Japan Journal: Avoiding jet lag on the trip to Tokyo for A’s baseball

first_imgTOKYO, Japan — Konnichiwa!That’s about the extent of my knowledge of the Japanese language, unfortunately. But the good news is I have arrived in the land of the rising sun for MLB’s Opening Series between the A’s and Mariners.There are plenty of things I’d like to explore out here and will share with all of you by putting together these journal entries throughout the week.But they say the journey is just as important as the destination and the journey I’m coming off of is quite a unique …last_img

‘Use technology to improve housing’

first_img1 October 2010The Department of Human Settlements is on a quest to find new technologies that are both cost-effective and quality-oriented to provide better housing for poorer South Africans.The technology needs to be environmentally friendly, sustainable and address other challenges facing housing in the country, Human Settlements Minister Tokyo Sexwale said this week during the department’s Alternative Building Technologies Indaba in Johannesburg.The two-day indaba brought together officials from all spheres of government, the private sector, regulatory authorities, scientific, research and tertiary institutions.Sexwale called on delegates to ensure that the indaba was more than just a “talk shop”, urging them to make it a productive working session that would give rise to ideas that could be implemented.Green solutionsSexwale said his department was looking for new ways of building better homes, which included new green solutions and mechanisms for responding to climate change.He elaborated that the department was looking for new ideas on issues such as internal electrification, solar panels, improved sanitation, heating and water reticulation systems, and durable roofing.Technology that benefited people needed to be both cost-effective and sustainable, he said. However, the minister stressed that while the department was cost-conscious and looking for cheaper material, quality would not be compromised.Sexwale added that the focus of his department was to build sustainable human settlements. He described these as places where people “stay, play and pray”. The minister said that this integrated approach was aimed at developing proper suburbs, villages and towns.Rapid urbanisationSexwale said that some old technologies that had produced houses that stood strong over centuries should not be ignored. Modern technology needed to complement and build on century-old initiatives.New technologies should also assist in the identification of available land, the minister added.“Given rapid urbanisation and the rate of population growth, with the diminishing availability of land in relation to the growing number of people, it means we have to apply new technologies to build better homes,” he said.Sexwale said South Africa also needed to pay attention to the experience of other countries such as Malaysia, Singapore, China, Angola and Equatorial Guinea, which have made significant strides in the area of human settlements.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Leslie Century Farm grounded in faith and perseverance

