RIP: Arthur E. Walmsley, 12th bishop of Connecticut

first_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls October 6, 2017 at 3:35 pm I am saddened to hear of the death of Bishop Walmsley. I had the good fortune of getting to know him & working with him while I served as director of All Saint’s Conference Center in the early ’90’s.He was kind, generous, caring and brilliant, and I am a better person for having known him. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME People Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA RIP: Arthur E. Walmsley, 12th bishop of Connecticut Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments are closed. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ October 6, 2017 at 6:19 pm Arthur was a wonderful colleague, and an understanding and wise Bishop of Connecticut where I served for 14 great years. I shall miss him! Condolences to Roberta and their family. Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Posted Oct 6, 2017 Phillip Ayers says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Obituary, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY House of Bishops, October 9, 2017 at 11:13 am I have warm memories of Arthur and I am grateful both for his visionary leadership on social justice issues and for his dedication to the inner life of prayer and spiritual growth. God bless you, Arthur. I send my sympathy and condolences to Roberta and their family. Associate Rector Columbus, GA October 6, 2017 at 2:18 pm Carolyn and I give thanks for Arthur’s life and ministry and send our love to Roberta. Margaret Bullitt-Jonas says: Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release [Episcopal News Service] The Rt. Rev. Arthur E. Walmsley, 12th bishop diocesan of the Episcopal Church in Connecticut, died peacefully at his home in Deering, New Hampshire, early Oct. 5.Walmsley had been struggling with a bad case of pneumonia for the last few weeks.  He had recently returned home from the hospital and was being cared for by his loving wife and companion in ministry, Roberta. He was 89 years old.Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas called Walmsley “a visionary and passionate Christian leader.”Walmsley was elected bishop coadjutor of the Episcopal Church in Connecticut while rector of St. Paul’s in New Haven and served in that role from 1979 to 1981 before becoming bishop diocesan in 1981. He retired in 1993.Walmsley helped the Episcopal Church in Connecticut move forward in new ways in God’s mission, particularly in these areas: social justice, urban ministry, care for individuals living with HIV-AIDS, refugee and immigrant services, and racial reconciliation, Douglas said.“His love for Camp Washington and fundraising efforts advanced the ministry of Transfiguration Lodge,” Douglas wrote in an email to the diocese. “And it was his vision that led Church Home of Hartford to become Seabury retirement community in Bloomfield. Arthur, together with Roberta, cared deeply for the clergy and their families in Connecticut as pastor and counselor.”Walmsley will be remembered, “not only for his profound and far-reaching ministry in Connecticut, but also for his work in ecumenical affairs, social justice and racial reconciliation,” according to Douglas. Walmsley’s work occurred in a variety of positions, including in what was then the Department of Social Relations at the Episcopal Church Center in New York and as director of the Massachusetts Council of Churches.After resigning as bishop diocesan, Walmsley had a vocation as a spiritual director for lay people and clergy alike, as episcopal visitor to the Society of St. John the Evangelist in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and co-founder of Episcopalians for Global Reconciliation.At his request and direction, there will be memorial services in both New Hampshire and at Christ Church Cathedral in Hartford. Dates and details will be announced.Walmsley is survived by his wife, Roberta, and their children, Elizabeth and John. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Joan Jennings Scalfani says: Jim Dannals says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments (4) Youth Minister Lorton, VA last_img read more

