Kearns makes one change for Sligo clash

first_imgThe match day panel is as follows:1.          Evan Comerford – Kilsheelan-Kilcash  2.          Kevin Fahey – Clonmel Commercials  3.          Alan Campbell – Moyle Rovers  4.          Ciarán Mc Donald – Aherlow  5.          Jimmy Feehan  – Killenaule  6.          Robbie Kiely – Carbery Rangers  7.          Shane Leahy – Arravale Rovers  8.          Alan Moloney – Rockwell Rovers  9.          Martin Dunne – Moyle Rovers  10.        Josh Keane – Golden-Kilfeacle   11.        Peter Acheson (Capt.) – Moyle Rovers  12.        Jason Lonergan – Clonmel Commercials  13.        Conor Sweeney – Ballyporeen  14.        Michael Quinlivan – Clonmel Commercials  15.        Philip Austin – Borrisokane Kevin Fahey moves to corner-back with Shane Leahy named at right half-back.A victory over the Yeats County will guarantee that Tipp won’t be relegated.Promotion is still a possibility for the Premier County too however for that to transpire results will have to go their way on the final day of the regular season.   Subs:  16.        Ciarán Kendrick – Moyle Rovers  17.        Billy Hewitt – Ardfinnan  18.        George Hannigan – Shannon Rovers  19.        Liam Casey – Cahir  20.        Donagh Leahy – Arravale Rovers  21.        Brian Fox – Éire Óg Annacarty                                        22.        Donal Lynch – Clonmel Commercials  23.        John O’Callaghan – Ballyporeen  24.        Mark Hanley – Aherlow  25.        Kevin O’Halloran – Portroe  26.        Stephen Quirke – Moyle RoversTipp FM’s live coverage of the match gets underway at 1.50pm and will be brought to you in association with Tipperary Renault.ie.last_img read more

Woods pulls out of Bay Hill because of back pain

first_imgTiger Woods hits from the rough off the seventh fairway during the final round of the Cadillac Championship golf tournament Sunday, March 9, 2014, in Doral, Fla. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Tiger Woods withdrew from the Arnold Palmer Invitational on Tuesday because of persistent pain in his back, creating even more uncertainty for golf’s No. 1 player with the Masters only three weeks away.And that’s if Woods can even play in the Masters.“I personally called Arnold today to tell him that, sadly, I won’t be able to play in his tournament this year,” Woods said on his website.“I would like to express my regrets to the Orlando fans, the volunteers, the tournament staff and the sponsors for having to miss the event. Unfortunately, my back spasms and the pain haven’t subsided.”Woods had to withdraw after 13 holes of the final round at the Honda Classic three weeks ago because of what he called back spasms and pain in his lower back. He tried to defend his title the following week at Doral, only for his back to flare up again in the final round. He closed with a 78, the highest Sunday score of his PGA Tour career and the first final round without a birdie.After a week of rest and treatment, he didn’t feel fit to play Bay Hill, where he is an eight-time winner, including the past two years.“I am certainly sorry that Tiger is not able to play,” Palmer said. “Quite obviously, we will miss having him here this week. He called me to tell me that his back was still giving him a lot of trouble and he didn’t feel he should play. I told him I understood and wished him well.”This is only the second time that Woods has not played Bay Hill. He also missed in 2010 when he sat out more than four months during the scandal in his personal life.The Masters, which is April 10-13, is the only major Woods has never missed.“It’s too early to know about the Masters, and I will continue to be evaluable and work closely with my doctors,” Woods said. “I feel badly that I won’t be able to play in this great tournament this week.”Woods first showed signs of back pain at Bethpage Black at The Barclays in 2012, which he attributed to a soft bed at his hotel. He felt twinges during the final round of the PGA Championship last year, and when his back bothered him in the final round of The Barclays two weeks later, he said it was unrelated.This has been the longest sustained problem with the lower back. “A bad back is no joke,” Woods said at Doral.Woods is off to the worst start of his 18 years on tour.At Torrey Pines, where his eight victories included a U.S. Open, Woods shot his highest score on American soil with a 79 to miss the 54-hole cut. He tied for 41st in the Dubai Desert Classic a week later for his worst finish in that event.Woods had said he spent his offseason working on his body and didn’t spend enough time on his game, so it was troubling for him to then deal with yet another injury. He shot a 65 in the third round of the Honda Classic before having what he described as back spasms similar to The Barclays last year.At Doral, he was only three shots out of the lead going into the final round and in the penultimate group when he said an awkward stance while playing out of a bunker on the sixth fairway of the Blue Monster caused his back to start hurting again.“That’s what set it off and then it was done after that,” Woods said at Doral. “Just see if I could actually manage … keep the spasms at bay.”Woods had said at the start of the Florida swing that he was taking a look at his schedule leading up to the Masters, though he never made it clear if he intended to add another tournament. Woods rarely gives a “yes” or “no” to questions pertaining to his plans.He has never played the week before any major except for the PGA Championship.In 2010, after revelations of extramarital affairs, Woods had gone 145 days without hitting a meaningful shot when he arrived at Augusta National. He opened with a 68, his lowest first-round score ever at the Masters, and wound up in a tie for fourth.Swing coach Sean Foley said he would not read too much into how Woods can prepare for the Masters if he can play.“I’ve been coaching on tour long enough now to know that Tuesday doesn’t affect Wednesday. There’s no rhyme or reason to performance,” Foley said in a telephone interview. “Tiger is always about the majors, and he’s solely about the majors now. He’s got to do the right thing. He’s just doing the right due diligence about it.”last_img read more

