Harley says NRA allocations suggest Twin Towns by-pass delay

first_img 448 new cases of Covid 19 reported today WhatsApp WhatsApp Pinterest Previous articlePSNI recover van full of musical instruments stolen in DonegalNext articleSchool expansions announced for Stranorlar and Raphoe News Highland NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Twitter Google+ Facebook Stranorlar Councillor Martin Harley says he believes the Twin Towns by-pass will be delayed for at least another ten years.Cllr Harley says the fact that a substantial sum of money has been set aside by the NRA for improvements and safety works on the N15 between Barnesmore Gap and Lifford this year, suggesting the by-pass is not on the immediate agenda.Cllr Harley says following a recent meeting with the NRA, he believed the road would be substantially delayed. Now, he says, the NRA’s allocations announced yesterday suggest the delay will; be even longer……….[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/mharl1pm.mp3[/podcast] Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH center_img Twitter Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Help sought in search for missing 27 year old in Letterkenny RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Harley says NRA allocations suggest Twin Towns by-pass delay Google+ By News Highland – January 25, 2011 Newsx Adverts Facebooklast_img read more

Juanes Launches Campaign Against Child Recruitment in Colombia

first_img Singer songwriter Juanes launched the campaign “Dreaming is a right” on September 19 in Bogota to preclude forced recruitment of minors into armed groups. This effort expects to reach about 200,000 children and teenagers in three years. In the Cultural Center of Ciudad Bolívar, in southern Bogota, Juanes, songwriter Fonseca, and hip-hop artist Jeihhco, introduced their proposal to coach community leaders of 14 cities in Colombia on peace issues, so that they can offer life alternatives to children and teenagers, and preclude them from joining armed groups. The project, with an initial funding of 200,000 dollars, attempts to keep families and children away from these groups, mainly guerrillas and criminal gangs. In his speach, Juanes recalled that he was born in Medellin, the second largest Colombian city in the northeast, in a period when drug lord Pablo Escobar was at the peak of his career. “I lived during the 80s and music saved me. That’s why I believe in this. For me, art has been a transforming experience,” said the composer of “La camisa negra” (The Black Shirt) and “Odio por amor” (Love and Hate). “Our message goes to the children: don’t join that armed group or gang. Furthermore, it is also aimed at parents,” he explained. Even though it is unknown how many minors participate in Colombian armed groups, Colombian National Family Welfare Institute statistics show that since 1999, 4,935 of them have escaped from these organizations. Out of these escapees, 58.8% had been recruited against their will by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), 21.3% by extreme right wing paramilitary (demobilized at present), and 14.8% by the National Liberation Army (ELN). By Dialogo September 24, 2012last_img read more

The Most Important Abortion Case You Never Heard About

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Nina Martin ProPublicaEveryone considers Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that established a woman’s right to an abortion, to be the most important ruling ever on the issue by the Supreme Court. But this year, a lesser-known progeny of Roe occupies center stage in potentially the most momentous abortion case confronting the justices in a generation. After Roe established abortion rights, Planned Parenthood v. Casey reined them in, creating a new legal standard that gave states greater leeway to regulate the procedure. Many conservative legislatures took advantage to enact a series of increasingly tough laws that reproductive rights advocates argue have made it more difficult — and sometimes impossible — for women to obtain abortions. One of those states was Texas, which in 2013 enacted H.B. 2, an omnibus bill whose multiple provisions include restrictions, known as TRAP laws, targeting abortion providers. Now the Supreme Court is being asked to decide the constitutionality of two of these laws — one requiring clinics to meet the same building codes as other types of outpatient surgical centers, the other requiring abortion doctors to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles — that have already shut down more than half of the state’s 41 clinics and could close 8 more. When the court holds oral arguments in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt this week, the signs that protesters wave and the chants they chant will likely focus on Roe, but the outcome of the case will hinge on how justices interpret PP v. Casey. Abortion rights advocates contend the Texas rules are “sham” laws that pretend to protect women’s health while