Episcopalians remember, reflect, pray for Notre Dame Cathedral

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Smoke rises around the altar in front of the cross inside Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris as a fire continues to burn, April 16, 2019. Photo: Philippe Wojazer/REUTERS[Episcopal News Service] While the world watched in stunned disbelief as Notre Dame Cathedral went up in flames April 15, many people, including Episcopalians, took to social media to post photos of their visits to the iconic church and offer prayers for the people of Paris.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry joined with the Very Rev. Lucinda Laird, dean of the American Cathedral in Paris, and Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe Bishop in Charge Mark D.W. Edington, to offer “our sincere condolences and our readiness to offer any hospitality that would be of help to the community and congregation of Notre Dame in this most holy season of the faith we share.”The three said that members of the Episcopal cathedral – located about three miles up the Seine from Notre Dame – “send our prayers in this week that ends in what we know to be the sure and certain promise of resurrection for the future life and restoration of this monument of Christian faith.”Notre Dame, the most famous of the world’s medieval Gothic cathedrals, was begun in 1163 on the Île de la Cité in the Seine and was considered finished in 1350. It rose on the site of two earlier churches. Prior to those churches, the site held a Gallo-Roman temple dedicated to Jupiter. Some of the Roman ruin can still be seen below the cathedral. About 13 million people visit the Roman Catholic cathedral each year.In New York, members of the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine must have watched news broadcasts from Paris with a special sympathy. A fire in the cathedral’s crypt broke out a day earlier, on the morning of April 14, Palm Sunday, sending smoke into the 124-foot-high stone nave and forcing the evacuation of about 100 people. The fire began after the 9 a.m. service had ended. The 11 a.m. service was moved outside, as was the Sunday soup kitchen.The Rt. Rev. Clifton Daniel, dean of the cathedral, told Episcopal News Service that the fire started in an art storage room and was contained to that space. About three-quarters of the art was saved, but the fire destroyed a valuable icon and a 16th-century chair, as well as some prints, drawings and carvings, he said. He credited the New York Fire Department’s prompt response for keeping the damage to far less than it could have been.The cathedral was open on April 15, but because of ongoing cleanup, public tours were cancelled, as were the three services scheduled for Holy Monday (Eucharist plus Morning and Evening Prayer).“My first thought, even though I wasn’t here, was oh, God, it’s just like the fire in 2001 here at the cathedral,” said Daniel, recalling his reaction to hearing about the Notre Dame disaster. (Daniel first came to the cathedral in March 2017 as interim dean.)It was a week before Christmas Eve in 2001 when the six-alarm fire burned through the timbered roof trusses, which caved in, destroying the north transept, he said. The 2001 fire also severely damaged the Great Organ and two of the cathedral’s Life of Christ Barberini tapestries. Sections of the cathedral were closed until 2008 for cleaning and restoration.“My second thought was oh, the trauma, the trauma. It will take years to recover from the trauma. You will recover, but it will take time,” Daniel said. “And then I thought, those poor people, all that suffering, all that history, all that hope. It’s going to be a tough time.”Daniel said some people asked him if the two fires this week were a sign. He told them they showed “we’re in a season of dying and rising.”Flames may have destroyed art at St. John the Divine and a large part of Notre Dame, “but, you know what, we rise again,” he said, noting that the 2001 fire left the cathedral “a little bit scarred” but still at work among the people of New York.“I feel confident that Notre Dame will be repaired, restored, renewed and will go on about its mission,” Daniel said, adding that along with the hard work that will be required in the coming years comes “an opportunity for renewal and strength to move ahead.”At Washington National Cathedral, a place that has known the impact of disaster since an August 2011 magnitude 5.8 earthquake caused tens of millions of dollars of damage, Dean Randy Hollerith expressed solidarity with another cathedral in what he called “a small sisterhood of globally recognizable Gothic cathedrals.”Evensong at the cathedral on April 15 included a prayer for Notre Dame and a copy of the prayer was placed in the church’s St. John’s Chapel for those who wanted to light a candle for the church community in Paris.“Our hearts are breaking for their loss, but we know that this great cathedral has touched and inspired millions of people around the world, and that impact can never be destroyed,” Hollerith said.The Rev. Broderick Greer, canon precentor at St. John’s Cathedral in Denver, wrote a prayer for Notre Dame, which the cathedral offered on its Facebook page “from one cathedral to another.”The Rev. Vicki Geer McGrath was among the many Episcopalians who posted their prayers and reflections on Facebook. She told parishioners at All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Millington, New Jersey, where she is the rector, that buildings do not make a church; however, “a place that is built to hold and inspire the faith and prayers of believers, and to contain the hopes and aspirations of all men and women, becomes a vessel and vehicle of holiness, no matter how simple or how grand.”McGrath wrote that she was moved by people – “their faith and hope on very public display” – who gathered in the streets of Paris, praying and singing hymns as they watched Notre Dame burn.Acknowledging the increasing secularization of Europe and the United States, she suggested that it is time for all Christians “to pray earnestly and daily for the renewal of our faith in Christ and for new life for the church” and “each one of us will be inspired and directed to be God’s agents in a new flowering of faith and life in Christ.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 16, 2019 Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopalians remember, reflect, pray for Notre Dame Cathedral Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

