Portrayals of sports riots, current protests sharply differ

first_imgTurner said that since the current protests are, by nature, in opposition to the police, the authority of police departments to properly handle crowd control is under question — which may only add to the tension. But these sports riots extend from coast to coast, even in recent history. After the San Francisco Giants won the World Series in 2014, fans smashed the windows of police cars and buses as part of a larger scene of vandalism and bonfires. By the end of the night, two people had been shot and one had been stabbed.   As predicted, the slippery substance proved necessary. After the underdog Eagles beat the New England Patriots 41-33, the city of Philadelphia flared up as fans flooded the streets in joy. However, byproducts of their enjoyment were destructive acts such as flipping cars, starting fires and vandalizing buildings.  “Basically, it was portrayed as a celebration that went awry as opposed to a riot, but in actuality, in the definition of a riot, it was a riot,” Turner said of the 2018 Philadelphia celebrations. “Property was destroyed, there was vandalism, there was looting.”  A New York Times piece shared a similar sentiment, using “rowdy” as well as “unruly” to describe the celebrations. News outlet Quartz described the fans’ actions as “all-destructive joy.” “Even when it’s just a peaceful situation, the police are on guard,” Turner said of the current protests. “They’ve got their hands on their hips, their hands on their revolvers, because they’re expecting something to pop up.” “It’s partly a matter of broadening the attitudes of everybody who’s out there working, doing news,” Messner said. “But I think it’s also important to recognize that we do need to continue to move toward more diversity in the newsroom.” Daniel Durbin, a communication professor at USC, echoed that sentiment, adding that there’s not a “larger social picture” behind sports fans’ violent actions. At the time, media outlets downplayed this destruction. On ABC’s “Good Morning America,” former NFL player and GMA co-host Michael Strahan simply called the fans “rowdy,” softening the extent of the damage they caused to the city. He, alongside the other hosts, were smiling throughout the broadcast, implying that the fans’ actions were acceptable.  In the past 20 years, Boston has seen riots whenever the Red Sox won the World Series, resulting in fires, flipped cars and fights with police. In 1984 after the Tigers brought home the World Series championship, Detroit faced similar riots as fans looted and burned police vehicles. After the Lakers won the NBA Finals in 2000, fans started fires and damaged police cars.  “Basically, they did a wide shot of the crowd just so you could see how many people were there and then close-ups on people who were just celebrating,” Turner said of the 2018 Philadelphia riots. “[Destruction was] not something that they focused on, and what you saw in Philadelphia is that you saw more context.” During the 2020 protests against police brutality after the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, much media coverage has focused on the destruction that ensues. For instance, an NBC News broadcast stated that the “nation erupted into scenes of chaos, violence and widespread destruction,” focusing on the dangers these protests pose to cities across the nation.  But the violence and chaos that ensued in Philadelphia that night is similar to what is predominantly portrayed of current Black Lives Matter protests in mainstream media. According to USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism assistant professor of professional practice Miki Turner, media outlets have a habit of downplaying the result of chaotic championship celebrations.center_img Ali Pearl, a postdoctoral fellow at USC whose research deals with race and culture, discussed the importance of acknowledging the different reasons for violence with sports fans and Black Lives Matter protesters. This context, she said, is key in understanding why sports rioting and protesting against police brutality are two completely different stories despite occasional similar acts of violence. Looting, arson and property destruction all unfolded in the Bay Area shortly after the San Francisco Giants won the 2014 World Series. (Photo via Eazydee | Twitter) Turner, an award-winning photojournalist, also illustrated how the images depicted by the media in these riots differ.  The article suggested newsroom diversity could help facilitate unbiased language when covering protests. Sociology and gender studies professor Michael Messner said it comes down to not only increasing newsroom diversity but being receptive as reporters to learning about and covering different communities. The country has witnessed other similar violent and destructive acts occur in some of its major sports cities. But these riots don’t occur in support of diversity in sports, equal pay among male and female athletes or other social issues — instead, fans tear up their town to celebrate a win or mourn a loss. “I actually understand the impulse toward property destruction when you are protesting police brutality, when you’re protesting injustice, because you’re targeting the material products of a system that maintained inequality,” Pearl said. “When you are just celebrating or lamenting a sports win or loss, I don’t actually understand the impulse toward property destruction in that moment. There’s not a target to that impulse, it’s more of a release of energy.” Turner also noted how the circumstances of these riots could cause law enforcement to react differently to different crowds. The San Francisco Police Department reported only a “handful” of arrests after the city’s 2014 celebration. After the Chicago Cubs won the 2016 World Series and chaos ensued, 14 arrests were made in Wrigleyville. “Even if you don’t choose to take it up, there’s a moral call to protest or to support [Black Lives Matter] protesters that goes across social and political lines,” Durbin said. “There’s no social or moral imperative to your team winning the Super Bowl or the NBA championship.” In an academic journal titled Equality, Diversity and Inclusion, researchers analyzed the rhetoric used by mainstream news outlets when covering the 2014 Black Lives Matter protests in Ferguson, Mo. The journal predominantly found language referring to the lawless nature of the protests, as well as inflammatory quotes from police and an emphasis on the violence that ensued. On the morning of Super Bowl LII, the city of Philadelphia took to the streets in anticipation of celebrating who would become the 2018 NFL champion Eagles. It wasn’t the typical procedure of putting up barricades or cleaning the streets for fans — city employees coated light poles with hydraulic fluid to prevent celebrators from climbing them.  For comparison, 20 people were arrested in San Francisco last Tuesday for violating curfew, and in the last nine days, Chicago has seen more than 2,500 arrests related to civil unrest. last_img read more