erecting so many hurdles — what PP v. Casey calls an “undue burden” — that abortion becomes “an abstract right that doesn’t have any meaning,” in the words of Stephanie Toti, a Center for Reproductive Rights attorney representing the clinics. Abortion foes insist that TRAP laws have a genuine medical purpose. They want the court to abandon the “undue burden” standard and allow lawmakers to pass abortion regulations as long as they have a “rational basis,” without having to prove that the laws actually benefit women. If the court goes along, it could have a sweeping impact on access to abortion across the country, but especially in conservative states in the South and Midwest, triggering not just a new wave of TRAP laws but other types of restrictions as well. PP v. Casey was decided in 1992, a time of many political parallels to today. Here is the background to the most important abortion decision you may never have heard about.The Rise of Incrementalism In the period immediately following Roe, abortion opponents mobilized and pushed for a federal constitutional amendment declaring that a fetus was a “person” entitled to “equal protection” under the 14th Amendment. But those efforts stalled. Abortion opponents began arguing for a new, pragmatic strategy known as “incrementalism.” Instead of attempting to overturn Roe outright, “you would argue that certain abortion restrictions and regulations were compatible with Roe,” said Mary Ziegler, a law professor at Florida State University and author of “After Roe: The Lost History of the Abortion Debate”. The idea was “to chip away at abortion rights until Roe was so incoherent and so full of holes that courts would finally get rid of it.” The approach required “an accurate understanding of political power, an assessment of what is politically achievable, [and] recognition of the imperfect world in which we live,” Clarke Forsythe, senior counsel for Americans United for Life, a key of architect of anti-abortion strategies, wrote in a law review article around that time. That translated into retail politics on the state level, the election of anti-abortion candidates, the passage of model legislation and the defense of those new laws in court. The approach was extremely effective: By the late 1980s, states had enacted dozens of restrictions. Moreover, the political makeup of the Supreme Court had turned more conservative, and the court’s jurisprudence on abortion had become splintered and, to some, confused. Forsythe, though, could read the tea leaves: The justices seemed ready to show “greater deference to state abortion laws — quite a contrast from the Roe decision.” The Pennsylvania LawThe battles over the Pennsylvania Abortion Control Act were a prime example of incrementalism in action. A version of the law passed in 1982 was largely struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court four years later. But instead of giving up on the law, legislators amended it; the version signed by Gov. Robert Casey Sr. in 1989 included a 24-hour waiting period, informed consent rules for women seeking abortions, parental consent rules for minors and a requirement that married women notify their husbands before terminating a pregnancy. Planned Parenthood and other abortion providers challenged these rules, too. But this time, the Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld all the provisions except spousal notification. Planned Parenthood appealed the case to the high court. Another Nasty Fight for the Supreme CourtConsider the events of 1991–1992. A presidential election loomed; the first war in Iraq was over; racial unrest after the acquittal of four white police officers in the videotaped beating of Rodney King left Los Angeles in flames. Massive job layoffs led to widespread economic resentment, and a blunt-talking billionaire emerged out of nowhere to become a populist hero and presidential spoiler (this one’s name was Ross Perot). On the abortion front, groups such as Operation Rescue were using aggressive, sometimes violent tactics to block access to abortion clinics. Then, in June 1991, an ailing Justice Thurgood Marshall resigned, touching off an epically ugly Supreme Court fight (although the one to replace Justice Antonin Scalia could make it seem like a model of decorum). Clarence Thomas’s confirmation in October 1991 meant Republican appointees now clearly held the fate of abortion rights in their hands. “Our concern was that when the [Pennsylvania] case went before the Supreme Court, the majority would use this opportunity to go much further [than the Third Circuit appeals court] and say that any law that was rational, including the complete banning of abortion, would be constitutional,” said Kathryn Kolbert, the lead ACLU attorney challenging the Pennsylvania law, who is now director of the Athena Center for Leadership Studies at Barnard College. That was what many abortion opponents were urging: Indeed, they had been lobbying for the “rational basis” standard since Roe. Figuring