Evangelism is highlighted at Global Mission Conference in Dominican Republic

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Evangelism is highlighted at Global Mission Conference in Dominican Republic Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Back to Press Releases Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Participants in the Global Episcopal Mission Network’s 2019 conference pose for a group photo in Boca Chica, Dominican Republic, the site of the meeting. Photo: GEMN“We try to combine evangelism with social action,” said Bishop Moisés Quesada Mota in explaining the approach of Episcopalians in the Dominican Republic, one of the fastest-growing dioceses in The Episcopal Church. “We are a new humanity that Christ has shown in the church. We are the living gospel of Jesus Christ that has come to life in the church so we can take the message to others and show the light to people.”Quesada was speaking in a panel discussion at the 2019 Global Mission Conference that his diocese co-hosted with the Dominican Development Group, April 3-5, in Boca Chica, Dominican Republic. Organized by the Global Episcopal Mission Network (GEMN), 120 people from all over The Episcopal Church were wrestling with the role of evangelism in the church’s global mission under the theme, “Sharing Jesus: Mutual Witness in Global Mission.” The bilingual conference included simultaneous interpretation between Spanish and English.“The gospel is a different news, a radical news,” said keynoter Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio of Cuba. “It is the news of knowing that each human being has a dimension inside of themselves that they cannot fulfill without God – the presence of God and the strength of the Holy Spirit. It is news that is different from the dominant culture, where people have so much anxiety and confusion without a horizon. The gospel is the horizon, the space where we are transformed fully. It is radical and coherent. It allows us to find happiness in our lives.”It took courage for Cuban Christians to witness to their faith in the ideological environment of communism after the Cuban revolution of 1959, Delgado said as she described the steady and multi-dimensional growth of The Episcopal Church in Cuba in recent decades. “We used to say ‘Cuba for Christ.’ Now we say, ‘Christ for the Cuban people,’” she noted in highlighting the church’s effort to integrate gospel proclamation with the social and economic needs of Cubans today.“While you are doing medical mission, economic development, gender empowerment, constantly seek, name and notice Jesus’s loving presence,” said keynoter the Rev. Stephanie Spellers, canon to the presiding bishop for evangelism, reconciliation and creation care. “Put your Jesus lenses on wherever you go. Whenever you see God, name and celebrate that, invite other people to celebrate with you, and let God do the rest.”“When we go into different cultures or spaces where Christianity is not the norm, if all we have is Christian superiority, that is not going to fly,” said Spellers. As she shared her own story of seeking “a love that does not disappoint,” she declared, “This is a story I can share with Muslims, with atheists. If you haven’t figured this out, take time to identify the difference Jesus has made in your life.”“People in South Carolina often say they are ‘highly favored,’” said Bishop William Skilton, former suffragan of the Diocese of South Carolina. “Part of our problem as a church is that we have stopped at being favored, and we haven’t tried being the flavor – the salt. You’ve forgotten your calling to become fishers of people and you’ve become aquarium keepers.” The mission conference was held at the Dominican diocese’s Bishop Skilton Conference Center, named in honor of his service as a missionary and, later, assistant bishop on the Caribbean island.The Rev. Anthony Guillén, director of ethnic ministries for The Episcopal Church, noted how simple greetings can be evangelistic: “When we ask, ‘How are you?’ in the U.S. the response is usually, fine, tired, busy, okay. In Latin culture, the response is always with ‘Gracias a Dios’ added, meaning, ‘Because of God, I am fine.’ There is already a consciousness of God in our lives, proclaimed unashamedly.”In addition to plenaries by keynoters Delgado and Spellers, an array of 18 workshops addressed outreach to under-evangelized people, gospel enculturation, the history of Anglican evangelism, digital evangelism, “The Way of Love” in global mission, missional encounter with Islam, mission and community at the upcoming Lambeth Conference in 2020, locally empowered economic mission, asset-based community development, interfaith reconciliation, Hispanic evangelism, missionary vocational discernment, and site-specific discussions of mission in the Sudans, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. The Rev. David Copley, director of the global partnerships unit at The Episcopal Church Center, updated conferees on the work of that group.“In GEMN’s 24 years of annual conferences, this is the first conference to focus specifically on evangelism,” said GEMN president Titus Presler. “With the growth of the world church and the intensifying focus on poverty alleviation, the world mission community sent evangelism to the back of the line. As the church as a whole is reviving its commitment to evangelism, we in GEMN feel it’s important to re-integrate evangelism with global mission.”Conference participants responded enthusiastically to what they heard. “So many of the mission teams that come down here to the Dominican Republic are afraid to talk about their faith,” said the Rev. Emilio Martin of the diocese, “but mission is based on faith.”“If you’re only doing actions and not words, you’re leaving out half the story,” said the Rev. Veronika Travis of St. Luke’s Church in Alexandria, Virginia. “We’re hamstringing ourselves if it’s only actions and not words.”“Evangelism isn’t a dirty word for me,” Anna Sutterish of the Diocese of Ohio, a senior at Bexley Seabury Seminary, said as she highlighted generational differences in Episcopal attitudes toward evangelism. “I’m 29 years old and I have no problem with evangelism.”Responding to the common question, “Isn’t evangelism disrespectful to non-Christians?” Spellers said, “It’s disrespectful to shove religion at people, to proselytize and denounce other pathways to God. But if you speak with generosity, curiosity and gratitude, then people respond more positively.”The conference concluded with visits to congregational and medical mission sites on the island. Patrons of conference receptions were Bexley Seabury Seminary, the Diocese of Connecticut and the Dominican Development Group.GEMN’s Mission Formation Program preceded the conference, this year enrolling a record 14 participants to spend a day exploring biblical foundations, mission theology, cultural dynamics and the practicalities of catalyzing mission vision and mutuality with companions around the world. The four participants graduating from the two-year program shared their projects: field research on indigenous religious rites in the Philippines; work on GEMN’s curriculum based on “The Way of Love”; exploring ways of enabling Honduran women to economically manage their monthly cycles without missing school or work; and a memoir about working in GEMN since its inception in 1994.The Global Episcopal Mission Network links dioceses, congregations, mission organizations, seminaries and individuals throughout the Episcopal Church to “proclaim, inspire and ignite the joy of God’s mission.” Global Episcopal Mission NetworkPosted Apr 12, 2019 Evangelism Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