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt ReeseJim Leslie was born in 1928, the youngest of six and 14 years younger than his next oldest brother. Being so much younger, as a boy Jim learned, mostly on his own, the hardships, joys and constant change of life on the Wyandot County farm purchased by his grandparents in 1882.Jim still has scars on his foot from when he disobediently scooted his tricycle through the kitchen and put his foot in the hot, fresh apple butter his mother was making with neighbors. He can remember the community gathering on the farm and butchering for the winter.“We used to butcher here at this farm for the neighborhood. We had a Model A Ford. We’d jack up the rear wheel and put a belt on the spokes of the wheel. We’d start the car, the wheel would turn and that would run the meat grinder,” Jim said. “We’d hang the meat in the summer kitchen. Mom would go out and slice the mold off the outside of the meat to cut out the steaks and cook them. We’d throw the moldy meat she cut off in the pigpen. People today wouldn’t eat that meat, but if you want a pretty good steak, that was good stuff.”The days of his youth went slowly, but the years flew by, as did the changes on the farm through the last century.“The farm is one field today, but at that time it was in six fields. We had a hog lot, we had a cattle lot and a woods with a pond in it. We had a well clear in the back so we could water the sheep. The cows were sold when my brother was in high school,” Jim said. “I can remember when they wired the house for electricity. I was in the fifth or sixth grade. We had one light in the kitchen on a wire that hung down from the ceiling, the same thing in the living room and one plug-in in the kitchen. I was sick home from school the day they turned the electric on and the lights came on in the house. That was a big deal. I can remember when they put the indoor plumbing in too. I was out of high school then. I didn’t enjoy running out to the outhouse in December. It was no fun to clean that thing out either. The first radio we had ran on batteries and that was a big deal too, but we only could get one or two stations.”As much older siblings moved away from home, Jim took on more of the farm duties, especially after eighth grade when he got a Ford Ferguson tractor and a plow for Christmas.“We owned 80 acres and rented other ground to get 220 acres. There were a lot of late nights and early mornings,” Jim said. “If you got 20 acres a day plowed with that Ford tractor that was a big deal from morning to night. Now our lawnmower has more horsepower than that Ford tractor.”Jim’s father died when he was a senior in high school. It was just Jim and his mother at home. Times were tough, but Jim made it work as he took over the farm. The farm was rented out to cousins for a couple of years while Jim was in the service, stationed in Germany in the 1950s. Jim came home and the first thing he did was buy a farm.“When I came home from the service, this farm was for sale at an auction. I paid cash and used all my money. Then I couldn’t get a loan to buy the seed and fertilizer. I was up a creek without a paddle,” he said. “I ran into a friend who worked with farm credit and they loaned me the money to plant crops.”In 1957, Jim married Dorothy, a farmer’s daughter from southeast of Columbus.“When we got married, we looked at the house on the farm I’d just bought and Dorothy said that we’d need to do something to the house before we lived in it,” Jim said. “So, we sold her car and put a roof on it.”Their first years together on the farm were tough, and many people had doubts about whether the Leslies could prevail. Jim’s mother still lived at the home farm, but was getting elderly and needed care as well.“The first couple of years were tight,” Dorothy said. “The first year we were married was the only year we didn’t get everything planted. It rained and rained and rained. I would go out barefooted to pick the garden because it was too muddy to wear shoes. We were on our own. Either we made it or we broke it. We had no family to help us. It was do or die for us. We were going to make it go or try something else.”Even when the crops didn’t grow, the bills had to be paid.“My mom didn’t have any income except for the farm. I bought the farm from her so she had that money and we took care of her. Dorothy is a registered nurse and she kept us in business for a while,” Jim said. There were a couple of years there that lenders told us we should maybe look at different options of things to do, but we got the job done. There wasn’t a choice. We just did it. With Dorothy’s help, things worked out. I can’t stress that enough.”After years of constant toil on the farm, things finally started looking up and Jim was really coming into his own as a farmer in 1965. It was late winter of that year though, when life took another challenging turn that set the stage for the future of the farm.“I was driving home from bowling on the church bowling team one night. A drunk ran me off the road and I rolled the pickup truck multiple times. There were no seat belts in those days. My back was badly hurt and my scalp was peeled open and laid over,” Jim said. “I was too injured to plant the crop that spring. It was pretty discouraging.”The Leslie’s previous perseverance on the farm, though, had made an impression on the community.“Our ag credit manager asked me what we were going to do. I told him I wasn’t sure, and a few days later he came out and worked the ground and planted oats for us. That same year, around 20 farmers in the community got together, brought all of their own equipment and helped plant everything else for us all in one day. There were so many tractors out here. We were buying fuel from the Marathon Corporation at that time and they supplied the fuel for the tractors that day. I never got a bill for the fuel that was used. The wives all fixed dinner. We set up tables in the backyard and all of the wives made food. They stopped for lunch and at about 6:00 they were done planting everything,” Jim said. “The Ford dealer in Upper Sandusky even brought out a little Ranger so I could drive around the farm and see everything. Another neighbor came out a day early to get stuff all lined up.”That day changed the farm, and the farmers.“They didn’t expect anything back,” Dorothy said. “How do you thank someone who does that for you? Farmers still do that today. I don’t know how many places do that anymore.”“I vowed after that that I would help everybody else out. I never made it around to help everybody, but I have gotten the chance to help many of them. We have tried to help families in a lot of ways, but we don’t like to make a lot of to-do about it,” Jim said. “It gave us a boost and we managed to pay our bills that year. I was still wearing a body brace for harvest that fall and I had some part-time help come in. I don’t remember how the crops were, but we paid the bills and had money to put out the next crop. We were able to rent more ground after that and grow the farm.“It went from an old general farm to a commercial farm. Every year there is always something new and the last 10 years things have really changed. Now you need a book to know how to run this equipment. The physical stress now is a lot less. The technology has been a big thing. No-till has been a big change too. We plant all of our soybeans and wheat in no-till and there is minimal tillage for the corn. No-till has been a godsend for us. I’ll be 91 in October and I’m still able to go out and run the tractor and do a lot of work. That is where the technology has come in. If I had to do things the way we used to do them, I couldn’t do it. It has been a miracle. The combine cab is air conditioned and it drives itself.”The Leslies have four boys and three of them live nearby and work on the farm.“The farm is a good place to raise children. They learn responsibility and accountability, even though you get tired you don’t quit, you just persevere until the job is done,” Dorothy said. “Watching the sun rise and set with family leaves a lasting impression on all of us.”With rented ground, the farm expanded to over 2,000 acres through the years. This spring was the first since 1957 where some of the farm’s acres were left unplanted because of wet weather. The Leslies know they have been lucky, but there is more to a successful Century Farm than luck.Jim said looking at Dorothy with the sincerest of grins, “You need a wife that’ll stick with you.”Dorothy returned the grin and said, “You have to have faith. He said He will give a time to plant and a time to harvest. Where there is a challenge, you can’t just give up. That faith and persistence has worked for us all these years.”In May of 1965 farmers from around the community came to help get the Leslie’s crop planted after Jim was injured in an automobile accident. In this picture they are taking a break for lunch.last_img read more

