Center for Global Business & Technology opens

first_imgCenter for Global Business & Technologyat Champlain College opens its doorsBURLINGTON, Vt.-Champlain College opened a $10 million academic facilityon August 30. The Center for Global Business & Technology will enhance theCollege’s ability to put students to work on real business challenges forVermont companies and non-profits, which will fuel Vermont’s businesscommunity. Students will interact with these clients and Champlain facultymembers in new high-tech classrooms and multimedia suites, a marketresearch and strategy room, focus group room, international businessresource center and conference rooms.”This building speaks to Champlain’s philosophy of action-basededucation,” said President Roger H. Perry. “The Center includes as muchintegration with the business community as we could build into it. It’s afacility that benefits students as well as Vermont’s public and privatesectors.”In the new center, student teams will earn hands-on experience as theycomplete business and technology projects for clients. Organizations thatwish to connect with these resources are invited to visitwww.champlain.edu/corporate(link is external) for contact information.In the market research and strategy room-a nerve center ofentrepreneurial activity-students from interrelated majors will cometogether in teams to recommend new strategies for businesses, includinghow to use technology for competitive advantage. In addition, theinternational business resource center on the top floor provides the bestinternational trade information the state has to offer.Approximately $1.5 million of the new facility was an investment inindustry-driven technology that you would more likely see in a corporateheadquarters than a classroom. In the new Mac G5 computer classrooms onthe ground floor, clusters of five student workstations are networked totheir own wall-mounted, 40-inch flatscreen monitor so each team candisplay their work on the wall for feedback. Additional multimedia suitesand “supersuites” across the hall put top-of-the-line visual and audioequipment at the fingertips of Champlain students.Classrooms were designed so teams of students can easily break off andwork on projects together while they employ computers and “electronicwhiteboards” to save their work. Video conferencing and speaker phones areavailable to meet with distant experts, clients or overseas students, andwireless laptops can be used in every nook and cranny of the building.last_img read more

BED to Seek Rate Increase

first_imgBED to Seek Rate IncreaseBurlington Electric Department announced October 23, 2008, that it will seek a rate increase of up to 5.9 percent from the Public Service Board, pending the approval of the City Council. The increase would become effective Jan. 1, 2009. The exact amount of the increase will be determined as BED endeavors to arrange the optimal debt strategy for 2009 and beyond. The need for the increase is driven by increased power, transmission and operating costs, along with declining sales of electricity that are a result of BED’s successful energy efficiency programs.BED has advanced its ongoing major capital projects, the McNeil air quality improvements and the East Avenue reliability upgrade, through favorable short-term borrowing arranged through the City. This allows BED to reap the benefits of these projects in lowered operating costs as it moves into 2009 without fully absorbing the cost of the debt these projects will require.”That’s the bright side,” said general manager Barbara Grimes. “More problematic is that these projects will still need long-term financing in a bond market that is very uncertain, given the current financial turmoil. Though thankfully we have voter support to obtain bond funding, and we prefer long-term to short-term debt, the bond market is currently expensive. It is difficult to say today when the time will be right. But by implementing these cost-effective projects now, we can count on reaping their benefits to lower the amount needed when we do go for long-term financing.”BED is sensitive to the difficult economic times Burlington’s residents and businesses are experiencing. “While we’re reluctant to put off what we know will be needed and defer debt until tomorrow, we think it is best in the current economic situation to ask for as small a revenue increase as possible,” said Grimes.BED will continue to offer aggressive energy efficiency programs to all its customers. “We’ve known through our planning that these programs will reduce revenue and impact rates in the short term, but participating in these offerings is the best way for our customers to lower their own bills and offset the increased cost. The payoff will come in the long term, when BED can avoid buying new supply sources.”All BED customers are encouraged to explore what’s available for reducing their energy bills by visiting BED’s web site, www.burlingtonelectric.com(link is external), or by calling 658-0300.#30last_img read more

Customers asked to call CVPS if power still out

first_imgOver 500 workers continued to work to restore power to the last 300 CVPS customers in Windham County Thursday morning.”We made good progress Wednesday, and with the light so visible at the end of the tunnel, we’re giving it all we’ve got yet again today,” said spokeswoman Christine Rivers. “Each repair is still coming slow, as crews continue to spend hours to restore power one or two customers at a time, but we expect every customer outage we are aware of to be restored by late tonight. Thus we encourage customers still without power to call 1-800-451-2877.”At daybreak Thursday, more than 75 contract lines crews were working with 40 CVPS line crews, 50 tree crews and hundreds of support staff to wrap up the $3 million restoration effort that began Friday.”This has been a long but amazing restoration effort. The ice and tree damage we’ve seen in Windsor and especially Windham County rivals anything we’ve seen in our service territory. And we could not have done this without the invaluable coordination and support of dozens of utilities and local businesses, and federal, state and local officials,” said CVPS President Bob Young. “We sincerely appreciate the outpouring of support we’ve seen from the customers, communities and businesses we serve. I cannot put into words how much we appreciate everyone’s efforts, patience and selflessness to restore normalcy to our customers. I also want to thank our employees, who have devoted themselves to customers while putting their own lives on hold.”CVPS estimates that it has resolved more than 1,200 separate problems on its system this week, in some cases rebuilding sections that were destroyed within Orange, Windsor and Windham counties. Over 80 poles were broken – more than 50 of those in Windham County alone, and thousands of trees brought down hundreds of lines.PLEASE CALLCVPS asked customers who are still without power as of 8 a.m. today to contact the company at 1-800-451-2877. Due to the extent of the damage in some areas that are affecting only single and small groups of customers, some without power may not be listed in the outage management system. As restoration efforts draw toward an end, the company wants to assure that no one is left without power.If customers see that others in their neighborhood have power, but they do not, CVPS asks that those customers switch their breakers off and on to assure the problem is not localized inside their home.The company also reminded customers that while service lines or overhead wires that run from a pole to a house or business are the utility’s responsibility, the service cable that runs along the side of the house is the customer’s responsibility.If those service cables are damaged, customers should contact an electrician. The service bracket that attaches the service line to the house is generally maintained by CVPS. However, the weather head, attached to the service cable, which prevents water damage to the wiring, is maintained by the customer’s electrician.last_img read more