that they were going to lose anyway, Kolbert and her allies embarked on what author and legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin has called “one of the most audacious litigation strategies in Supreme Court history.” Instead of dragging the case out, they opted to “lose fast”: to push the case onto an exceptionally fast track in the hope it would be decided in the middle of the 1992 elections. And instead of making it a fight about Pennsylvania’s incremental law, they cast it as the ultimate showdown over Roe. This would let them take political advantage of the backlash that would ensue if abortion rights were gutted. According to Toobin, the conservative chief justice, William Rehnquist, resented this “transparent” ploy, but the court’s two liberal justices, Roe‘s author Harry Blackmun and John Paul Stevens, supported it and Rehnquist’s hand was forced. The case was argued on the last possible day of the 1991–92 term.Justice Kennedy’s CompromiseA central question facing the justices was whether the state could comply with Roe v. Wade while requiring women to go through additional hoops before getting an abortion. Oral arguments left both sides convinced that abortion rights were in peril; when Blackmun’s papers became public years later, they showed that Rehnquist had drafted an opinion overruling Roe. But then the trio of Republican-appointed moderates — Anthony Kennedy, Sandra Day O’Connor and David Souter — had second thoughts. Instead of joining Rehnquist, they made a secret deal to thwart him. The PP v. Casey decision, announced in June 1992, was stunning. By a 5–4 vote, the court reaffirmed Roe‘s “essential holding” that the right to abortion was protected by the Constitution. Not only that, the opinion embraced women’s equality as central to the abortion right in a way that Roe had not. With abortion, the liberty of the woman is at stake “in a sense unique to the human condition and so unique to the law,” the decision read. “Her suffering is too intimate and personal for the State to insist … upon its own vision of the woman’s role, however dominant that vision has been in the course of our history and of our culture.” The structure of the ruling was also highly unusual: It was a “plurality” opinion by the three moderates — Kennedy, O’Connor and Souter — with the court’s two liberals agreeing with some parts and disagreeing with others. Kolbert notes that the plurality’s emphasis on “stare decisis,” the principle that courts must follow precedent, was a sign that the justices had understood “the challenge to the institutional integrity of the court was real.” Justice Kennedy in particular “did not want the court to be perceived as changing course” on abortion, Kolbert said, simply because the majority’s ideological balance had shifted. But abortion foes like Paul Linton, later special counsel to the Thomas More Society, noted that a “moral ambiguity” about abortion pervaded the joint opinion, as well as “the nagging sense” that the three justices thought Roe had been wrongly decided but upheld it anyway: “That … does not promote respect for the judiciary, especially in a case where the stakes were so high.” Abortion opponents felt especially betrayed by Kennedy, a dismay that has only grown deeper over the years, as he has authored landmark opinions on gay rights and marriage equality. That’s one reason conservative expectations for the Texas abortion case are much more cautious today than they were for Casey. Kennedy “doesn’t have any clearly defined principles that allow you to predict what he’s going to do in any case, in any area,” said Lynn Wardle, a law professor at Brigham Young University who has written often about same-sex marriage and abortion. “The best test for being able to predict what he will do is to lick your finger and hold it out to the wind.” A Clouded Victory for Abortion RightsEven as PP v. Casey upheld the right to abortion, the plurality opinion took Roe v. Wade apart, starting with its foundation, the trimester framework. Under Roe, states were almost completely banned from regulating abortion during the first trimester. They had more flexibility to pass laws protecting a woman’s health in the second trimester, and they could prohibit most abortions in the third. In contrast, Casey declared, “[T]he State has legitimate interests from the outset of the pregnancy in protecting the health of the woman and the life of the fetus that may become a child.” Instead of the trimester approach, Casey established viability — the point at which the fetus can survive outside the womb — as the new dividing line for determining whether an abortion law was valid or not. (When Roe was decided, fetuses weren’t considered viable until 28 weeks, or the third trimester; by 1992, medical advances had pushed the line to around 24 weeks.) Before viability, Casey said, states could only try to persuade a woman not to have an abortion; laws that made it difficult or impossible for her to act on her decision did not