Paving Roads With Recycled Plastic

first_imgA Scottish startup company has developed a method for supplementing conventional bitumen asphalt with pellets of recycled plastic, producing a stronger and more durable pavement.MacRebur describes MR6 as a high-performance asphalt binder additive that reduces the amount of bitumen needed to make asphalt, simultaneously reducing the amount of oil going into pavement and finding a use for the millions of pounds of waste plastic that now go into landfills every year.According to the company, pavement made with the material has higher tensile strength than conventional asphalt, better cohesion and adhesion and much better resistance to rutting and cracking. As a result, roads last longer and cost less to maintain.The company’s Facebook page features a number of photos of paving projects, but it’s not clear how much of the asphalt has actually been turned into roads. MacRebur says it’s target market are the 275 asphalt plants in the UK and nearly 5,000 across Europe. It already has agreements in place with several smaller UK asphalt producers.“MR6 can be added into every ton of asphalt produced without any modifications being required by the asphalt manufacturing plants,” the company website says. “MR6 allows for less bitumen to be added to their mix, giving the manufacturer instant increased profits from all current and future business.”MacRebur isn’t the only company using plastic in road mix. Inhabitat reports that the city of Vancouver is paving its streets with asphalt containing a binder made from recycled plastic. The mix is said to flow at lower temperatures than conventional asphalt and doesn’t look any different than ordinary pavement. The process adds 1% to 3% in costs, but could get cheaper as its use becomes more widespread.And Motortrend reports that a Dutch company is developing a way of producing hollow-core road sections from recycled plastics. The material lasts three times as long as conventional pavement, VolkerWessels says.last_img read more

Amazon Announces Verification Service To Be Your One True Login

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#Amazon#now readwrite A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img Related Posts Amazon is joining Google, Facebook and Twitter as companies that want to be your one true login. Today Amazon announced “Login with Amazon,” a service that will allow people to sign into websites, apps and games with their Amazon credentials instead of having to remember a unique password.Login with Amazon will be based on the OAuth 2.0 authorization framework, similar to what other companies use for verification services. Amazon has been testing the login solution with two of its owned properties, Zappos and Woot, and says that 40% of new customers to those sites decided to use Amazon as the login method of choice. Amazon is positioning Login with Amazon as a developer tool to integrate into their websites and apps. As it is based on the near-universal OAuth 2.0 protocol, Login with Amazon will work with both iOS and Android as well as websites. The service will be free to developers.  8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

ISL: Mumbai City FC beat FC Pune City to earn bragging rights in Maharashtra derby

