Al Dustour editor sentenced to six months in prison

first_img Reporters Without Borders condemns the six-month prison sentence that a criminal court in the Cairo district of Bulak Abu Al-Ala imposed on 26 March on Ibrahim Issa, the editor of the weekly Al Dustour. Although courts previously dismissed eight other similar complaints against him, Issa was finally convicted under articles 171 and 188 of the criminal code of publishing false information “liable to harm the general interest and the country’s stability.” He was also fined 200 pounds (30 euros).“The authorities are continuing the campaign of intimidation against independent journalists that began at the start of 2007,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Comments about the necessary limits on press freedom made by the judge the day after passing sentence are indicative of the judiciary’s general attitude towards the media.”The case dates back to 5 September 2007, when a member of the ruling National Democratic Party brought a complaint about articles referring to rumours about President Hosni Mubarak’s health. Issa’s lawyer told Reporters Without Borders he thought the conviction was unjustified as eight other complaints brought by pro-government lawyers against Issa in 2007 for the same reasons were dismissed on the grounds that there was “no direct, family link between the plaintiffs and the president.” He added that he intended to appeal.A case involving Issa and the editors of three other weeklies – Adel Hammouda of Al-Fagr, Wael Al-Abrashi of Sawt Al-Umma and Abdel-Halim Qandil of Karama – is meanwhile due to be heard by an appeal court on 5 April. A criminal court in the Cairo district of Al-Aguza sentenced them on 13 September 2007 to a year of forced labour and fines of 20,000 pounds (2,600 euros) for publishing false information “liable to harm the general interest and the country’s stability.” March 28, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Al Dustour editor sentenced to six months in prison RSF_en Organisation EgyptMiddle East – North Africa News Detained woman journalist pressured by interrogator, harassed by prison staff EgyptMiddle East – North Africa News January 22, 2021 Find out more February 1, 2021 Find out morecenter_img News to go further News Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Egypt Less press freedom than ever in Egypt, 10 years after revolution Receive email alerts February 6, 2021 Find out more Al Jazeera journalist Mahmoud Hussein back home after four years in prisonlast_img read more

Trojans able to hold off Huskies this time around

first_imgLike it was four weeks ago, the Trojans held a double-digit lead in the second half over Washington. And again, the Huskies made a push to trim the Trojans’ advantage.But unlike January 3rd in Seattle, the Men of Troy were able to weather the Huskies’ push and come away with a 98-88 victory at Galen Center Saturday afternoon.Junior forward Nikola Jovanovic led the way with 28 points on 10-of-13 shooting while sophomore guard Jordan McLaughlin chipped in 21 points, making 5-of-10 shots.The Huskies made a run to cut into the Trojans’ lead to start the second half, cutting the 11-point lead down to three after a couple of transition baskets.But USC answered with a run of its own, scoring on eight of its next nine possessions. Jovanovic continued to score inside and a 3-pointer by McLaughlin helped regain a double-digit advantage for the Trojans at 72-61 midway through the second half.“We just remained poised,” McLaughlin said. “We understood what we went through when we were up there [at Washington]. Yesterday in practice we worked on our press break, coming back to the ball and helping out whoever was getting pressed. We really emphasized all the mistakes we had up there.”After Washington trimmed the lead down to two possessions with under four minutes to play, USC clamped down on defense, holding the Huskies to just two field goals the rest of the way. Jovanovic’s putback layup gave USC a 93-82 lead with just over a minute to play.The junior’s 28 points was a season-high and he did most of his damage in the paint against a Washington team that struggles with defensive rebounds. The Trojans had 18 offensive rebounds to the Huskies’ 12.“We knew we could attack the defensive glass and hurt them over there, and that’s what we did,” Jovanovic said.Head coach Andy Enfield noted that he did not do anything special to call attention to Jovanovic.“Nikola is extremely talented and skilled,” Enfield said. “He played within himself tonight. Made some moves, and was able to get to the rim and finish. There’s nothing we did to say, ‘Go out and score 28 points.’ We just said, ‘Go play your game and have some fun.’”The Trojans used a 17-5 run to pull ahead late in the first half, as they were prolific from 3-point range. It took USC nearly 12 minutes to knock down its first triple when sophomore guard Elijah Stewart put the Trojans up 23-20. But the Men of Troy made three of their next four shots from distance, and freshman forward Bennie Boatwright’s connection at the 4:39 mark of the first half gave USC its first double-digit lead of the afternoon at 36-24.Jovanovic finished off the half with two pretty layups – one in traffic after a series of pump fakes and the second on a controlled take to the rim with the shot clock winding down.The Huskies, meanwhile, were held to just three field goals in the final eight minutes of the first half as the Trojans took a 44-33 lead into halftime.Washington’s star senior guard Andrew Andrews, who leads the Pac-12 in scoring at 21.3 points per game, had a subpar afternoon with just 15 points on 3-of-14 shooting as the Trojans were able to limit his driving ability.“It helped a lot,” McLaughlin said on the strategy against Andrews. “Without him being as effective and getting to the rack, it helped us in a major way.”Boatwright scored five quick points early on for USC, which jumped out to a 9-6 four minutes into the game. Boatwright, who finished with 15 points, was one of five Trojans who scored in double figures along with Katin Reinhardt, Jovanovic, McLaughlin, Reinhardt and Stewart.“We’ve been able to pick each other up,” Enfield said on the scoring balance. “If [certain] players have off nights, their teammates have been able to carry the scoring load and make plays. We don’t have anyone [like Andrew Andrews] who’s going to score 20 or 25 points a night. We have extremely talented offensive players. They share the ball. They bought in to making the extra pass. We lead the [Pac-12] in assists because we’re sharing the basketball.”The Men of Troy surely entered the game with the Jan. 3 loss at Washington on their minds. USC fell 87-85 to the Huskies on the road after blowing a 22-point second half lead.“It was a big learning experience for us,” Jovanovic said. “We were excited for this matchup. We prepared really well.”The Trojans improve to 17-5 and 6-3 in conference play, and are now just a half game out of first in the Pac-12. They also remain undefeated at home with a 13-0 record at Galen Center.Both teams entered Saturday on hot streaks; USC had won four of its last six games while Washington had won three of four, including a comeback win at UCLA Thursday.The Trojans were coming off a comfortable 81-71 win over Washington State Thursday night following a pair of losses in Oregon last weekend.They have four days off before taking on UCLA at Galen Center in a crosstown showdown next Thursday.last_img read more