pass muster. After viability, though, states could restrict abortions pretty much however they liked. More significantly, Casey also rejected Roe‘s “strict scrutiny” test for evaluating abortion restrictions — a test that had stymied most state efforts to regulate the procedure — replacing it with the looser “undue burden” standard, which Justice O’Connor had proposed in dissents to earlier abortion rulings. An undue burden was defined as any law that had “the purpose or effect of placing a substantial obstacle in the path of a woman seeking an abortion.” Importantly for the pending Texas abortion case, this reasoning applied to medical rules as well as other restrictions: Although “the State may enact regulations to further the health or safety of a woman seeking an abortion,” the court held, “unnecessary health regulations that have the purpose or effect of presenting a substantial obstacle to a woman seeking an abortion impose an undue burden.” Still, the court reiterated, just because a law had “the incidental effect of making it more difficult or more expensive to procure an abortion” wasn’t enough to invalidate it. Under the new standard, the Pennsylvania rules aimed at giving women more information and time to reflect on their decisions were valid. Only the spousal notification provision was deemed to be an undue burden and thus unconstitutional: “A state may not give to a man the kind of dominion over his wife that parents exercise over their children.”Scalia’s Dissent: “Hopelessly Unworkable”Casey prompted one of Antonin Scalia’s most famous and blistering dissents: The plurality’s reasoning, he fumed, was “really more than one should have to bear.” Much as he disliked Roe, at least the trimester framework laid down clear guidelines, he wrote. In contrast, Casey‘s “undue burden” standard was “created largely out of whole cloth,” “inherently manipulable,” and “hopelessly unworkable,” giving individual judges much more power to inject their own private beliefs into the abortion debate. “Its authors believe they are bringing to an end a troublesome era in the history of our Nation and of our Court,” Scalia scoffed. But he said the abortion wars would only be stoked by “this jurisprudence of confusion” — a view that would help frame the conversation about Casey for the next two decades. More recently, abortion rights advocates have fought back, arguing that Casey‘s reputation as “squishy law” is undeserved and part of a long effort to delegitimitize the undue burden standard, much as critics have sought to undermine Roe. “Excuse me for simplifying, but there’s a there there,” said Reva Siegel, a Yale Law professor who has written extensively on abortion and gender equity. One reason Casey may be so misunderstood: It gave each side half a loaf, so neither embraced it, even though it reflected how most ordinary people felt. The decision “speaks to an America divided by conflict over abortion,” Siegel said. “It’s summoning each side to engage respectfully with the other.”Reshaping the Debate: “Partial Birth” The 18 months or so immediately following Casey “were probably a low point in the history of the pro-life movement,” said Michael New, a conservative pundit and visiting assistant professor at Ave Maria University who has written often about abortion. At first most new restrictions introduced in the states were modeled closely on the Pennsylvania law. Then abortion opponents hit upon the mid–1990s version of last year’s Planned Parenthood videos: the rare but gruesome technique for third-trimester abortions that they dubbed “partial-birth abortion.”A flurry of bans on the procedure re-energized the incrementalists, providing new opportunities “to slowly convince [average] Americans that they’re just as uncomfortable about abortion as pro-life folks are,” Jack Balkin, a professor of constitutional law at Yale University, told PBS’ Frontline in 2005. That meant more chances to challenge not just Roe, but also Casey. Said Forsythe, of Americans United for Life: “The procedure served to humanize the unborn and produced a sea change in American public opinion on the issue.” Ultimately, it was the sea change on the Supreme Court during the administration of George W. Bush that mattered most. In 2007, the court upheld the federal ban on partial-birth abortion; Kennedy wrote the majority opinion using language suggesting he might be open to tighter abortion restrictions despite the undue burden standard, especially in areas of “medical uncertainty.” Abortion, he said, was “a decision … fraught with emotional consequence,” one in which women would “struggle with grief more anguished and sorrow more profound” if they really understood what this particular procedure involved. Conservative strategists saw the ruling as a victory not just against partial-birth abortion but against Casey. How Big a Burden?It took the huge Tea Party wave of 2010 for abortion opponents to gain the political clout to push through laws like Texas’ H.B. 2. Since 2011, states in