Epiphany 2021: Presiding Bishop issues a call to prayer for…

first_imgEpiphany 2021: A Call to Prayer for our Nation from Presiding Bishop Curry Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Curate Diocese of Nebraska Back to Press Releases Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Church Office of Public AffairsPosted Jan 6, 2021 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL [January 6, 2021] On this day of the Feast of the Epiphany, Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry invites Episcopalians and people of faith to turn and pray on behalf of our nation.Watch the video of the Presiding Bishop’s statement here.A transcript of the statement follows:Today is January the 6th, 2021. It is the Feast of the Epiphany. And on this particular day at this particular moment, even as our nation’s capital is being endangered and assaulted, we pray that the Lord Jesus Christ, we pray that God, in his Way of Love, might prevail in all of our hearts.The events at our Capitol today are deeply disturbing. We believe the actions of armed protesters represent a coup attempt. We are a democracy, with long-standing institutional norms that must be honored, foremost among them, following the processes laid out in the Constitution and Federal statute to facilitate the peaceful and orderly transition of power.Today’s protesters pushed through police barricades and forced their way into Congressional chambers, and the Capitol building are now threatened, and threatening the safety of lawmakers, their staff, and others who work in the Capitol complex.  This threatens the integrity of our democracy. The national security of our nation, the continuity of government, and the lives and safety of our legislators, their staffs, law enforcement, and all who work in the Capitol.I, therefore, ask you now to join me in prayer for our nation, praying first from the prayers that accompany Morning Prayer:Save your people, Lord, and bless your inheritance;Govern and uphold us now and always.Day by day we bless you;We praise your name forever.Lord, keep us from sin today;Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy. Lord, show us your love and mercy;For we put our trust in you. In you, Lord, is our hope;And we shall never hope in vain.-Morning Prayer II, Book of Common Prayer, p. 98Let us pray:Eternal God, in whose perfect kingdom no sword is drawn but the sword of righteousness, no strength known but the strength of love: So mightily spread abroad your Spirit, that all peoples may be gathered together under the banner of the Prince of Peace, as children of one God and Creator of us all; to whom be dominion and glory, now and forever.For Peace, Book of Common Prayer, p. 815Oh God, you made us in your own image and redeemed us through Jesus your son. Look now with compassion on the entire human family; and particularly this part of the family, in the United States, and those in our nation’s capital; take away the arrogance and hatred which infect our hearts; break down the walls that separate us; unite us in bonds of love; and work through our struggle and confusion to accomplish your purposes on earth; that, in your good time, all nations and races may serve you in harmony around your heavenly throne; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.For the Human Family, Book of Common Prayer, p. 815On this day and at this moment, we pray for our nation. We ask God to heal us, to show us the way to healing, to show us the way to be one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.Now, as our Savior Christ has taught us, we are bold to say,Our Father who art in heaven,hallowed be thy Name,thy kingdom come,thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.Give us this day our daily breadAnd forgive us our trespasses,as we forgive those who trespass against us.And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil,For thine is the kingdom,and the power and the glory,forever and ever.Amen.And now, may the peace of God which passeth all understanding keep your hearts and minds in the knowledge and love of God and of his Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.The blessing of God Almighty the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit be on you and on this nation and on the entire human family and all of creation this moment and forevermore.Amen.[7 de enero de 2021] En este día de la Fiesta de la Epifanía, el obispo primado de la Iglesia Episcopal, Michael Curry, invita a los episcopales y a personas de todas las religiones a volverse [a Dios] y orar por nuestra nación.Pueden ver el video con la declaración del Obispo Primado aquí.A continuación se encuentra una transcripción de su mensaje:Hoy es 6 de enero de 2021. Es la Fiesta de la Epifanía. Y en este día en particular, en este momento en particular, incluso mientras la capital de nuestra nación está en peligro y es atacada, oramos para que el Señor Jesucristo, oramos para que Dios, en su Camino de Amor, prevalezca en todos nuestros corazones.Los sucesos ocurridos hoy en nuestro Capitolio son profundamente inquietantes. Creemos que las acciones de los manifestantes armados representan un intento de golpe de Estado. Somos una democracia, con normas institucionales de larga data que deben ser respetadas, siendo la principal de ellas seguir los procesos establecidos en la Constitución y el estatuto federal para facilitar la transición pacífica y ordenada del poder.Los manifestantes de hoy se abrieron paso a través de las barricadas policiales y entraron a la fuerza en las cámaras del Congreso, y el edificio del Capitolio ahora está amenazado así como la seguridad de los legisladores, su personal y otras personas que trabajan en el complejo del Capitolio. Esto atenta contra la integridad de nuestra democracia, la seguridad nacional, la continuidad del gobierno y la vida y seguridad de nuestros legisladores, su personal, las fuerzas del orden y todos los que trabajan en el Capitolio.Por tanto, les pido ahora que se unan a mí para orar por nuestra nación, rezando primero una de las plegarias que aparecen en la Oración Matutina:Señor, salva a tu pueblo y bendice a tu heredad;Gobiérnalos y susténtalos para siempre. De día en día te bendecimos; Alabamos tu nombre perpetuamente. Guárdanos, Señor, sin pecado en este día;Ten piedad de nosotros, Señor, ten piedad. Señor, muéstranos tu amor y misericordia;Porque sólo en ti confiamos. En ti, Señor, está nuestra esperanza;Que nuestra esperanza nunca sea en vano.     – Oración Matutina, Libro de Oración Común, p. 61Oremos:Eterno Dios, en cuyo reino perfecto no se esgrime más espada que la de la justiciar, ni se conoce otra fuerza que la del amor: Derrama poderosamente tu Espíritu sobre todos los pueblos, a fin de que sean reunidos bajo el estandarte del Príncipe de Paz, como hijos de un solo Padre; a quien sea el dominio y la gloria, por los siglos de los siglos.     – Por la Paz, Libro de Oración Común, p. 705Oh Dios, tú nos hiciste a tu propia imagen, y nos redimiste por Jesús tu Hijo: mira en tu compasión a toda la familia humana; y en particular esta parte de la familia, en Estados Unidos, y los que se encuentran en la capital de nuestra nación; quita el odio y la arrogancia que nos corrompen el corazón; derrumba las barreras que nos separan; únenos en vínculos de amor y actúa a través de nuestra lucha y confusión a fin de cumplir tus propósitos en la tierra; para que, a su debido tiempo, todas las naciones y razas te sirvan en armonía alrededor de tu trono celestial; por Jesucristo nuestro Señor. Amén.     – Por la familia humana, Libro de Oración Común, p. 705En este día y en este momento, oramos por nuestra nación. Le pedimos a Dios que nos restaure, para mostrarnos el camino de la restauración, para mostrarnos la manera de llegar a ser una nación sujeta a [la voluntad de] Dios, indivisible, con libertad y justicia para todos.Ahora, como nuestro Salvador Cristo nos ha enseñado, nos atrevemos a decir:Padre nuestro que estás en el cielo,santificado sea tu Nombre,venga tu reino,Hágase tu voluntad, en la tierra como en el cielo.Danos hoy nuestro pan de cada díaPerdona nuestras ofensas,Como también nosotros perdonamos a los que nos ofenden.Y no nos dejes caer en tentación, mas líbranos del mal.Porque tuyo es el reino,y el poder y la gloria,ahora y por siempre.Amén.Y ahora, que la paz de Dios que excede a todo entendimiento guarde sus corazones y mentes en el conocimiento y amor de Dios y de su Hijo Jesucristo, nuestro Señor.La bendición de Dios todopoderoso, el Padre, el Hijo y el Espíritu Santo, sea con ustedes y con esta nación y con toda la familia humana y con toda la creación, ahora y por siempre.Amén. Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more

