Nintendos Mario Kart mobile game delayed until summer

first_img Share your voice Mario Kart Tour won’t out for a while yet, but doesn’t just seeing Mario Kart 64 make you feel better? Nintendo Mario Kart Tour won’t launch until this summer, Nintendo announced Thursday.The kart racing game was due to speed onto mobile devices by the end of March, but the Japanese company wrote in its latest earnings report and its Twitter account that it’s taking a few more months to improve the application’s quality and expand the post-launch content offerings. Playing the beloved racing series on our phones and tablets is an exciting prospect, but Nintendo Life notes that Mario Kart Tour remains pretty mysterious — we haven’t yet seen any footage or many concrete details.Shortly after it was announced, we heard it’d be a free-to-start app and Nintendo said in a previous earnings report that it’ll operate “a service” for Mario Kart Tour — implying regular updates and changes to keep it fresh.If you absolutely must get your Nintendo fix on mobile, you can try out Dragalia Lost, Super Mario Run, Fire Emblem Heroes and Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp. Walmart Review • Nintendo Switch review: Pure fun on a big-screen TV or on the go Mentioned Above Nintendo Switch (Gray) See It 3:15 Now playing: Watch this: Nintendo Switch: Pure fun on a big-screen TV or on the go.Gaming: All of our video game coverage. スマートフォン向けアプリ『マリオカート ツアー』は、アプリの品質向上および配信後のサービス内容拡充のため、配信予定を2019年夏とさせていただきます。 pic.twitter.com/YhtI2DWw4H— 任天堂株式会社 (@Nintendo) January 31, 2019 See It Preview • Nintendo Switch: All the latest details $299 Post a comment See It $309 0center_img Nintendo Switch Nintendo Video Games Mobile Apps Phones $299 Mario Kart 8 Deluxe is the first great multiplayer game… CNET may get a commission from retail offers. News • Are you a Nintendo Switch docker or hander? $289 29 Photos Tags See it Best Buy Amazon Nintendo sold 9.41 million Switch consoles in the last three months on 2018, Engadget highlighted, which brings its lifetime sales to 32.27 million — just 660,000 short of the Nintendo 64 and far more than the GameCube and Wii U. It still has a ways to go to catch up with the Wii’s 101.63 million though.The earnings report also highlighted the success of some big hitters on Nintendo Switch — Super Smash Bros Ultimate sold 12.08 million copies after coming out in December, Pokémon: Let’s Go shifted 10 million after its November release, while Super Mario Party moved a comparatively modest 5.3 million units since October. The 29 best games on the Nintendo Switch How To • How to transfer your Nintendo Switch account to a new Switch V2last_img read more

Parvin killed trying to save husband from mosque shooting

first_imgHosne Ara ParvinDesperately looking for her physically-challenged husband, she started rushing to the male section of the mosque from the female one as soon as the attacker started shooting worshippers indiscriminately.However, she was shot before reaching her husband and died instantly.According to UNB, Hosne Ara Parvin, 42, who along with 48 other people was killed in the deadly attacks on two mosques in Christchurch of New Zealand, laid down her life while trying to protect her husband Farid Uddin who is unable to move on his own, said her family members in Sylhet.Apart from Parvin, there are two other Bangladeshis among those killed in the terror attacks. They are Lincoln University teacher Abdus Samad and his wife Kishowara. The couple along with their two children had been living in New Zealand for the last five years.Samad, from Madhur Hailla village in Nageswari upazila of Kurigram, was a teacher of Bangladesh Agricultural University. Taking early retirement, he went to New Zealand five years back.Quoting relatives living in New Zealand, Parvin’s elder sister Raushon Ara Begum said Parvin taking her husband on a wheelchair had gone to the mosque to offer Jum’a prayers around 15 minutes before the mass shootings began around 1:45pm, local time.After dropping Farid at the male section of the mosque, she went to the female section.Parvin, from Jangalhata village of Golapganj upazila in Sylhet, rushed off the female section as soon as she heard the sounds of shootings in a desperate bid to protect her husband. However, she was shot by the attacker and died on the spot.A pall of gloom descended on the village following the death of the Bangladeshi woman in the shootings.Meanwhile, Farid of Chakgram village in Biswanath upazila of the district escaped the attack as some devotees took him out of the mosque. He is now staying with his relatives in Christchurch, Raushon Ara said.Officer-in-charge of Golapganj police station AKM Fazlul Haque Shibli said they visited Parvin’s house and talked to her relatives.last_img read more

