that’s not what he’s shooting for or would even consider. “He would be a tremendously strong \ for whoever tops the ticket, especially with that natural constituency behind him.” Growing numbers The Latinos – their growing numbers make them potential swing votes in Texas, Illinois and Michigan, states with high numbers of Electoral College votes, as well as in Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico. Latinos in Florida are primarily Cuban Americans who are conservative and usually vote Republican. In California, which has 55 Electoral College votes, about one in every three residents is Latino – a total of 14 million people, according to the Public Policy Institute. And that number is expected to increase. Experts also estimate that 14 percent of the state’s 16 million registered voters – or about 2.2 million people – are Latino, with nearly 60 percent of them registered as Democrats. In California, the increasing Latino political presence only reinforces the state’s decidedly Democratic voting history in recent national elections. Meanwhile, Casado has been busy trying to staple together the network of old and present Jerry Brown supporters – the musicians and entertainment people who are regulars at her restaurant and whom she often tapped to raise tens of thousands of dollars for Brown’s gubernatorial and presidential campaigns of the past, as well as for his political re-emergence in recent years. “I just got Lyle Lovett on board,” she said after meeting with the singer last week. “He likes Richardson. He didn’t know he was Latino. “He said the same thing I said: `It’s time we elected a Latino president.”‘ tony.castro@dailynews.com (818) 713-3761160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

CREDITORS MEETING CALLED FOR BALLYBOFEY COMPANY

first_imgANOTHER sign of the times – a well-known Co Donegal company which provided protective clothing for thousands of workers during the boom has gone bust.A creditor’s meeting has been called for Safeguard Protective Clothing Manufacturers in Ballybofey.The company was established in March 1999 and have a UK office in Manchester, England. It’s local base was at the Northern Point business centre. A creditor’s meeting will take place at the An Grianan Hotel in Burt on Tuesday week, January 17th, at 9.15am.Safeguard was at the forefront of the latest developments within the workwear clothing industry, in particular high visibility and flame retardant workwear as well as GORE-TEX Rainwear.The company had developed state of the art fabric and material technologies and innovative product designs to create a reputation as a leading innovator within the workwear market.© 2011 donegaldaily.com, all Rights Reserved The copying, republication or redistribution of donegaldaily.com Content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited by law. Follow us on www.twitter.com/donegaldailyFollow us on www.facebook.com/donegaldailySell anything on www.donegaldailyclassifieds.com CREDITORS MEETING CALLED FOR BALLYBOFEY COMPANY was last modified: January 6th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:ballybofey newssafeguardworkwear companylast_img read more

Casualty breakdown

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Percent of the dead who were in the Army: 68. Percent in the Air Force: 1. Percent in the National Guard or Reserves: 25. Percent who died in three Iraqi provinces with mostly Sunni Muslims, the branch of Islam to which Saddam Hussein belongs: 53. Percent who died outside military action: 23. Percent who died in accidents on land: 12. Number who died of illness: 9. Number of friendly fire deaths confirmed by the Department of Defense: 4. Number killed in rifle and grenade attack by fellow soldier at Camp Pennsylvania in Kuwait: 2. Number of commanders killed in so-called fragging attack – by a soldier on a superior – at a camp outside Baghdad: 2. Percent who were officers: 10. Number older than 45 years: 30. Number who were age 18: 20. Number of women: 44. Percent of the dead who were women: 2. Percent who were Hispanic: 11. Percent who belonged to a minority group: 25. Number from California, the most of any state: 215. Number from Alaska, least of any state: 4. Number from Texas: 174. Number from New York state: 92. Number from Puerto Rico: 16. Percent from the South: 38. Percent from the Northeast: 16. Number of foreign citizens: 76. Number from Mexico, the country with the most foreign citizens: 27. Number identified by the Defense Department who were awarded posthumous citizenship: 24. Number who died after five years or more in military service: 568. Number who died within first three months of their tour of duty: 925. Percent of total dead who were married: 40. Percent with children: 30. NOTE ON NUMBERS: The numbers are based on counts by the Department of Defense and The Associated Press. Most items are based on 1,985 deaths tallied by the DOD as of Oct. 25. The AP’s count, which includes deaths reported by news staffers in Iraq, has been consistently somewhat ahead of the DOD’s. The percentages for minorities were last updated Oct. 15, and the number of foreign citizens was updated Sept. 3. The numbers for marital and parental status, as well as when killed during tour of duty and military service, include 245 deaths in Afghan operations that cannot be separated out.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Who are the dead of Operation Iraqi Freedom? How did they die? Like the rest of America, they are a diverse group. A numerical portrait of U.S. military members who have died so far in the war in Iraq: Number who died since major combat ended April 30, 2003: 1,846. Percent who died since major combat ended: 93. Number lost in November 2004, the month with the most deaths: 137. last_img read more