Apopka City Council Meeting Preview

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your name here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom If social media comments are any indication we can expect the discussion about Resolution 2016-16 to perhaps be the most interesting topic on the Agenda for Wednesday night’s City Council Meeting.  The draft resolution, if adopted, will establish;  “A Public Participation Policy & Procedures for Addressing the City Council.”  More about this item can be found here.Here are some other interesting items on tomorrow’s Apopka City Council Meeting agenda:PresentationsBy now everyone should be aware of Christian Lamphere’s 9/11 Memorial Eagle Scout Project.  An artist’s conception of the Memorial will be discussed. And a check will be presented by Copart to Christian Lamphere for the 9/11 Memorial Project. These two items will be followed by an announcement about the UCF Colleges of Medicine Free Clinic.May Disbursement ReportThe first of seven items on the “Consent Agenda” is approval of a 37-page report that lists 497 checks that were issued by the City in May 2016.  These payments total $3,022,382.The “Consent Agenda” is a meeting practice which packages routine and non-controversial items not requiring discussion and/or separate approval as one agenda item.  However, any member of the Council can request that any item on the Consent Agenda be “pulled,” and discussed separately.Vehicle for Hire permit – UberThe 2nd item on the Consent Agenda is the issuance of a Vehicle for Hire permit to an Uber driver.Three Service Weapon RetirementsAnother Consent Agenda item.  The Police Department is requesting authorization to present service weapons to retiring members of the Police Department to recognize the members’ credited service to the City of Apopka and its citizens.Canine Handler Officer Paul Rehn served Apopka for 19 yearsSchool Resource Officer Jamie Anderson served Apopka for 19 yearsSergeant Robert Mark served Apopka for 12 yearsApprove the Sale of Alcoholic Beverages on the 4th of July at the Northwest Recreation ComplexAnother Consent Agenda Item.   Fireworks at the Amphitheater is a City sponsored event held at the Northwest Recreation Complex. Apopka Ordinance No. 2376 requires City Council approvalfor the sale, consumption and carrying of alcoholic beverages on City-owned property during events or programs.Purchase of a Vacuum Excavator Trailer – $39,613Item #6 on the Consent Agenda will authorize the purchase of a Vacuum Excavator Trailer for the Public Services Department. Staff proposes to spend $39,613.00.  This price is based upon using a 2015 Florida Sheriffs Association Contract. “Piggybacking” on the the Florida Sheriffs Association contract will expedite this purchase and allow the Public Services Department to implement the NPDES Stormwater requirements in a timely manner.Award Website Design Contract – $34,186 plus $6,031 per yearEight companies submitted proposals. An evaluation committee of five city staff reviewed and ranked each proposal. The evaluation committee recommends CivicPlus.   The first year cost is $34,186. Annual website hosting, security and management is $6,031 beginning in year 2.Non-Profits to be Required to Apply for Business Tax ReceiptsApopka Code requires tax-exempt organizations to apply for but not pay business taxes.  The Green Sheet indicates that many non-profts have not applied.  The Business Tax Receipt Applications are used by the City to ensure that buildings used by non-profits are in compliance with building, zoning and fire codes.  It is estimated that 150 non-profits will be asked to apply.Use this link to see the details on these issues and to review the entire meeting package.The meeting is at 7:00 PM in the Council Chamber at Apopka City Hall. Please enter your comment! TAGSApopka City Council Meeting Previous articleCity Council Considers Restrictions on Public CommentsNext articleIs it Possible to Buy a Good Grill for $300 or Less? Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Smith draws on a diverse background in service to Apopka