Saint Martin’s University’s 2017 Distinguished Alumni to be Honored at Homecoming

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Saint Martin’s UniversitySix alumni of Saint Martin’s University and High School will be honored with 2017 Distinguished Alumni Awards at the University’s annual Homecoming festivities on Saturday, February 11, on the University campus.Alumni are nominated, then chosen for the honor based on outstanding community service, professional achievement and/or service to Saint Martin’s. The University began formally recognizing its alumni of note in the early 1980s.“They have a lifetime of achievements:  personally, professionally and with Saint Martin’s University, and we are honored to have them as alumni,” says Cecelia Loveless, vice president for institutional advancement.Award recipients for 2017 are Paula Bouwer-Ronshaugen ’86, Bremerton; Peter Fluetsch HS’56, ’58, Olympia; Andy Hwang ’94, Federal Way; Ivan Lui-Kwan ’67, Honolulu, Hawaii; Abbot Neal Roth, O.S.B. ’65, Lacey; and Jim Swenson HS’74, Lacey. Here are some highlights about each of this year’s award recipients:Peter Fluetsch, HS’56,’58Peter Fluetsch is a successful entrepreneur, respected in the community and within his industry. He and his wife Kathy founded Sunset Air, a heating and air-conditioning, business in 1976. He has long been active in the community, including serving as mayor of Tumwater for four years. He helped found the Thurston County Economic Development Council and served several terms on its board, and for 12 years, was chairman of public works in Tumwater. His work on the boards of several South Sound nonprofit organizations includes service with the Olympia Master Builders, Washington Center for the Performing Arts, Knights of Columbus and the Providence St. Peter Foundation. He also has served as a bank director and as a board member for several industry-specific organizations.Andy Hwang ’94Andy Hwang, who graduated with a degree in criminal justice, started a career with law enforcement while still in high school, serving as a police explorer for the Thurston County Sheriff’s Department. Fast forward 30-plus years, and he is now Federal Way Police Chief. Hwang leads 160 employees and manages a $30 million budget, serving 93,000 citizens of Federal Way. Hwang is active in several professional associations and organizations: King County Police Chiefs Association; Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs; International Association of Chiefs of Police. He also serves on the boards of Woodstone Credit Union and Federal Way Advancing Leadership.Ivan Lui-Kwan ’67For more than 40 years, Ivan Lui-Kwan, a graduate in political science, has practiced law in Hawaii, focusing on land use, administrative and real estate law. He is a director of the law firm Starn O’Toole Marcus & Fisher in Honolulu, and has been recognized by the peer-reviewed publication, “Best Lawyers in America®” for administrative/regulatory law and government relations practice. He was named 2015 “Best Lawyers in America®” Lawyer of the Year in government relations practice in Honolulu. Lui-Kwan also was recognized in 2014 with a Lifetime Achievement Award from Pacific Edge Magazine. In 2015, he was a Queen Emma Ball honoree for his many contributions to the St. Andrew’s Schools and the people of Hawaii, and as ambassador for the United States to Maori King Tuheitia and the Maori Tribes of New Zealand.Paula V. Bouwer-Ronshaugen, ’86When Paula Bouwer-Ronshaugen earned her degree in community services in 1986, she was the first Saint Martin’s student with a hearing disability to graduate. She is employed as deaf services manager with Washington Vocational Services, a non-profit staffing agency, where she advocates for clients to potential employers who may have no education or knowledge about how to work with a person with a disability. About 80 percent of those with disabilities she has placed are deaf or hard-of-hearing; the remaining 20 percent have other disabilities.  For more than 20 years, Paula has been lauded as a top job placement specialist in finding employment for people with disabilities in a region that spans from Everett to Tacoma and from Tumwater to Silverdale.Abbot Neal Roth, O.S.B. ’65Abbot Neal Roth, O.S.B., has been an integral part of the Saint Martin’s community for 59 years, and has served as abbot since 1993. Abbot Neal was raised in Yakima and entered Saint Martin’s after high school. After graduating with a degree in secondary education, he continued his education, earning master’s degrees in both education and divinity. For many years, he taught at Saint Martin’s High School and College, as well as serving parishes in the Seattle Archdiocese. As abbot, he is the major superior of the Abbey of St. Martin’s, president of the Saint Martin’s Abbey Corp., chancellor of Saint Martin’s University and a long-standing member of University’s Board of Trustees. His faith in and commitment to the Abbey’s mission to develop and sustain Saint Martin’s University can be seen in the many University events he either participates in or officiates. For Abbot Neal, “The values taught at Saint Martin’s are the values that everyone should have: ethics, service and community.”Jim Swenson HS’74Jim Swenson, of Lacey, has served Saint Martin’s for many years through his work with the Saint Martin’s Alumni Association. He has translated the love he feels for his alma mater into countless volunteer hours spent working in the concessions trailer and the Capital Food and Wine Festival, both of which raise money for scholarships for Saint Martin’s students.Saint Martin’s University is an independent, four-year, coeducational university located on a wooded campus of more than 300 acres in Lacey, Washing­ton. Established in 1895 by the Catholic Order of Saint Benedict, the University is one of 14 Benedic­tine colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, and the only one west of the Rocky Mountains. Saint Martin’s University prepares students for successful lives through its 25 majors and seven graduate programs spanning the liberal arts, business, education, nursing and engineering. Saint Martin’s welcomes more than 1,243 undergraduate students and 277 graduate students from many ethnic and religious backgrounds to its Lacey campus, and 350 more students to its extended campus at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. Visit the Saint Martin’s University website atwww.stmartin.edulast_img read more

