This Site Takes You On A Musical Roadtrip With Songs From Almost Any Country & Decade Since 1900

first_imgWhen we listen to music, generally music is sorted alphabetically by artist and song title. However, in 2012, Benjamin Moreau had a different idea; he wondered what it would look like if songs were sorted by chronology and geography. Thus, Radiooooo was born, a website that lets its users choose a country and decade and automatically populates playlists of hits from that era and place.Spotify’s New “Time Capsule” Playlist Function Guesses What You Listened To In High SchoolAppropriately, each of the five “o”‘s in Radiooooo’s name represent a different continent (though to avoid confusion, the website bought domain names from Radiooo.com to radioooooooooooooooooooo.com). The site lets visitors choose a country on a world map as well as a decade since the 1900s. Once chosen, the website automatically feeds users songs from that time and place via a playlist of crowdsourced songs. Thus, you can listen to what was poppin’ in Mongolia in 80s, Peru in the 1910s, or Tanzania in the 2000s. The site also has the option to customize these playlists by “mood,” offering playlists that feature slow, fast, and “weird” tracks, as well as a “musical road trip” feature that combines different countries and decades.Forgotify Lets You Listen To Millions Of Unheard Songs That Have Never Been Streamed On SpotifyRadiooooo gets its song selections via submissions of over thirty-thousand contributors globally. These submissions are then reviewed by the site’s curators, who ensure that songs are high-quality and fit with the vibe of the site before adding songs to playlists—only 10% of the thousands of submissions they receive make it onto the website. You can explore the website and the music of the world at Radiooooo.com.[Sources: New Yorker]last_img read more

Les Miz Flag-Waver Kyle Scatliffe on Why He’d Make a Terrible Ninja

first_img Age: 27Hometown: Westwood, NJCurrent Role: Waving the flag as Enjolras, student revolutionary, in the Broadway revival of Les Miserables.Stage Cred: Coalhouse Walker in Ragtime in Austin, Jud Fry in Oklahoma! in Seattle and Haywood Patterson in the London premiere of The Scottsboro Boys, a role that just earned him an Olivier Award nomination.“I grew up around Italians, so I talk with my hands all the time. If I’m talking and I start getting passionate about what I’m saying, my hands just start flying around. Big hand talker.”“People in high school would tell me they can hear me coming down the hallway. I have a big laugh. They’d be like, ‘Is Kyle here?’ and you’d hear ‘HAHAHA’ and they’d be like, ‘Kyle’s here.’ It’s like a warning signal. I’d be a terrible ninja.”“I’m 6’5″. When I was a kid, I was 5’7” and I played basketball. But I stopped ’cause it’s not the best height for basketball. Then, out of nowhere, I grew over the summer to six feet and then 6’1” by 11th grade. Everyone was like, ‘Hey, you should come back and play basketball!’ And I was like, ‘I think I like theater more so I’ll see you guys later!”“I was leaving on a Disney cruise when I got cast in The Scottsboro Boys. I would play villains in their Villains Tonight! show. I’d do Hades from Hercules, Jafar from Aladdin… But the best to play was Scar, because The Lion King is my favorite.”“A black kid in Hawaii messaged me after I got the part of Enjolras. He played the role there and was really happy to see that someone could play the part on this scale. It was surreal for me and I thought, ‘This is what Barack Obama must have felt like,’ because when he was voted President, all black people said, ‘Wow, a black person can be President!’”“I stopped moving when I first saw the Enjolras vest and just went ‘Ooh!’ I ran into the boys dressing room and was like, ‘The vest! The vest!’ I was very excited to put it on!” Related Shows Kyle Scatliffe Kyle Scatliffe photographed at the Paramount Hotel for Broadway.com by Caitlin McNaney Star Filescenter_img View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 4, 2016 Les Miserableslast_img read more