first_img March 14, 2018 at 11:40 pm Decision Apopka 2018Editor’s Note: This is the second in a series of features on the 10 candidates running for office in the Apopka municipal elections.Apopka City Commission Candidate Feature: Seat #1 Alexander SmithAlexander Smith is a product of Apopka. In many ways, he embodies its history, its struggle, and its growth like no other. Smith was born in poverty and raised in South Apopka. “We had an outhouse in the backyard,” said Smith, describing his childhood home. “If we wanted to feed the chickens, we just dropped the feed through the floorboards. We didn’t even have to go outside.”Alexander SmithAt an early age, Smith began his career in the farming industry picking oranges, firing orange groves at night, working in the citrus packing house, on the muck farm in Zellwood pulling corn, picking cucumbers and cutting cabbage. His days began at 5 AM on the job, followed by a long walk to school. After school ended for the day, he walked back to his job and worked until evening.It was this back-breaking work as a youth that Smith believes built his character, and spring-boarded him into the next chapter of his life. “I grew up in South Apopka,” he said. “I know their plight. Because of my diverse background which has always involved working with people from my early childhood until the present I have learned to appreciate all professions.”Smith is running for the Apopka City Commission Seat #1 currently held by six-term incumbent Commissioner Billie Dean. The two men have quite a history together.In 1970, Smith, a ninth grader, went to his first Apopka City Council meeting. Dean, Smith’s teacher at the time, took him to see Alonzo Williams Jr., the first black Commissioner in Apopka history. It was his first year on the City Council. Williams held that seat for 24 years until Dean succeeded him as the second black commissioner in Apopka history in 1994.Smith was in awe of Williams and decided he would follow in his footsteps one day.“That visit made a lasting impression and one of my lifelong goals has been to become one of Apopka’s City Commissioners,” he said.Smith, 61, graduated from Apopka High School, and then went to Florida A&M University, graduating with a degree in Agricultural Education and a minor in Horticultural Science. He returned to Apopka after college and worked in the Orange County Public School system for 39 years before his retirement.But even after a career in education that spanned four decades, Smith still has a passion for improving the lives of children.“I want to bring more opportunities to the youth in Apopka,” Smith said. “Recreational activities, internship programs, and mentor programs. We need more parks evenly distributed throughout the city, not in just one place. Youth is my passion. Young people are our future. But if we don’t prepare them for the future, we won’t have a future.”If elected as a city commissioner, Smith would also like to revisit three other amenities for the youth of this community that seem to have been forgotten.“Years ago, several businesses committed to bringing a YMCA, Boy’s Club, and a swimming pool to Apopka,” he said. “They were going to contribute to the costs of bringing those here, and I’m not sure why it failed or what happened, but I would go back to those businesses and ask them to invest in our city. We can always also seek grants from the federal and state level to supplement what we cannot raise on our own.”Of all the issues facing Apopka, Smith believes managing its impending population boom, and economic development is the most important to Apopka’s future. “Growth is something we can’t stop. It’s coming. And that’s a good thing. But I just think it needs to be managed. And if managed properly, growth can be good. We don’t want to destroy the environment and atmosphere that attracted people to make Apopka their home. We need to balance what we’re doing when it comes to growth.”He has also listened closely to the budget debates and believes the general fund reserves need to be dramatically increased in the coming years. “The reserve should be enough to cover at least six months of actual expenses in case there’s a disaster or if something drastic happens… or in case an unexpected opportunity becomes available that we can profit from and there are funds in the reserve not allocated. We as a city could benefit from that opportunity.” Although Smith did not specify any specific budget cuts or tax increases to build the reserves to the level he desires, he does believe that if the City staff were given a directive, they could accomplish it within five years.“It could be incrementally put into place over time,” he said. “But it’s something the City Council should instruct the staff to do.”He also wants to see the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) balance its plan from a heavy economic development strategy to a more proportionate approach that includes a mix of residential projects. “I think there needs to be a balance as to how the CRA dollars are spent. I can understand the economic development part, but I think some of those funds should be spent in residential areas as well because it says slum and blight… so I think they are addressing the blighted part, but not the slum.” Annexation of South Apopka was referenced in the mayoral debate, and it’s a topic Smith knows well. Although he is a resident of Rock Springs Ridge, he hasn’t forgotten his roots, and he remembers a time when Apopka tried to annex South Apopka but failed. Smith, however, believes that if annexation came up again, things could be different. And he, for one, would like to try. “I’m in favor of annexing South Apopka. It’s the humane thing to do. I was there 40 years ago when it was placed on the ballot, but no one visited that community and presented them with the advantages of being a part of the city. I think if they did, they would have seen the advantages far outweighed the disadvantages. The city didn’t do a very good job of educating South Apopka about the benefits of being in the city. Orange County did an outstanding job of why they should stay in the county, therefore it failed.” Despite the setback, Smith believes the climate for annexation may be advantageous. “Since that time, a lot of people have been educated as to the benefits of being a part of the city. The government that’s closer to you is better able to serve you. South Apopka is closer to the city of Apopka. So, therefore, it’s better able to serve those residents. We realize there’s going to be economic challenges providing those services to South Apopka. The county collects taxes from them, but they don’t provide a lot of services. It’s like free money. I feel annexing South Apopka into the city would be a benefit to both the residence and Apopka. We already provide water. I don’t think the cost is going to be so drastic like some are saying. I know the property values are a little lower there, but when you look at the map of Apopka, they have gone all around South Apopka and so I think it’s  unfair to cast them adrift. It seems like they’re saying ‘you’re not worth being a part of our city… your second-class citizens. We’ve gone around you and sucked everything else up and left you on this little island.’ Despite his clear passion for South Apopka, Smith insists that if elected he will be a commissioner for all of Apopka.“It’s not about me,” he said. “Everyone has their agenda. I hear people in the audience at City Council meetings whispering to each other ‘what about what the people think?’ I want to be the people’s voice on City Council. My goal is to represent all of Apopka.”And Smith, the product of Apopka that was refined in the muck farms of Zellwood, seasoned in the classrooms of Orange County, and rooted in the community that he loves is still living by the golden rule he learned as a child.“It is my belief that all men and women are created equal and regardless of our backgrounds or our walk in life that it takes those blended experiences to improve the quality of life for every individual. I have not forgotten where I came from and what it took to get to the crossroads of my life.” Please enter your name here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your comment! UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSAlexander SmithApopka City Commission Seat #1 Previous articleLeroy Bell rings an audacious tone in his quest for City Council seatNext articleKilsheimer and Nelson: In their own words Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Reply You have my vote, sir. Blessings Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. 1 COMMENT Apopka 4 Lifelast_img read more

Nolan or Velazquez? Apopka will know the answer tonight!

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Mama Mia Mama Mia Mama Mia 5 COMMENTS TAGSDecision Apopka 2018 Previous articleNolan continues to surprise Apopka with Seat #2 runNext articleNews from the precincts: Rain is hampering turnout Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Reply Please enter your comment! Reply UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Mama Mia Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Please enter your name here Barbara McLeod: Funny that the city clerk’s office says that Alice Nolan is qualified to run for Seat #2 City Commissioner…..LOL Seriously, Barbara, do you question the City of Apopka’s City Clerk office’s authority over the city elections????? LOL April 10, 2018 at 4:43 pm LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply April 10, 2018 at 4:32 pmcenter_img I meant to post: Or do you have any shame what so ever?…. didn’t mean to post “are” instead of “or”…..sorry, I am still shook up over the crime scene near my house! Barbara McLeod, that statement you posted about Alice…..you should be ashamed. Are do you have any shame what so ever? Ugh…….. April 10, 2018 at 4:09 pm It is not a crime scene after all, it is a man that was found deceased at home, and not foul play involved…. April 10, 2018 at 3:55 pm Decision Apopka 2018Welcome to Election Day 2.0: The runoff editionGood morning Apopka. It’s finally here. The runoff election for Seat #2 on the City Commission between challenger Alice Nolan and incumbent Commissioner Diane Velazquez which will conclude the Apopka election cycle for 2018 and decide the fifth and final seat on the City Council.As of 5 PM on Monday, 1,856 voters have cast their ballots either at the early voting site or by mail-in ballot. Nolan and Velazquez were neck-and-neck in the March 13th general election. But how will they fare today?After 7 PM tonight, they will know their fates.Stay with The Apopka Voice all day for wall-to-wall coverage of the elections. There will be published features, interviews of candidates, on-site updates from the polling places, and election results as soon as they are known after the polls close at 7:00 PM.And check back on Wednesday for analysis of the final race of Decision Apopka 2018.It’s going to be a beautiful day Apopka. Temperatures are supposed to be between 59 and 76 with only a few thunderstorms in the forecast. So grab a cup of coffee, maybe get some breakfast at a local restaurant and vote for the candidate you think will lead Apopka into its bright future. Reply April 11, 2018 at 11:19 am Mama Mia Now, if attention was only turned away from the City of Apopka election, and to the national scene, as in: GOOD RIDDANCE TO TRUMP! Stormy weather ahead for Trump…..lol Stormy Daniels is getting more attractive everyday to me….lol, especially since she won’t go away with her little $130,000 pay off from Trump’s attorney! Trump’s on the warpath….beware, he will fire anybody and everybody….the theme song for this week is: ANOTHER ONE BITES THE DUST! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Reply Reply Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 last_img read more