first_imgMumbai City FC got their first win in this year’s Indian Super League (ISL) and they did it in style by putting away their local opponents FC Pune City in the Maharashtra derby.Modou Sougou’s 25th minute strike and a penalty from Rafael Bastos in the 45th minute was enough to seal Mumbai’s 2-0 win over Pune at the Mumbai Football Arena on Friday.Mumabi drew first blood after an uneventful start to the game when Senegal’s Sougou clinically finished a close range effort from aulo Machado’s cross, which had rebounded off the crossbar.At the other end, Emiliano Alfaro was starting to look threatening for Pune and the Uruguayan vociferously appealed for a penalty after going down under Subhashish Bose’s challenge, to no avail.However, a spot-kick would be awarded at the other end eventually in the dying minutes of the first session. A scrappy phase of play found Mumbai’s attackers with a numerical advantage over Pune’s defenders. Bastos attempted to set Sougou through on goal but the Senegalese was brought down by a challenge from behind from Chhuantea Fanai.The referee had no hesitation in blowing his whistle for a penalty. Bastos stepped up for the penalty and made no mistake from the spot, sending Vishal Kaith the wrong way..@MumbaiCityFC picked up their first win of the season, courtesy two first-half goals by Modou Sougou and Rafael Bastos.More videos: https://t.co/mrtZlxvu6i #ISLRecap #LetsFootball #MUMPUN #FanBannaPadega pic.twitter.com/G6v6xseHKlIndian Super League (@IndSuperLeague) October 19, 2018Pune came out with some much-needed urgency after the break. However, it were the hosts who should have extended their lead around the hour mark when Machado surged forward on a mesmerising run. The Portuguese’s attempt after cutting in from the left flew inches wide off the target.advertisementMiguel Angel Portugal threw on Marcelinho as he sought to get his side back into the game and the Brazilian almost made an instant impact with a snapshot from the edge of the area where Amrinder Singh was alert enough.Alfaro almost reduced the deficit in the 65th minute with a sharp turn and shot in the 65th minute following a cross from Golui. But his effort agonisingly scraped the crossbar before going out of play.Jorge Costa shored up the hosts’ defence as they looked to protect their two-goal lead with Pune’s attackers being thwarted repeatedly despite coming forward in numbers.Arnold Issoko put in a resilient performance throughout 90 minutes and even won a penalty for his team in the second half. He is the Hero of the Match!#HeroISL #LetsFootball #FanBannaPadega pic.twitter.com/qUg5UxDGOTIndian Super League (@IndSuperLeague) October 19, 2018There would be another spot-kick awarded in added time, once again to the hosts. A quick breakaway saw Arnold Sissoko skip past the Pune defence before he was hacked down in the box by Gurtej Singh. Lucian Goian stepped up to take the penalty but his effort was saved well by Kaith who guessed the right way.(With inputs from IANS)last_img read more

Recorded Books Unveils Revolutionary New RBdigital App

first_imgAdvertisement LANDOVER, Md., June 22, 2017 — Recorded Books, an RBmedia company, today announced the launch of RBdigital™ — bringing together libraries’ top-circulating digital media into a single mobile app. The functionality in both OneClickdigital™ and Zinio™ for Libraries — two leading library lending apps currently in use by thousands of libraries around the world — is now seamlessly merged into the new RBdigital app.“We’re proud to be the first to make audiobooks, magazines, and eBooks available in one location on mobile devices,” says Tom MacIsaac, Chief Executive Officer of RBmedia. “This new unified app provides the best mobile experience in the industry. With RBdigital, library patrons will find it easier than ever before to discover and access their favorite content on their smartphones and tablets.”The all-new RBdigital app delivers:Exclusive audiobooks — only RBdigital delivers access to the Recorded Books proprietary catalog, including thousands of premium audiobooks as well as a broad array of other spoken audio content.The largest collection of digital magazines — including complete, downloadable, full-color digital editions (many with interactive features).Best-selling and award-winning eBooks by top authors.An extensive list of new features — including easier navigation, enhanced search, in-app previews, and easier checkouts and renewals. Login/Register With: Advertisement “The RBdigital app enables us to offer a great collection to our patrons. They will appreciate the one-stop experience of checking out and reading items in the same app,” says Melody Dworak, Collections Librarian, Iowa City Public Library.To make it as easy as possible for libraries to adopt the new app, Recorded Books also offers live training webinars to get new users up to speed, as well as free technical support for patrons and library staff.AvailabilityRBdigital will be generally available on June 27. Mobile apps are available for iOS®, Android™, and Kindle Fire™. Get a sneak peek of the new RBdigital app at the ALA Annual Conference in Chicago, June 22-27.  Libraries can stop by the Recorded Books Booth #4029 to give the app a try and sign up for a 30-day free trial of any RBdigital service.About Recorded BooksRecorded Books, an RBmedia company, is the largest independent publisher of unabridged audiobooks in the world, with a catalog of more than 30,000 exclusive titles narrated by award-winning actors. Beyond the highest-quality audiobooks, Recorded Books also delivers eBooks, eMagazines, movies, learning programs, and much more to consumers and to the retail, professional, school, library, and infotainment markets. The company’s RBdigital platform provides a vast array of digital content to millions of consumers worldwide.About RBmediaRBmedia is a global leader in spoken audio content and digital media distribution technology that reaches millions of consumers – at home, in the car, and wherever their mobile devices take them. RBmedia produces exclusive titles and delivers the finest digital content – including audiobooks, educational courses, entertainment titles, and much more. Headquartered in Landover, Maryland, RBmedia comprises an ever-expanding group of the best brands in spoken audio content and digital media distribution technology. Find out more at www.rbmediaglobal.com. Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Twitterlast_img read more