Northern California woman who slipped, died at Lake Tahoe’s Eagle Falls ID’d

first_imgEMERALD BAY — A woman who died at Eagle Falls was identified as 35-year-old Dina Stephanie Espinosa from the Bay Area, according to authorities.Espinosa was sitting in a pool of water near the waterfall Friday when she slipped while reaching for a branch, and was swept away in fast-moving waters, according to a statement from the El Dorado County Sheriff.A search and rescue team and dive team recovered Espinosa’s body, who was found deceased, according to the sheriff’s department.A GoFundMe …last_img

Dinolava Theory Back in Eruption

first_imgMeteor impact or volcanic eruption?  Science Now reports that the volcano theory of dinosaur extinction has rejuvenated, challenging the long popularity of the Chicxulub impact hypothesis.    Notwithstanding all the dramatic animations on science documentaries of a cataclysmic meteor wiping out the dinosaurs, the article by Carolyn Gramling states that “Scientists have long wrangled over the cause of the extinctions….”  A new French study of magnetic alignments of lavas in the Deccan Traps of India, some of the biggest lava fields in the world, suggests that the cataclysmic eruptions occurred over a much shorter time period than previously believed – 30,000 years instead of millions – short enough, they claim, to affect worldwide climate.  Some of the older eruptions may have happened even more rapidly because there is no evidence of weathering between successive layers.    A Dutch proponent of the impact scenario is not convinced, however.  He said we don’t know enough about behavior and variability of the Earth’s magnetic field to make strong arguments based on magnetic alignments in rocks.  Gramling says, “He also questions whether any known geophysical mechanism could have spewed out so much lava in such a short time.”Readers, take note: the Science Channel and all the documentaries present their scenarios as fact, and try to make them seem so certain that all scientists agree.  The dating of events, especially, is rarely if ever questioned.  Here, one side is claiming that the old dates of the Deccan Traps are wrong; the other side is questioning whether we can tell anything from magnetic alignments (even though they are commonly used to convince the viewing public of the precision of dating methods).  Since, in the above article, neither theory overlaps the other (see 10/01/2003 entry), each must independently make its case.  Do you begin to get the idea that neither side knows what on earth they are talking about?  Good.  Your eyes are open.    We need to realize how little we can know about prehistory by empirical methods (cf. 11/05/2003)  We need to acknowledge to what extent the data are subject to being molded to human interpretations and presuppositions.  Data exist in the present, not the past (visualize this).  Scientists build models to incorporate the present observations, but short of a time machine or eyewitnesses (02/17/2003 commentary), the past is forever out of reach, and getting more so all the time.  This is not to overlook that some models are more plausible than others (cf. 04/22/2004).  But while seemingly plausible now, today’s leading model can be (and often is) overturned with the next finding.  The Chicxulub story attained such a consensus in recent years as to be nearly enshrined as The Official Story of the Death of the Dinosaurs, but now look; it’s got major problems (04/10/2003, 09/25/2003, 11/25/2003).  Reporters, TV producers and writers of children’s books have not, for the most part, caught up with this development (see 05/13/2004 example), but it is another case of a popular model becoming a has-been.  Such turnarounds litter the history of science.  Writing with an air of certainty about prehistory, therefore, mars otherwise good books like The Privileged Planet (e.g., pp. 22ff) that speak of events in the unobservable past, including magnetic field signatures, as if recorded on steadily-moving tape to be just read off by the unbiased eyes of scientists.  