Man United vs Tottenham: Matic and Valencia start, plus full confirmed teams

first_img Every Championship club’s best signing of the decade, including Taarabt and Dack Getty highlights Best clips, calls and talkSPORT moments of 2019, feat Hearn, McCoist and more Spurs have opened up their season with two wins from two, although were given a scare by Fulham last week.But their record at the Theatre of Dreams is poor, losing their last five games here.What time is kick-off?The Premier League’s Monday Night Football offering, this one will take place on August 27.Last season in this fixture a late Anthony Martial strike sank Spurs 1-0.Which TV channel can I watch it on?You can tune into Sky Sports Premier League, Main Event and Ultra HD to watch this one.Coverage starts at 7pm.Stream the action on Sky Go if you are a Sky Sports subscriber.talkSPORT will also bring you regular updates from Old Trafford. gameday smart causal 1 Tonight’s #MUFC team for #MUNTOT! pic.twitter.com/nWDEHt9V9h— Manchester United (@ManUtd) August 27, 2018 impact possible standings Jose Mourinho’s Manchester United face their biggest test of the Premier League season so far as Tottenham travel to Old Trafford.After last week’s embarrassing defeat to Brighton, the pressure is on the Red Devils to find their swagger in front of an expectant home crowd. How the Premier League table could change after the Boxing Day fixtures Tottenham v Brighton LIVE: talkSPORT commentary and team news for Boxing Day opener Every current Premier League club’s best kit from the past decade Mourinho was furious with his sides performance lats week silverware England’s most successful clubs of the past decade, according to trophies won What is the team news?Alexis Sanchez is only fit enough for a place on the bench, but Mourinho welcomes back Nemanja Matic, Ander Herrera and captain Antonio Valencia to the starting XI.For Spurs, Heung-Min Son will continue his absence due to South Korea’s progression through the Asian Games and Danny Rose comes in for Ben Davies.Confirmed teams:  FOOTBALL LATEST #THFC: Lloris (C), Trippier, Alderweireld, Vertonghen, Rose, Dier, Dembele, Eriksen, Lucas, Dele, Kane.Latest odds from @WilliamHill 👉 https://t.co/d1e45RfXmH#COYS pic.twitter.com/YnlHB0r5HZ— Tottenham Hotspur (@SpursOfficial) August 27, 2018last_img read more