Tips for Healthy and Safe Holiday Eating

first_imgFacebook21Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Thurston County Public Health and Social ServicesThe holidays are right around the corner. It can be a stressful time of year and most of us tend to overeat less healthy foods during the holiday season. It’s OK to enjoy your favorite treats during these special times, but if you overdo it you could end up feeling groggy and won’t have enough energy to do all the fun things you want to during this exciting time of year. By eating healthy on most days you will feel good and have more energy to enjoy all the season has to offer. Here are some tips to eating healthier during the holiday season:Don’t skip breakfast. Skipping the most important meal of the day can make you feel overly hungry later in the day which can lead to overeating.Do some physical activity most days of the week. Keeping active will help keep your appetite in check and will also burn some calories from your favorite treats.Bring a healthy dish to the holiday party. That way you know there will be something you can eat that won’t make you feel sluggish later.Don’t linger by the food table at parties. Ever hear the phrase out of sight out of mind?It’s ok to indulge in a few holiday treats. Just balance those treats with healthy options. Photo courtesy: Thurston County Public HealthEnjoy smaller portions of your favorite treats. You don’t have to restrict yourself from the things you love during the holidays. A few bites of your favorite treat will be much more enjoyable than eating it until you feel like a stuffed Thanksgiving turkey.Unfortunately, holiday parties and meals can also be a source of food borne illness. Keep your family and friends safe by using safe cooking practices, including:Clean. Always wash your hands before cooking or serving food; wash produce and fruits under running water before using them; never put cooked food on a plate that previously held raw food.Separate. Keep raw meat, poultry, eggs, and fish away from foods that will not cooked; wash hands, utensils, and cutting boards that had raw meat, poultry, eggs or fish on them with warm water and soap.Enjoy holiday celebrations and keep them safe by ensuring you cook all food, especially meat, completely. Cook. Use a food thermometer to check doneness, especially for meat, poultry, eggs or fish; 145 °F for steak, pork, veal, chops; 160 °F for hamburger; and 165 °F for poultry, combined or stuffed meats, and leftovers.Chill. Put leftovers away in the refrigerator within two hours; use ice to keep foods cold for buffets and parties; chill the serving platter/bowl to help the food stay cool longer.When feeding a crowd, only put out some of the perishable food, resupplying as needed and keeping the rest either hot or cold. This keeps bacteria, which can cause illness, from growing in the food.I hope you can use these tips to have a most pleasant and healthy holiday season.last_img read more