The Dutch critic here reminds us that we know too little about planetary magnetic fields to speak so confidently.  That goes for other dating methods as well.  Discerning minds do well not to attribute infallibility to mortals.As we have pointed out before (10/06/2004 commentary), it is much safer to play conservative and not extrapolate observed measurements recklessly into the past.  It is easier to set upper limits on time than lower limits.  For example, estimating the lifetime of a comet into the past by a few more orbits than have been observed is reasonable, but claiming it came into existence a million years ago extends the observations far beyond human experience.  The former stretches observed behavior a little way back; the latter extrapolates a few data points into unknown territory by many orders of magnitude.  Who knows what perturbations might have changed the orbit before we observed it?  It’s more justifiable to project how long the comet might last given its present rate of mass loss (an upper limit), than to claim it has had to exist for at least umpty million years (a lower limit).  In the current case, the lack of weathering between layers would seem to place an upper limit to the amount of time that must have transpired during the sequence of eruptions.  An upper limit is, of course, a limit; the actual age could have been much lower.  For more examples, see 05/01/2004 story about tufa formations, and the 05/10/2004 article about caves.The admission about whether any known geophysical mechanism could have spewed out so much lava in such a short time is revealing.  Whatever happened to uniformitarianism?  (Notice: it’s gone; catastrophism rules—see 11/04/2003 and 05/22/2003.)  But don’t let these guys puzzle about that problem only here at home.  Have them tell us why big eruptions should be happening right now on Io (05/04/2004), Triton (06/05/2003), Titan (06/09/2005) and Enceladus (07/29/2005) after billions of years, each of them smaller than the Earth (and therefore possessing less gravitational heat), or why comets should still be erupting after so many trips around the sun (03/27/2003).  It’s not that the moyboys* can’t concoct a good story, but to do so, they must keep inserting ad hoc assumptions to keep processes going that would otherwise fizzle out in far less time.  In today’s case, we see two sides (both naturalistic and evolutionary) undermining the credibility of each other’s tale.  The proper lesson is that neither idea can be trusted, and neither side knows what happened, because they weren’t there.*A new word meaning scientists and reporters who toss around the terms millions of years, billions of years with reckless abandon.    The upshot is that, despite all the appearance of scientific rigor, the measurements and jargon, neither story explains the extinction of the dinosaurs, or why some organisms carried on through the catastrophe as if nothing happened (11/08/2004).  A corollary is that any sufficiently advanced model resting on uncertain premises is indistinguishable from a novel.  After all, a good novel usually takes place in the real world and deals with observable, tangible things.  Some novels even describe historical personages and places in exquisite detail (cf. the detailed measurements of magnetic field orientations in present-day rocks).  It does not follow that the events described ever happened, or even if they did, that they happened when the believer claims they happened, or in the way they happened, or that nothing else happened that might bear on what happened.  Another corollary is that a newer model is not necessarily better.  A fancier mansion built on the same shifting sand has the same underlying vulnerability (see 05/13/2004).  It is a specious response, therefore, to retort, “Well, then, what is your model?”  Some choose not to build on the sand, but on the rock.(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South Africa lures BPO investors