Foulkes is the local hero – in extra time

first_img Local man Martin Foulkes deserved to win the English Men’s Mid Amateur Championship for the Logan Trophy at his home club of Worksop even if he had to win it twice.He looked to be cruising to the title with a comfortable four-shot lead with two holes to play when disaster struck. A quadruple-bogey eight at the 17th when he tangled with the punishing rough, saw the 36 year old finish with a level par 72 for 214, two under, and into a tie with Paul Kirkwood, who returned 71.It meant a sudden death playoff, Foulkes winning with a par four at the first hole after Kirkwood had missed the fairway and the green then failed with his par putt.“It proved more difficult that it should have been but I got there in the end,” said Foulkes. “I’ve possibly taken eight on the 17th before but I can’t remember when. But this is a massive win for me. I’ve won county events but never a national title.“It’s also massive for the club. Playing on your home course brings extra pressure and there were so many good players in the field. I’m delighted.”In ideal conditions but with the course asking its usual difficult questions, particularly on the greens, Foulkes began the day sharing the lead on two under with Scot David Primrose. But the Worksop man raced away, covering the front nine in 32 strokes with an eagle and three birdies.That saw him open a five-shot lead which no one managed to reduce. It looked a one-horse race with Foulkes seemingly cantering home. But the 17th came back to bite him.He drove into the left rough, gained a free drop from a staked tree, then took three more shots to escape before his approach finished short of the green. A chip and two putts later and his advantage had disappeared.“In hindsight I should have just chipped out,” Foulkes added. “After that my head was spinning. Before I teed off on 17 I was cruising. I didn’t know the situation but at six under, I didn’t think anyone had got to that and if I could finish four-three I would be O.K. Then that happened.”At the last he still had a chance to win in normal time if he could hole a lengthy putt. But, with his head still spinning, he had to settle for a par three and extra time.Kirkwood admitted he wasn’t expecting to be in a playoff. “I saw Martin having trouble on the 17th but I didn’t know that he had taken eight,” he said.“I had a good go at my putt in the playoff but I wasn’t expecting to do this well this week. “I’m a bit disappointed but fair play to Martin to make par and he deserved to win.”Surrey-based Primrose closed his successful week with 74 for 216, level par, and third spot with Lancashire’s Michael Hunt, who returned a second successive 70 for 217.Past champion Martin Young (74) from Hampshire and Justin Phelps (71) from Middlesex shared fifth place on 219, while Worcestershire’s Paul Scarrett, joint runner-up a year ago, posted 69, the best round of the day, for equal seventh spot.For the second successive day the tournament was graced by a hole-in-one. It was achieved by Stephen Brennan who sank his five iron tee shot at the 207-yard eighth hole.“The ball faded into the flag and my wife told me it had gone in,” said Yorkshire-based Brennan. “It was my sixth hole-in-one but only the second in competition.”For more information, visit the Logan Trophy webpage. 6 Jul 2014 Foulkes is the local hero – in extra time last_img read more