Researchers identify sterility genes in hybrid rice

first_imgThey identified three genes that contribute to the sterility in a “killer-protector” system that determines whether or not spores are formed. They found that Open Reading Frame (ORF) 5+ (killer) produces a protein that ORF 4+ influences to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the spore-producing cells, while a third gene, ORF 3+ (protector), produces a protein in response to the stress that counteracts it and protects the ER. The japonica variety has a different form of the gene, ORF 3-, which means that the hybrids often carry a muted ORF gene that is unable to protect against the hybrid’s more potent form of the killer ORF 5+, often resulting in premature death at the embryo-sac stage in the hybrid.The researchers explained in their paper in Science that a potent combination of ORF 4+ and ORF 5+ would allow genetic differentiation of the two subspecies and prevent genes being passed on, while a potent ORF 3+ and weaker combinations of the killer genes would allow hybrids to be fertile and genes to flow to the next generation.The findings add to the understanding of hybrid sterility, a process that restricts the flow of genes between populations, lead author Qifa Zhang said. He added that understanding the cause of the sterility may allow scientists to overcome it, and this could help in the development of more desirable and higher-yielding cultivated rice crops. Journal information: Science This image shows heterosis and sterility of hybrid between indica and japonica subspecies in rice. Credit: Jiangyi Yang and Qifa Zhang (Phys.org)—Hybrids of many plant and animal species and subspecies are sterile, and a group of researchers in China have now identified the genes that operate to make crossbred rice sterile. This image shows heterosis and sterility of hybrid between indica and japonica subspecies. Credit: Qifa Zhang The scientists, from the National Centre of Plant Gene Research at Huazhong Agricultural University in Wuhan and the Chinese University of Hong Kong, examined two subspecies of the cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.), japonica and indica, and identified three genes that act together to regulate fertility in these hybrids. Japonica is a common variety of sticky short-grain rice also known as Japanese rice, sinica or sushi rice, and indica is a non-sticky long-grain rice. Both varieties are thought to have been first domesticated in Central China around eight thousand years ago, and from there they spread throughout Asia. When crossbred the hybrids tend to be more vigorous than the parent subspecies and can yield significantly larger crops of rice.The researchers used techniques such as gene sequencing and genotyping to analyze the genetics of hybrid indica-japonica rice in the region of a specific locus (S5) that had previously been shown to be involved in sterility in hybrids. They then compared their findings with genes in that region in other rice varieties, including Nanjing 11 (a subspecies of indica), Balilla (subspecies of japonica), and varieties producing fertile crossbred offspring: Dular and 02428. © 2012 Phys.orgcenter_img Explore further More information: A Killer-Protector System Regulates Both Hybrid Sterility and Segregation Distortion in Rice, Science, 14 September 2012: Vol. 337 no. 6100 pp. 1336-1340. DOI: 10.1126/science.1223702ABSTRACTHybrid sterility is a major form of postzygotic reproductive isolation that restricts gene flow between populations. Cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) consists of two subspecies, indica and japonica; inter-subspecific hybrids are usually sterile. We show that a killer-protector system at the S5 locus encoded by three tightly linked genes [Open Reading Frame 3 (ORF3) to ORF5] regulates fertility in indica-japonica hybrids. During female sporogenesis, the action of ORF5+ (killer) and ORF4+ (partner) causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ORF3+ (protector) prevents ER stress and produces normal gametes, but ORF3– cannot prevent ER stress, resulting in premature programmed cell death and leads to embryo-sac abortion. Preferential transmission of ORF3+ gametes results in segregation distortion in the progeny. These results add to our understanding of differences between indica and japonica rice and may aid in rice genetic improvement. Early agricultural piracy informs the domestication of rice Citation: Researchers identify sterility genes in hybrid rice (2012, September 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-09-sterility-genes-hybrid-rice.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more