first_img9 January 2007“The BPO sector is not just the flavour of the month, but one which will help to move South Africa further up the value chain and become a knowledge economy,” Deputy President Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka told industry leaders in London as the country launched a bid to market itself as an international destination for business process outsourcing.A high-powered delegation of BPO industry experts from South Africa, led by Mlambo-Ngcuka, presented industry leaders in London with a business case for outsourcing to South Africa at a special seminar at the SA High Commission in London in December.South Africa’s value propositionTrade and Industry Minister Mandisi Mpahlwa, in his keynote address on “South Africa’s value proposition for business process outsourcing,” said that while it took time for a developing country to develop a track record, South Africa had more than risen to the challenge. This article was first published by Reconnect Africa, an online careers and business magazine for professional Africans around the world.“South Africa has the largest economy in Africa, the most industrial development on the continent and the most educational and training institutions,” he said. “We have had 12 years of sound economic management, and we have a growing economy which has yet to realize its full potential.”With mature and established institutions in the banking, insurance and telecommunications sectors, SA has the business foundation needed for high-value outsourcing opportunities.The country already has a vibrant BPO industry, with around 70 operations and 80 000 people employed in contact centres and back offices in the major centres. Centres of excellenceReconnect Africa speaks to Mfanu Mfayela, CEO of the SA Contact Centre Community, about why SA is becoming a BPO destination of choice.Key factors in SA’s favour are its time zone, which falls comfortably within European time zones, as well as its English-language capacity.“South Africa is not necessarily competing with the cheapest, but it is comparable with many operations in the UK and Europe,” Mpahlwa said. “We can combine superior quality with high cost savings.“We have a set of distinctive assets, a first call resolution higher than other lower cost destinations and a large, well-educated labour pool.“We produce 300 000 school leavers and 100 000 graduates a year from world-class universities and we have a low budget deficit, sound infrastructure and the cheapest electricity prices in the world.”The minister also cited the benefits of South Africa’s highly attractive lifestyle, which has encouraged the immigration of diverse nationalities and communities, offering a range of language capabilities to benefit the BPO sector.Government incentivesPromoting business process outsourcing in South Africa fits squarely with the Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for SA (Asgi-SA), the goverment’s strategy to raise economic growth to 6% and halve poverty and unemployment by 2014.The government, working closely with the industry, recently developed a five-year plan to strengthen the industry by deepening the talent pool and creating financial incentives for investment. Calling the Cape – Not just a holiday destination, Cape Town sets its sights on call centre investment. Read the full story on Reconnect Africa.“Substantial training assistance, a skills development programme and a learnership scheme will be made available to companies that locate their operations in South Africa,” Mpahlwa told the London seminar. “Companies will get cash grants, tax deductions and the acquisition of work-ready talent.”On the cost of telecommunications in SA, the minister said that deregulation and promotion of competition was the way to achieve lower prices, adding that a five-year, R30-billion investment by state company Telkom as well as a BPO dispensation on pricing were in the pipeline.Also addressing the seminar, Deputy President Mlambo-Ngcuka emphasized the government’s programme for “removing entry barriers that we, as government, are responsible for.”Constraints had been identified in the areas of infrastructure, transport logistics and telecommunications, Mlambo-Ngcuka said. “We are addressing the costs and ensuring that in three to five years, South Africa will not be the same place as today for these services.”The Deputy President pointed out that while South Africa has a population of 45 million, as a key member of the Southern African Development Community it offers access to a market of 200 million people.“BPO is not just the flavour of the month,” she said, “but a sector which will help South Africa to move further up the value chain and become a knowledge economy.”IBM, Shell case studiesThe seminar also heard case studies on offshoring in South Africa from representatives of IBM and Shell.Shell’s case study highlighted the quality of service provided by its operations in South Africa.“It’s not about cost reduction but about finding good value – although there are also cost benefits,” said Julian Davis, Shell’s programme director for global customer services.Mteto Nyati, director of global technology services for IBM in South Africa, told the seminar that South Africa was “at the centre of IBM’s new strategy,” which involves creating global shared services and centres of excellence in seven strategic locations around the world.The company is moving many of the high-value services it provides to its clients – including household names such as Boots and ABN Amro – to South Africa, where it currently employs over 1 500 staff“South Africa is not a normal call centre location but a highly technical environment where highly skilled people are managing complex IT issues,” Nyati said.This article was first published by Reconnect Africa, an online careers and business magazine for professional Africans around the world.last_img read more

