Watson driving Boyz forward with his ‘A’ game

first_img Ja’s first final PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania: JE-VAUGHN WATSON has embraced his role as one of the key players for Jamaica at the CONCACAF Gold Cup. The central midfielder is a senior member in the Jamaica set-up, who has been covering a lot of ground while playing a two-way role at the tournament, which climaxes with a clash against Mexico in the final at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia tomorrow. “Playing for the country, that alone is a big motivation. To put on the green, gold and black that gives us a big motivation for a big tournament,” he said. “Playing in the Gold Cup against quality teams like the United States you’ve to bring your ‘A’ game.” Jamaica’s place in the final is historical, as they had never been farther than the semis – in 1993 when they finished joint third and 1998 when they placed fourth. On Wednesday at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, that stat went out the window, with Watson, who his teammates call ‘Hacker’, working off his socks in a 2-1 victory for the Jamaicans. “Before the game the players said ‘Je-Vaughn you didn’t play the last game. We know your potential, we know what you can do, anytime you play the team plays well’,” noting their call for him to step up to the plate. “It means a lot to me to know that you’re playing for your country and you’re a vital player in the team and guys look forward to you – players who can give a lot of energy for the team, whether in offence or defence. That’s not a pressure. I take it as a blessing to represent your country like that. “I’ve got the mentality going in the game that I’ve to be the one to move the ball to both sides. I’ve to be the one to break up and stuff, so I guess it worked out well,” he pointed out. “We had one of the best games of the tournament. We beat a good US team that everybody wanted to win the game. But, we went out there and showed a lot of guts and determination and we came away winners. “I feel so good I didn’t even sleep last night (Wednesday). I felt like I was dreaming. But at the end of the day we knew we were a better team than them. We knew that if we went out there and played then we would give a good game,” he added. “We’ve one more game to go, the celebrations, it’s over now … and it’s back to work again.”last_img read more

Researchers identify sterility genes in hybrid rice

first_imgThey identified three genes that contribute to the sterility in a “killer-protector” system that determines whether or not spores are formed. They found that Open Reading Frame (ORF) 5+ (killer) produces a protein that ORF 4+ influences to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the spore-producing cells, while a third gene, ORF 3+ (protector), produces a protein in response to the stress that counteracts it and protects the ER. The japonica variety has a different form of the gene, ORF 3-, which means that the hybrids often carry a muted ORF gene that is unable to protect against the hybrid’s more potent form of the killer ORF 5+, often resulting in premature death at the embryo-sac stage in the hybrid.The researchers explained in their paper in Science that a potent combination of ORF 4+ and ORF 5+ would allow genetic differentiation of the two subspecies and prevent genes being passed on, while a potent ORF 3+ and weaker combinations of the killer genes would allow hybrids to be fertile and genes to flow to the next generation.The findings add to the understanding of hybrid sterility, a process that restricts the flow of genes between populations, lead author Qifa Zhang said. He added that understanding the cause of the sterility may allow scientists to overcome it, and this could help in the development of more desirable and higher-yielding cultivated rice crops. Journal information: Science This image shows heterosis and sterility of hybrid between indica and japonica subspecies in rice. Credit: Jiangyi Yang and Qifa Zhang (Phys.org)—Hybrids of many plant and animal species and subspecies are sterile, and a group of researchers in China have now identified the genes that operate to make crossbred rice sterile. This image shows heterosis and sterility of hybrid between indica and japonica subspecies. Credit: Qifa Zhang The scientists, from the National Centre of Plant Gene Research at Huazhong Agricultural University in Wuhan and the Chinese University of Hong Kong, examined two subspecies of the cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.), japonica and indica, and identified three genes that act together to regulate fertility in these hybrids. Japonica is a common variety of sticky short-grain rice also known as Japanese rice, sinica or sushi rice, and indica is a non-sticky long-grain rice. Both varieties are thought to have been first domesticated in Central China around eight thousand years ago, and from there they spread throughout Asia. When crossbred the hybrids tend to be more vigorous than the parent subspecies and can yield significantly larger crops of rice.The researchers used techniques such as gene sequencing and genotyping to analyze the genetics of hybrid indica-japonica rice in the region of a specific locus (S5) that had previously been shown to be involved in sterility in hybrids. They then compared their findings with genes in that region in other rice varieties, including Nanjing 11 (a subspecies of indica), Balilla (subspecies of japonica), and varieties producing fertile crossbred offspring: Dular and 02428. © 2012 Phys.orgcenter_img Explore further More information: A Killer-Protector System Regulates Both Hybrid Sterility and Segregation Distortion in Rice, Science, 14 September 2012: Vol. 337 no. 6100 pp. 1336-1340. DOI: 10.1126/science.1223702ABSTRACTHybrid sterility is a major form of postzygotic reproductive isolation that restricts gene flow between populations. Cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) consists of two subspecies, indica and japonica; inter-subspecific hybrids are usually sterile. We show that a killer-protector system at the S5 locus encoded by three tightly linked genes [Open Reading Frame 3 (ORF3) to ORF5] regulates fertility in indica-japonica hybrids. During female sporogenesis, the action of ORF5+ (killer) and ORF4+ (partner) causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ORF3+ (protector) prevents ER stress and produces normal gametes, but ORF3– cannot prevent ER stress, resulting in premature programmed cell death and leads to embryo-sac abortion. Preferential transmission of ORF3+ gametes results in segregation distortion in the progeny. These results add to our understanding of differences between indica and japonica rice and may aid in rice genetic improvement. Early agricultural piracy informs the domestication of rice Citation: Researchers identify sterility genes in hybrid rice (2012, September 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-09-sterility-genes-hybrid-rice.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more