the South and Midwest have passed more than 300 abortion restrictions — TRAP laws, rules for how medication abortions may be performed, bans on abortion after 20 weeks (and sometimes earlier), longer waiting periods and greater impediments to teenagers seeking abortions without parental approval. The central question raised by many of these laws goes directly to the 24-year-old ruling in Casey: How undue must a restriction become before it renders the right to abortion meaningless?Even before Scalia’s death, the outcome of the Texas case was anyone’s guess; his demise makes it even more uncertain. The biggest question has always been whether Kennedy, the last remaining PP v. Casey co-author on the Supreme Court, will see that decision as an important part of his legacy that he wants to defend, or whether he will be inclined to give states more leeway to restrict the abortion right.As Casey itself shows, all kinds of court alliances and plurality rulings are possible.What is clear: The Texas case, whatever its outcome, probably won’t settle the abortion issue any more than Casey did.ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter.(Featured photo credit: Duncan Lock/Wikimedia Commons)last_img read more

Brittney Sykes’ 31 points lead Syracuse women’s basketball to 82-72 victory at No. 19 Virginia Tech

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Brittney Sykes matched a career-high 31 points, Alexis Peterson added 22 and Briana Day became the first-ever SU player to reach 1,000 points and 1,000 rebounds Sunday afternoon in Syracuse’s 82-72 victory at No. 19 Virginia Tech.SU has now won six of its last eight games and two straight against Top 20 teams. Sunday’s win also marks SU’s fourth against a nationally ranked opponent this season, setting a program regular-season record.“They just really played gutsy,” Syracuse head coach Quentin Hillsman said. “When you win games on the road, that’s about grinding and playing hard.”The Orange entered Sunday having lost four of its last five away from the Carrier Dome. It had struggled against conference opponents, getting outscored to Florida State, Louisville and Georgia Tech by a combined 43 points. Sunday in Blacksburg, Virginia, SU scored 82 points a week after routing then-No. 14 Miami, 81-48 at home.Peterson and Sykes, the nation’s top-scoring backcourt, combined for 33 of SU’s 49 points in the first half. Sykes finished with 31 points on three 3-pointers and 12-of-17 shooting from the field. She chipped in three steals.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“She was just aggressive in attacking,” Hillsman said. “She played downhill, she played at the rim.”Peterson shot only 6-of-18 and committed seven turnovers, but dished out 11 assists and scored 22 points. Day, Syracuse’s senior center, scored 21 points, blocked four shots and grabbed 11 rebounds to become the program’s all-time leading rebounder with 1,005 career boards. For the third time this year Sykes, Peterson and Day each had at least 20 points.“If she stays in and plays her game, we’re going to be OK,” Hillsman said. “That was the biggest thing in the game: Keeping her on the floor.”The Orange shot 7-for-16 from 3-point range, a 43.8 percent clip, and hit 15-of-17 free-throw attempts. The Hokies trailed by 16 at the half and pulled within six at the 2:46 mark before Syracuse finished the game on an 11-2 run to seal the victory.Syracuse looks to continue its 16-game home winning streak when it returns home Thursday for a matchup with Pittsburgh (12-9, 3-5) at 7 p.m. Comments Published on January 29, 2017 at 6:24 pm Contact Matthew: [email protected] | @MatthewGut21last_img read more

LeBron James dominates as Lakers crush Warriors

first_img“What we’re trying to get accomplished is dominant defense and extremely selfless offense… and I thought both of those areas for us tonight were done at a really high level.” pic.twitter.com/JQCBn8UgDa— Spectrum SportsNet (@SpectrumSN) October 17, 2019 Handles like a guard. Passes like a guard. Dominates like nothing else.(📺: @SpectrumSN + @espn) pic.twitter.com/HKMI8leLFf— Los Angeles Lakers (@Lakers) October 17, 2019 AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersThe full weight of what the Lakers (3-2) could be started sinking in Wednesday night, as they pulverized the overmatched Warriors 126-93, the largest margin of victory they’ve enjoyed during the three meetings with Golden State this month.And they’re going to play again Friday night – which can’t be an easy thought for the winless Warriors (0-3), the former benchmark of the NBA.Coach Frank Vogel expected his lead rotation players to play the most minutes they had yet, in an effort to shake off some lingering rust from China and see how effective they could be in substantial appearances. They didn’t disappoint.Out of pick-and-roll sets with James and Davis, the Lakers were able to create plenty: a Davis dunk, a lob to JaVale McGee, kickouts to Avery Bradley for a sudden stream of 3-pointers. It begged the question: How are opponents going to stop the simple, yet foundational sets of the Lakers with two stars running the show?