Pondering an Attic Conversion

first_imgCreating a Conditioned AtticFans in the AtticVented or Unvented Attic?Spray Foam InsulationGreen Basics: Cooling OptionsFans and Natural CoolingDesigning a Good Ventilation System The attic is just another roomOnce the roof deck is insulated, the attic becomes a conditioned space just like any other room in the house, GBA senior editor Martin Holladay says. “If you install closed-cell spray foam on the underside of your roof deck, creating an unvented attic, there is no reason to believe that your attic will be warmer than a vented attic,” Holladay writes. “If anything, it will probably be cooler. “Your attic will be within 5 or 10 degrees of your living room temperature. If your living room is hot, your attic will be, too. If your living room is cool, your attic will be, too.”The closed-cell foam, Holladay adds, should have only a marginal effect on how long the new roof shingles will last. Although the insulation will make the roof shingles “somewhat hotter” than they would be over an unconditioned attic, insulation is only one of a number of factors affecting shingle temperature.“The most important factor affecting shingle temperature is shingle color,” Holladay says. “If you want cooler shingles, out of the belief that cooler shingles last longer — and they probably do — then install white shingles, not dark shingles.” Insulation plan has some disadvantagesSpraying 5 inches of foam on the bottom of the roof deck has at least a couple of problems, says Dana Dorsett.Because closed-cell foam is vapor-impermeable, it would trap moisture at the roof deck, Dorsett says, and using foam at that thickness is a lost cause from an insulation point of view because of thermal bridging through the rafters.“What’s more,” Dorsett says, “the blowing agents of most 2-lb. foam have a huge life cycle global warming hit, making anything beyond the first inch or two net negative for the climate.”Instead, Dorsett recommends spraying 1 inch to 2 inches of foam against the roof deck and finishing with damp-spray cellulose or high-density fiberglass, a strategy that’s “the best of both worlds.” In support of his suggestion, Dorsett refers Graff to a Building Science Corporation report on the subject.“All insulation systems are compromises,” Holladay says. Installing a continuous layer of rigid foam insulation over the roof sheathing or under the rafters would control thermal bridging, he advises.“Unlike Dana Dorsett,” Holladay adds, “I don’t think that installing 5 or 6 inches of closed-cell spray foam on the underside of your roof sheathing will cause any moisture problems. It’s true that the roof sheathing won’t dry to interior to any degree — but as long as the roof sheathing is dry on the day that it is insulated, the system should perform as designed.” RELATED ARTICLES center_img Incorporating whole-house ventilationGraff currently places a fan in an attic window for nighttime cooling. With downstairs windows opened, and the fan in the attic window running, warm air is pushed out of the house and cool outdoor air is drawn in to replace it. This is an effective, low-cost way of cooling down a house without the use of air conditioning.With an insulated roof deck, Graff wonders, what happens to this strategy? “So how does warm air leave the attic?” he asks. “It sounds as if the air in the attic will never get changed, and I will no longer be able to bring in cool air at night.”Holladay noted that nighttime ventilation cooling — using either a conventional whole-house fan or the NightBreeze system — is a good way to cool a house in any climate that has cool tempertures at night. Graff responded that the NightBreeze system seems like something that would be added to a central air-conditioning system, not a stand-alone solution.“When you convert a vented unconditioned attic into an unvented conditioned attic, you are incorporating the attic into your conditioned space,” Holladay replies. “It’s just like another room in your house. It shouldn’t be significantly warmer or colder than any other room. It’s just like a second-floor bedroom or a third-floor bedroom. But If you want nighttime ventilation cooling using a whole-house fan (usually installed in the ceiling of the upstairs hallway), it’s much easier to do with a vented, unconditioned attic.”But, James Morgan writes, there’s no reason Graff wouldn’t be able to continue using an exhaust fan installed in his attic window — if he really needs to. “I see no reason why this arrangement will not continue to work in the new attic regime,” Morgan says. “To get the proper benefits, of course, there has to be an open air path to the attic space where the window is located and all window AC units need to be shut off.“A whole-house fan is simply a bypass arrangement to enable nighttime cooling in homes without such a convenient layout as you currently have. It’s not so much that it won’t work, but that you don’t need it.” Rob Graff is getting a new roof, and with it an opportunity to turn his vented attic into an insulated, conditioned space.But he’s also got some concerns.