Google to Launch Live TV Streaming Service with YouTube TV

first_imgA cloud DVR with no storage limits Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSGoogleTelevisionYoutube Previous articleDoes splitting bill in two edge Enterprise Florida closer to chopping block?Next articleCostco Raises Membership Fees Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR A cloud DVR, with no storage limits. With YouTube TV, you’ll be able to record live TV and never run out of storage. Your cloud DVR can record as many shows as you want, simultaneously, without using precious data or space on your phone and it will store each of your recordings for nine months.A service that works on all your screens. You can watch YouTube TV on any screen—mobile, tablet or computer—and you can easily stream to your TV with a Google Chromecast or Chromecast built-in TV. YouTube TV works on both Android and iOS. And your cloud DVR goes with you, so you can stream your recordings on any device, whenever and wherever you want.YouTube Red Originals. With a YouTube TV membership, you can watch all YouTube Red Original series and movies right on the new YouTube TV app.Six accounts, one price. Every YouTube TV membership comes with six accounts, each with its own unique recommendations and personal DVR with no storage limits. You can watch up to three concurrent streams at a time.Half the cost of cable with zero commitments. A YouTube TV membership is only $35 a month and there are no commitments—you can cancel anytime.YouTube TV will be available soon in the largest U.S. markets and will quickly expand to cover more cities across the country. Visit tv.youtube.com and sign up to find out when we’ll launch in your market. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter The Anatomy of Fear Please enter your name here Google is jumping into the live TV streaming game with YouTube TV this Spring. YouTube TV is designed for the YouTube generation and those people who want to watch what they want anytime and anywhere. With three live streaming services already up and running including Sling TV, Playstation Vue, and DirectTV Now, it will be interesting to see how they fare. Currently, the price is slated for a $35 per month.Here’s what YouTube TV offers:Live TV streaming from ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, ESPN, regional sports networks and dozens of popular cable networks. YouTube TV gives you the best of live TV, from must-see broadcast shows like “Empire,” “The Voice,” “The Big Bang Theory” and “Scandal,” to the live sports you want. YouTube TV includes major sports networks like ESPN and regional sports networks like Fox Sports Networks and Comcast SportsNet, so you can watch your favorite NBA or MLB teams. You can also addShowtime,or Fox Soccer Plus to your networks for an additional charge. In total, YouTube TV gives you access to more than 40 networks, listed below. Please enter your comment!last_img read more

AAA offers Tow-to-Go on Labor Day weekend

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Tow-to-Go program available Friday through Labor Day With the end of summer in sight, many Americans will be celebrating Labor Day weekend in one way or another. Whether that involves attending a family barbeque, hosting a party, or visiting the local sports bar, AAA and Budweiser urge everyone to plan ahead to celebrate safely. That means choosing a Designated Driver, staying where they are celebrating, or arranging for another form of safe transportation.For those that did not plan ahead and need the Tow To Go program, it is available Friday, September 1st through 6 A.M. Tuesday morning, September 5th. Tow To Go Guidelines:Confidential local ride to a safe location within 10 milesThe AAA tow truck takes the vehicle and the driver homeFree and available to AAA members and non-membersTow to Go is provided in Florida, Georgia, Tennessee,  Nebraska, Iowa, North Dakota, Indiana (Fort Wayne and South Bend only) and Wisconsin (Wausau only)Tow To Go may not be available in rural areas or during severe weather conditionsVisit www.AAA.com/TowtoGo for dates and availability throughout 2017If you are hosting a party, please do so responsibly. Check out the Great Pretenders Party Guide from the Auto Club Group Traffic Safety Foundation to learn more.“Labor Day weekend is a great opportunity to get together with friends and family,” said Amy Stracke, Executive Director for AAA’s Auto Club Group Traffic Safety Foundation. “Please plan ahead to make sure all of your loved ones get home safely – especially when alcohol is involved.”“The Tow To Go program is an effective way to promote the use of Designated Drivers and help prevent impaired driving,” said Katja Zastrow, Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility for Anheuser-Busch. “We are proud to partner with AAA and their roadside assistance drivers to help keep our roads safe.”Since its inception in 1998, Tow To Go has safely removed more than 24,000 impaired drivers from roads across the Southeast and Midwest. It is designed to be a safety net for motorists who did not plan ahead when drinking away from home on celebratory holidays. It is offered based on the availability of AAA drivers and tow trucks during times of high call volume. The Auto Club Group Traffic Safety Foundation provides Tow To Go to help keep all motorists safe from the dangers of impaired driving.Anheuser-Busch Wholesalers have been cosponsors of the program since its inception in 1998. Not only has the company provided funding for the service, it has also worked with local bars and restaurants to help educate servers on the importance of not over-serving their customers. Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 TAGSAAATow-to-go Previous articleAPD Arrest ReportNext article5 tips on how to effectively charge your phone Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name here You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Please enter your comment! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply The Anatomy of Fear Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Loneliness is bad for your health