Jones accepts Gustafsson’s challenge at UFC 165

first_imgLight heavyweight champion Jon Jones, left, and Swedish challenger Alexander Gustafsson attend a news conference in Toronto on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013, ahead of the UFC 165 mixed martial arts event Saturday. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Neil Davidson)by Greg BeachamAP Sports WriterJon Jones saw all the zeros next to Floyd Mayweather Jr.’s name. He knows how much money the world’s best boxer made while dominating his opponent last weekend.If Jones does something similar to Alexander Gustafsson at UFC 165 in Toronto this weekend, he realizes the reward for being arguably the world’s top mixed martial artist is only a fraction of Mayweather’s $40 million-plus payday.And it doesn’t bother the UFC light heavyweight champion at all.“I’m grateful to make the money I make,” Jones said. “As a 26-year-old, I never would have imagined being in this position. And I’m also a person that doesn’t believe money is the key to life or happiness.”Jones (18-1) is the UFC’s main attraction at Air Canada Centre on Saturday when he steps into the octagon with Sweden’s Gustafsson (15-1), the latest 205-pounder to take a shot at ending Jones’ 2½-year championship reign. If Jones wins, he’ll break Tito Ortiz’s promotion record with his sixth successful title defense.But MMA’s probable pound-for-pound champion won’t get anything near the jaw-dropping reward given to Mayweather for schooling Saul Alvarez. The financial disparities for the stars of these related sports have been topics of contention for years.But don’t look for any indignation from Jones, who also has endorsement deals with Nike and Gatorade. The MMA champion and his two NFL-star brothers grew up on discounted school lunches, and he’s willing to be patient with a young sport he picked up just six years ago.“Just being comfortable makes me happy,” he said. “I don’t need those type of paydays. Would it be nice? It would be great to get paid the way other pro athletes get paid. I believe it will come. I’m just going to keep doing my part. … If somebody is going to pay me over a million dollars to fight, do you think I’m going to talk trash about that? No way. I’m so happy. I think $40 million, that’s like ridiculous, in a good way.”UFC 165 also features interim bantamweight titlist Renan Barao, unbeaten in 30 straight fights since his pro debut in 2005, defending his belt against former WEC champ Eddie Wineland. Heavyweights Brendan Schaub and Matt Mitrione also meet.Just like Canelo, Gustafsson is the most logical challenger to a dominant champion. He has won six straight fights since his only career loss in April 2010, and nobody doubts he deserves the title shot given to him by UFC President Dana White.Although Jones is a heavy favorite to defeat Gustafsson, the challenger is among the few 205-pound contenders who can match Jones’ impressive frame. At 6-foot-5, Gustafsson is slightly taller than Jones, although the champion’s 84½-inch wingspan is a bit broader.“It’s not always about reach,” said Gustafsson, who trains in Stockholm and San Diego. “It’s about footwork. It’s being fast, in and out. Stuff like that. I’m really making sure I’ve really done my homework here, and I’m super motivated.”But Jones is confident he can overcome any size similarities with his combination of study and skill.“I’m really excited to prove that my size is just a really small part of what makes me, me,” Jones said. “If my height was the reason for my dominance, I think half the NBA would be top guys in the UFC. Gustafsson, he’s really nothing like me.“What gets me motivated is he hasn’t had the life,” Jones added. “He wants to be the top dog. A lot of the guys I’ve fought before, they’ve been there and they didn’t appreciate it, and they lost it. Alexander has never been there, so there’s a fire that I’m sure he has that gets me fired up.”Jones, who combs through his opponents’ interviews for threads to unravel their psyche, also said he found motivation for the fight in a Swedish interview in which Gustafsson called him an immature bully.So dominant for so long, it’s not surprising Jones has to go looking for new motivations — and the next one after Gustafsson might be the next weight class.Jones has spent much of this promotion entertaining questions about his eventual move to heavyweight, even as he claims he plans to chase Anderson Silva’s all-division record of 10 consecutive title defenses. While Jones won’t set a date for a move, he’s already scoping out UFC heavyweight champion Cain Velasquez, saying: “There’s some things I could do athletically that Cain has never seen before.”“I want to do what makes the fans happy, and I know the fans want to see me take a heavyweight fight,” Jones added. “My biggest goal was just to establish this record at light heavyweight, and once this record is established, the day after the fight, the 22nd, we can start thinking about what’s going to be most interesting for the fans to see.“If Dana wants a certain fight that makes sense, after this fight would be the time to offer it to me.”And while not even a pay-per-view meeting with Velasquez would be likely to match the Mayweather-Alvarez fight’s jaw-dropping $150 million in television sales, Jones abides. He thinks MMA is much like himself — young, hungry and heading toward a lucrative future.“Right after the Mayweather fight, I got so many messages, and they were all the same: ‘Now it’s time for a real fight,’” Jones said.“‘It’s official, boxing is over, Mayweather is the only guy that matters left in the sport. After Mayweather, the sport is officially gone.’ It just seems like the fans are so ready for MMA to be bigger. It seems like in the fans’ eyes, this is the fight sport. I just think it’s going to take more time. What we’ve been able to do in our short history is remarkable.”Sports, Men’s sports, Mixed martial arts, Martial arts, AP Party, 1, Teragram, Floyd Mayweather Jr., Jon Jones, Men’s martial arts, Dana White, Saul Alvarez, Anderson Silva, 4479last_img read more