“They will be spraying 5 inches or so of closed-cell foam directly against the decking,” he writes in a Q&A post at GreenBuildingAdvisor. “This will fully seal my attic. My question is, how does this work if you do not have air conditioning in the house, other than window units in the bedrooms and one in the living room?”Graff’s two-story house includes a partially finished attic, and he’s not sure how that can be vented once the roof deck is insulated.“My concern is that, because heat rises, the attic will gather heat. How do I get that heat out of the attic if it has no vents? Also, how would I integrate a whole-house fan into this design?”Graff’s questions are the topic for this Q&A Spotlight. Our expert’s opinionPeter Yost, GBA’s technical director, adds these thoughts:First, it is always helpful to know the climate that any assembly is facing, whether there is any HVAC equipment in the attic, and what the roof cladding is. I am going to assume that this is a cold climate, there is no HVAC equipment in the attic, and the roofing consists of 3-tab asphalt shingles.Given these assumptions, here is my hygrothermal assessment (that is, my assessment of the energy and moisture performance of the attic space and roof):1. Net energy efficiency gain by moving the air and thermal barrier to the roof line.In almost all climates and building types, it is a net gain to “cathedralize” the attic, even if this space is not going to be used as fully conditioned space or living space. This is especially true for hot climates, but in many cases holds for cold climates as well, in large part because the roof plane is usually the easiest plane to get these two barriers continuous, and because the increased volume of the overall inside space of the building typically represents a relatively small energy penalty. Particularly in a cold climate, sealing air leaks at the eave is critical to combating ice dams.2. Using the same attic window(s) to ventilate at night.There is no reason that Rob Graff can’t continue to pull air from the living spaces below, up and through the cathedralized attic space. In fact, the significant moderation in temperatures afforded by the roofline air and thermal barriers will reduce the need for night-time cooling.3. Impact on attic solar heat gain of roof cladding type and color.The thermal performance of the roofing (its reflectance — the fraction of solar energy the roof cladding rejects — and its emittance — the fraction of absorbed energy the cladding can re-radiate) is important. But take a look at the numbers below for different roofing materials. White shingles are much better than black, but white metal roofing is far better than white shingles at rejecting the sun’s energy and shedding any that it absorbs. Interestingly, while Galvalume has a really high reflectance, the small portion that it absorbs is not easily re-radiated or emiited, so a white metal roof is far better at keeping an attic cool than a bare metal roof. We don’t know the age or condition of Rob’s roofing, but switching to white shingles is not nearly as effective as switching to white metal, albeit at a much higher initial cost.White 3-tab asphalt shingles (representative numbers from Energy Star): Initial reflectance – 0.66; Initial emissivity – 0.85.Black 3-tab asphalt shingles (representative numbers from Florida Solar Energy Center): Initial reflectance – 0.034; Initial emissivity – 0.90.White metal roofing: Initial reflectance – 0.84; Initial emissivity – 0.91.Galvalume metal roofing (bare metal): Initial reflectance – 0.90; Initial emissivity – 0.06.4. Drying potential of the closed-cell spray-foamed roof assembly.Given that the vapor permeability of both the spray foam and the asphalt roofing shingles is very low (both are Class I or Class II vapor retarders), the new roof assembly has little to no drying potential. While Martin Holladay is correct in saying that if the roof is dry at the time of spray foaming, it can stay dry, that is really dependent on just how much confidence Rob Graff has in the ability of his roof to shed bulk water and not leak. A very simple roof plane with few penetrations and in a sheltered location is one thing, but a complex roof plane with lots of penetrations in an exposed location is a whole other matter. I generally recommend strongly against assemblies without one dedicated direction of drying potential, unless the roof assembly has been designed and constructed (and will be maintained) flawlessly.5. Need for ignition barrier on spray foam.One code inspector may give a homeowner a pass for leaving the spray foam exposed in a non-living space;another may not. But frankly, if the pitch of the roof brings any utility to the newly enclosed attic space, Rob Graff will end up storing stuff or inviting people to this space, and it will need an ignition barrier, easily provided by gypsum board as the attic is finished.last_img read more