first_img Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 What a timely article. Never in this earth’s history has loneliness reached such epidemic proportions. People of all levels of the social strata are quite literally dying for want of a kind word. We were created by God to be social creatures. The scriptures tell us, “It is not good for man, (or woman) to be alone.” Those residents of nursing homes are seemingly abandoned by the very ones that condemn them to a life of isolation and loneliness. As much as I hate to say it, the native peoples that abandoned the elderly to die in the wilderness were likely more merciful that we are at present because those thus abandoned died relatively quickly, unlike those that we abandon to uncaring and unloving long care facilities to ultimately die after a long, lonely, and lingering existence just awaiting that death to overtake them. What an uncaring society we have turned into, all in the name of convenience! Chaz Please enter your comment! March 1, 2018 at 1:52 pm Please enter your name here 1 COMMENT charles towne The Anatomy of Fear center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter The VOICE of HealthBy Jed Magen, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Michigan State University and first published on theconversation.comImagine a 65-year-old woman who sees her physician frequently for a variety of aches and pains. She might complain of back pain on one visit, headaches another time, and feeling weak on the next. Each time, her physician does a physical exam and runs the appropriate tests, without finding anything to account for her symptoms. Each time, she leaves the office feeling frustrated that “nothing can be done” for what ails her.However, if we looked more closely, we’d find out that this patient lost her husband five years earlier and has been living alone since. Her three children all live in other states. Although she dotes on her grandchildren, she sees them only about once a year. She has a few friends that she only sees occasionally. If asked, she would probably tell you that, yes, she is lonely.This is a common picture in a family physician’s office. These ill-defined symptoms without any clear cause might well be the result of social isolation and boredom. Research shows that people who feel lonely have more health problems, feel worse and perhaps die at an earlier age.Psychiatry, my specialty, has long known that feelings of all kinds can affect our physical health in profound ways. It seems officials are starting to take that seriously – the United Kingdom now even has a minister for loneliness. And for good reason.Negative effectsIn 2015, researchers from Brigham Young University looked at multiple studies on loneliness and isolation. Their results from several hundred thousand people showed that social isolation resulted in a 50 percent increase in premature death.Loneliness and social isolation are also associated with increased blood pressure, higher cholesterol levels, depression and, if that weren’t bad enough, decreases in cognitive abilities and Alzheimer’s disease.Humans evolved to be around others. Long ago, we hunted in small hunter-gather groups, where social cohesion could help protect from predators. Being alone without support in the wild is dangerous – and stressful. You’d have to be constantly vigilant for dangers, ready to go into “fight or flight” mode at any time.Over the short term, stress can be healthy. But in the long term, uncontrolled stress becomes a problem. There’s good evidence that chronic stress elevates levels of a hormone called cortisol in the brain. Cortisol can decrease immune system responses to infections. It might even make neurons in the brain less active and even lead to cell death. It contributes to inflammation, which is connected to cardiovascular disease, stroke, and hypertension and is probably a cause of depression.Just like the person long ago in the wild, someone who’s lonely over the long term can experience these cortisol responses. Lonely people are stressed much of the time.Loneliness is more common in older adults.surowa/shutterstock.comAnother hormone named oxytocin seems to play a role in social isolation. In popular media, oxytocin is often referred to as the “love hormone.” This is an overstatement, but oxytocin is involved in relationships and pair bonding. For example, after birth, high oxytocin levels are associated with better mother-infant bonding.Oxytocin also seems to be linked to reduced stress. For instance, it’s associated with decreases in levels of norepinephrine, the “fight or flight” hormone, as well as decreases in blood pressure and heart rate, much the opposite of chronic cortisol. Oxytocin also seems to decrease activity in the amygdala, a part of the brain that activates whenever there’s a perceived threat.A little less lonelySo what can we do about all this? There are no real medications to treat loneliness unless one is also depressed or has high levels of anxiety.Issues with loneliness seem to be more prevalent in older adults. The AARP found that about 17 percent of older Americans are lonely and or isolated.CNN reporter and physician Sanjay Gupta suggests that society should start to view loneliness as another chronic disease. If so, then patients need long-term strategies to manage this problem.Not surprisingly, the currently recommended treatment revolves around establishing social relationships. For older adults, joining the local senior center is a wonderful way to get involved in activities and meet people. What about volunteering? Senior volunteer programs are always looking for older adults who will deliver meals, do mailings and a variety of other activities. It is surprising how small things can also be helpful.A simple phone call once a day from an adult child is an opportunity to share things from the day or about grandchildren. Even better, video conferencing via computer is easy and cheap. You can actually talk to and see your children and grandchildren who might be on the other side of the country. Studies in long-term care facilities found that pets can also reduce loneliness.Because people have to be followed for years in order to determine if these or other interventions actually counteract the effects of loneliness, little work of this kind has been done as of yet. It seems reasonable, though, to think that psychosocial interventions are powerful since healthy adults have these kinds of coping skills.From a medical perspective, the wise physician will schedule people who seem to primarily be lonely for periodic visits just to talk. In my opinion, this could prevent more unnecessary testing and costly care.Finally, even if you have a rich set of social contacts, maybe your neighbor who walks by alone on occasion doesn’t. Say hello. Reply TAGSthe conversation.comThe VOICE of Health Previous articleThe Apopka Voice Townhall Seat #1 tonight; Seat #2 Thursday nightNext articleThe Apopka Voice Townhall Seat #2 tonight Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more