FairPoint Communications launches wholesale E-Line services for Vermont, NH, Maine

first_imgConsolidated Communications,FairPoint Communications has announced its release of Carrier Ethernet products specifically designed for the wholesale market.FairPoint’s E-Line service is now available to its wholesale customers who are authorized to provide services in Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont. FairPoint has made its new E-Line services of Ethernet Private Line (EPL) and Ethernet Virtual Private Line (EVPL) possible by significantly investing in its communications infrastructure and technology to bring these and other broadband services to northern New England. FairPoint’s new fiber-based, high-capacity network ‘ called VantagePoint(SM) ‘ offers its wholesale customers a better, faster way to connect to their customers.”Offered on our state-of-the-art VantagePoint(SM) network, FairPoint’s Carrier Ethernet services bring unparalleled reliability and service,” said Michelle Hymson, assistant vice president of wholesale services. “Coupled with service availability in hundreds of its central offices, FairPoint’s reach far surpasses other wholesale providers in northern New England.”FairPoint encourages its wholesale customers to contact their account team to review E-Line services and its other high-bandwidth solutions or visit www.FairPoint.com/wholesale(link is external) for more information.About FairPoint CommunicationsFairPoint Communications, Inc., (NASDAQCM: FRP) (www.FairPoint.com(link is external)) is a leading communications provider of high-speed Internet access, local and long-distance phone, television and other broadband services to customers in communities across 18 states. Through its fast, reliable network, FairPoint delivers data and voice networking communications solutions to residential, business and wholesale customers. VantagePoint(SM), FairPoint’s resilient IP-based network in northern New England, provides business customers a fast, flexible, affordable Ethernet connection. The VantagePoint(SM) network supports applications like video conferencing and e-learning. Additional information about FairPoint products and services is available at www.FairPoint.com(link is external). You can also connect with FairPoint on Twitter (www.twitter.com/myfairpoint(link is external)) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/myfairpoint(link is external)).SOURCE FairPoint Communications, Inc. CHARLOTTE, N.C., Oct. 3, 2011 /PRNewswire/ —last_img read more

Governor Shumlin taps Beth Robinson to serve on the Vermont Supreme Court

first_imgGovernor Peter Shumlin today announced the appointment of Beth Robinson to serve on the Vermont Supreme Court. An attorney with nearly two decades of experience practicing law in Vermont, Robinson is also a  widely respected civil rights advocate whose work to secure marriage equality rights in Vermont earned wide national recognition. Robinson will replace Justice Denise Johnson, who is retiring.   Robinson practiced law for 18 years at Langrock Sperry & Wool in Middlebury and Burlington, with a civil practice that included workers’ compensation, family law, employment law, negligence and injury cases. She served as co-counsel in the case of Baker versus Vermont, the landmark case that led to Vermont’s passage of a first-in-the-nation civil union law, and led the successful quest for full marriage equality for same-sex couples in Vermont.  ‘I am proud to appoint Beth Robinson to the Supreme Court,’ the governor said. ‘Beth’s strong legal background, experience with crafting legislation at the State House and commitment to the equal rights of all Vermonters will make her an exceptional justice on the Vermont Supreme Court. While I am thrilled to see Beth go to the Court and believe her to be the best qualified of an extraordinary pool of candidates, I am also sad to lose Beth as my legal counsel. In addition to depending on Beth’s sound legal advice, it is a pleasure to work with her every day.” Robinson added, ‘I’m humbled by the confidence that Governor Shumlin has placed in me, and deeply grateful both for the opportunity I’ve had to serve his administration these past 10 months, and for the chance to serve Vermont’s judiciary in the years to come.’  Robinson graduated from Dartmouth College in 1986 and the University of Chicago Law School in 1989.    According to the Vermont Superme Court Web site, Denise R. Johnson was born in Wyandotte, Michigan. She graduated from Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (A.B., 1969); the University of Connecticut School of Law (J.D., 1974); and the University of Virginia School of Law (LLM, 1995). She taught at the Vermont Law School, 1978-79; served as an Assistant Attorney General, Chief, Public Protection Division, 1980-88; served as chair, Vermont Human Rights Commission, 1988-1990. Appointed Associate Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court, December 3, 1990, by Governor Kunin.Governor’s office. 10.18.2011last_img read more