Center for Global Business & Technology opens

first_imgCenter for Global Business & Technologyat Champlain College opens its doorsBURLINGTON, Vt.-Champlain College opened a $10 million academic facilityon August 30. The Center for Global Business & Technology will enhance theCollege’s ability to put students to work on real business challenges forVermont companies and non-profits, which will fuel Vermont’s businesscommunity. Students will interact with these clients and Champlain facultymembers in new high-tech classrooms and multimedia suites, a marketresearch and strategy room, focus group room, international businessresource center and conference rooms.”This building speaks to Champlain’s philosophy of action-basededucation,” said President Roger H. Perry. “The Center includes as muchintegration with the business community as we could build into it. It’s afacility that benefits students as well as Vermont’s public and privatesectors.”In the new center, student teams will earn hands-on experience as theycomplete business and technology projects for clients. Organizations thatwish to connect with these resources are invited to visitwww.champlain.edu/corporate(link is external) for contact information.In the market research and strategy room-a nerve center ofentrepreneurial activity-students from interrelated majors will cometogether in teams to recommend new strategies for businesses, includinghow to use technology for competitive advantage. In addition, theinternational business resource center on the top floor provides the bestinternational trade information the state has to offer.Approximately $1.5 million of the new facility was an investment inindustry-driven technology that you would more likely see in a corporateheadquarters than a classroom. In the new Mac G5 computer classrooms onthe ground floor, clusters of five student workstations are networked totheir own wall-mounted, 40-inch flatscreen monitor so each team candisplay their work on the wall for feedback. Additional multimedia suitesand “supersuites” across the hall put top-of-the-line visual and audioequipment at the fingertips of Champlain students.Classrooms were designed so teams of students can easily break off andwork on projects together while they employ computers and “electronicwhiteboards” to save their work. Video conferencing and speaker phones areavailable to meet with distant experts, clients or overseas students, andwireless laptops can be used in every nook and cranny of the building.last_img read more

Coronavirus epidemic ‘far from over’ in Asia – WHO official

first_imgThe WHO does not expect any country to be safe, as the coronavirus will eventually get everywhere, said WHO technical adviser Matthew Griffith.”Whereas countries and areas in this region have shown how to flatten the curve, outbreaks continue to pop up in new places and importation remains a concern,” Griffith said at the briefing, citing cases in Singapore and South Korea from people who travelled abroad.The focus of the epidemic is now on Europe, but that will likely shift to other regions, Griffith said. “Let me be clear. The epidemic is far from over in Asia and the Pacific. This is going to be a long-term battle and we cannot let down our guard,” Kasai told a virtual media briefing.”We need every country to keep preparing for large-scale community transmission.”Countries with limited resources are a priority, such as Pacific Island nations, he said, as they have to ship samples to other countries for diagnoses, and transportation restrictions are making that more difficult.Kasai warned that for countries that are seeing a tapering off of cases, they should not let down their guard, or the virus may come surging back. The coronavirus epidemic is “far from over” in the Asia-Pacific region, and current measures to curb the spread of the virus are buying time for countries to prepare for large-scale community transmissions, a WHO official said on Tuesday.Even with all the measures, the risk of transmission in the region will not go away as long as the pandemic continues, said Takeshi Kasai, Regional Director for the Western Pacific at the World Health Organization (WHO).The new coronavirus first surfaced in central China in late 2019. Infections have now exceeded 770,000 cases worldwide, with the United States, Italy and Spain overtaking mainland China in confirmed cases.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Fortum solution recycles 80 of Liion battery material

first_imgA new solution from Fortum, a Finnish clean-energy company, increases the amount of material in Li-ion batteries that can be recycled to more than 80%, according to the company. The current EU-mandated recycling rate is only 50% of the total weight of the battery.First the company makes the used batteries safe for mechanical treatment, directing plastics, aluminium and copper  to their own recycling processes. Then it uses an industrial-scale, low-CO2 hydrometallurgical process to recover cobalt, manganese and nickel from the battery.The chemical and mineral components of a battery form a ‘black mass’ that typically consists of a mixture of lithium, manganese, cobalt and nickel in different ratios. Of these, nickel and cobalt are the most valuable and most difficult to recover.Fortum uses a recovery process that involves a chemical precipitation methodology that allows these minerals to be recovered and delivered to battery manufacturers for reuse in the production of new batteries. The technology was developed by Crisolteq, which has a hydrometallurgical recycling facility in Harjavalta, Finland, where the black mass can be treated on an industrial scale.“There are very few working, economically viable technologies for recycling the majority of materials in lithium-ion batteries,” said Kalle Saarimaa, Vice President, Fortum Recycling and Waste. “We saw a challenge that was not yet solved and developed a scalable recycling solution for all industries using batteries.” Source: Fortum via Green Car Congress Source: Electric Vehicles Magazinelast_img read more