“He’s a great passer,” Davis said of James. “So when he comes off pick and rolls or come off a down screen, he draws a lot of attention and usually two guys go to him, which leaves me open roving to the basket or a guy shooting on the weak side. The more and more we get opportunities to be in the pick and roll, the more effective we can be at it.” The evening was guided by the steady hands of James (18 points), who threaded passes between defenders and gracefully into the waiting hands of shooters for 11 assists in just 25 minutes. The most impressive of the dimes came late in the third quarter, as James charged the rim with two defenders draped over him, and managed to sling a left-handed pass over his head to a waiting Danny Green, who drilled a 3-pointer from the corner to extend the Lakers’ lead to 35 points. James later acknowledged it was “up there” among his career assist highlights. Green said he felt the heat to not waste the pass.“Wasn’t nobody within 30 feet of me,” Green said, “but probably the most pressure I’ve had in a long time to make a shot.”Vogel took James out of the game in the ensuing timeout: What more did he have to prove?Davis’ shot was more spotty than it’s been for much of the preseason, but he also had a deft passing touch and finished with eight assists to go with eight points and 10 rebounds. Three times, he found McGee for a dunk at the rim, showcasing the promise of the team’s double-big lineups that Davis prefers.It helped immensely that a team that has been shooting under 30 percent from long range finally came alive from beyond the arc. Bradley, who started the preseason 0 for 7 on 3-point shots, nailed four of his five attempts, finishing with 18 points. Returning from calf soreness that’s kept him sidelined, Quinn Cook dialed up 16 points on 6-for-9 shooting against the Warriors team that let him walk in free agency.“We saw it on tape last year,” Vogel said. “You know, he played in the NBA Finals last year, big minutes and important minutes. And he’s a terrific player. It’s not just his shooting, it’s his overall floor game. And he’s gonna help us this year.”For the night, the Lakers shot 15 for 30 from 3-point range.All this came without the benefit of forward Kyle Kuzma (left foot stress reaction), who has missed the entire preseason so far, as well as veteran guard Rajon Rondo (rest), who played major minutes in the first three preseason games.While two-time league MVP Steph Curry sat out as well, Golden State did have Draymond Green (10 points) and D’Angelo Russell (23 points) – both of whom showed discomfort while being hassled by the Lakers’ defense. The Warriors shot under 37 percent for the evening.The preseason finale for both teams is Friday night at the new Chase Center in San Francisco. Anybody can read the defense on the ground. @KingJames can do it mid-air.(📺: @SpectrumSN + @espn) pic.twitter.com/3ZeecTpaL5— Los Angeles Lakers (@Lakers) October 17, 2019 PreviousLos Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James, left, jokes around with center DeMarcus Cousins on the bench during the second half of the team’s preseason NBA basketball game against the Golden State Warriors on Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 126-93. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)The Lakers’ Anthony Davis defends against the Warriors’ Marquese Chriss during the first half of Wednesday’s preseason game at Staples Center. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James, center, shoots as Golden State Warriors forward Alfonzo McKinnie, left, and guard Jacob Evans defend during the second half of a preseason NBA basketball game Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 126-93. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: LeBron James #23 of the Los Angeles Lakers dribbles upcourt during the first half of a game against the Golden State Warriors at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: LeBron James #23 of the Los Angeles Lakers looks on during the first half of a game against the Golden State Warriors at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Golden State Warriors forward Draymond Green, right, shoots as Los Angeles Lakers forward Anthony Davis defends during the first half of a preseason NBA basketball game Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Head Coach Steve Kerr of the Golden State Warriors coaches from the bench during the first half of a game against the Los Angeles Lakers at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Dwight Howard #39 of the Los Angeles Lakers gains position over Kavion Pippen #31 of the Golden State Warriors during the first half of a game at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Marquese Chriss #32 of the Golden State Warriors dunks the ball during the first half of a game against the Los Angeles Lakers at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: LeBron James #23 of the Los Angeles Lakers looks on during the first half of a game against the Golden State Warriors at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Draymond Green #23 of the Golden State Warriors and Danny Green #14 of the Los Angeles Lakers lunge for a loose ball during the first half of a game at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Kavion Pippen #31 of the Golden State Warriors defends against Anthony Davis #3 of the Los Angeles Lakers during the first half of a game at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Kavion Pippen #31 of the Golden State Warriors drives to the basket as Jared Dudley #10 of the Los Angeles Lakers defends during the first half of a game at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Lakers center Dwight Howard, right, shoots as Golden State Warriors forward Eric Paschall defends during the first half of a preseason NBA basketball game Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Golden State Warriors guard D’Angelo Russell shoots as Los Angeles Lakers forward Anthony Davis defends during the first half of a preseason NBA basketball game Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James, right, shoots as Golden State Warriors guard D’Angelo Russell watches during the first half of a preseason NBA basketball game Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James adjusts his headband during the first half of the team’s preseason NBA basketball game against the Golden State Warriors on Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Golden State Warriors guard Ky Bowman, center, shoots as Los Angeles Lakers forward Anthony Davis, right, defends while forward LeBron James watches during the first half of an NBA preseason basketball game Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Lakers forward Anthony Davis, right, shoots as Golden State Warriors forward Draymond Green defends during the first half of a preseason NBA basketball game Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Lakers center JaVale McGee, center, and Golden State Warriors forward Marquese Chriss, right, reach for the opening tip as Golden State Warriors guard D’Angelo Russell watches during the first half of a preseason NBA basketball game Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Lakers forward LeBron James gets past Warriors forward Draymond Green on his way to the basket during the first half of Wednesday’s preseason game at Staples Center. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Golden State Warriors guard D’Angelo Russell reaches for a ball as it goes out of bounds during the first half of the team’s preseason NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers on Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James dribbles during the first half of the team’s preseason NBA basketball game against the Golden State Warriors on Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James congratulates forward Anthony Davis during a timeout in the first half of the team’s preseason NBA basketball game against the Golden State Warriors on Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: LeBron James #23 of the Los Angeles Lakers looks on during the first half of a game against the Golden State Warriors at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Devontae Cacok #12 of the Los Angeles Lakers dribbles to the basket during the second half of a game against the Golden State Warriorsat Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Anthony Davis #3 of the Los Angeles Lakers dribbles the ball during the second half of a game against the Golden State Warriors t Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Kentavious Caldwell-Pope #1 of the Los Angeles Lakers dribbles into the defense of Ky Bowman #12 of the Golden State Warriors during the second half of a game at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Dwight Howard #39 of the Los Angeles Lakers battles for a rebound during the second half of a game against the Golden State Warriors at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Juan Toscano-Anderson #95 of the Golden State Warriors defends against LeBron James #23 of the Los Angeles Lakers during the second half of a game at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Anthony Davis #3 of the Los Angeles Lakers dribbles the ball during the second half of a game against the Golden State Warriors t Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: LeBron James #23 and Anthony Davis #3 of the Los Angeles Lakers look on during the second half of a game against the Golden State Warriors at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: LeBron James #23 of the Los Angeles Lakers dribbles upcourt during the second half of a game against the Golden State Warriors at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Jordan Poole #3 of the Golden State Warriors battles Zach Norvell Jr. #21 of the Los Angeles Lakers for a loose ball during the second half of a game at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Lakers guard Quinn Cook, left, shoots as Golden State Warriors guard Ky Bowman defends during the second half of a preseason NBA basketball game Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 126-93. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Marquese Chriss #32 and Alfonzo McKinnie #28 of the Golden State Warriors battle JaVale McGee #7 of the Los Angeles Lakers for position during the second half of a game at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: LeBron James #23 of the Los Angeles Lakers dribbles through the defense of Draymond Green #23, Alfonzo McKinnie #28 and Jacob Evans #10 of the Golden State Warriors during the second half of a game at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Kentavious Caldwell-Pope #1 of the Los Angeles Lakers battles Eric Paschall #7 of the Golden State Warriors for a loose ball during the second half of a game at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: LeBron James #23 and Anthony Davis #3 of the Los Angeles Lakers talk with official Bernie Adams during the second half of a game at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: Anthony Davis #3 of the Los Angeles Lakers defends against a shot by Draymond Green #23 of the Golden State Warriors during the second half of a game against the Los Angeles Lakers at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Golden State Warriors guard Jordan Poole, left, shoots as Los Angeles Lakers guard Kentavious Caldwell-Pope defends during the second half of a preseason NBA basketball game Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 126-93. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Golden State Warriors guard Jordan Poole, left, shoots as Los Angeles Lakers guard Kentavious Caldwell-Pope defends during the second half of a preseason NBA basketball game Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 126-93. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James, right, tries to move by Golden State Warriors forward Alfonzo McKinnie during the first half of a preseason NBA basketball game Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Golden State Warriors guard Ky Bowman, right, shoots as Los Angeles Lakers forward Devontae Cacok defends during the second half of a preseason NBA basketball game Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 126-93. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 16: LeBron James #23 of the Los Angeles Lakers looks on during the secondhalf of a game against the Golden State Warriors at Staples Center on October 16, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James, left, jokes around with center DeMarcus Cousins on the bench during the second half of the team’s preseason NBA basketball game against the Golden State Warriors on Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 126-93. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)The Lakers’ Anthony Davis defends against the Warriors’ Marquese Chriss during the first half of Wednesday’s preseason game at Staples Center. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)NextShow Caption1 of 46The Lakers’ Anthony Davis defends against the Warriors’ Marquese Chriss during the first half of Wednesday’s preseason game at Staples Center. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)ExpandLOS ANGELES — A lone voice momentarily pierced the air at Staples Center as LeBron James lined up along the wing with the ball: “LeBron, work him!”It was only minutes into Wednesday night’s preseason game, but even the fans knew what to expect at that point. The Warriors did too – they just couldn’t stop it.James took a few steps inside, drawing a double-team before bouncing it ahead to a gliding Anthony Davis, who rolled in for a dunk. Less than three weeks on the court together, and the two are making the Lakers’ offense tick like a Swiss watch.“It’s my job and it’s A.D.’s job – because we attract so many defenders and so many eyes – to put the ball on time, on target to our offensive guys and that’s no matter who is out on the floor, no matter if they make it or not, just to give them the ball where it needs to be,” James said. “To where they can just catch, dunk; catch, shoot; catch, lay it up. And that’s it.” LeBron said it “sounds good” to have less of a burden on his shoulders this year, with a not so subtle tone of skepticism.”I’m born to have workload. It is who I am, both on and off the court.” pic.twitter.com/4PY43Rr0M6— Kyle Goon (@kylegoon) October 17, 2019 Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Man Utd bank on free-scoring Fernandes to quieten fans’ fury

first_imgUnlike many products from the Portuguese league, Fernandes is making the move to England in the prime of his career rather than as a precocious youngster.One of those young talents went onto become one of United’s best ever players when Cristiano Ronaldo made the move from Lisbon to Manchester in 2003 as an 18-year-old.Portuguese football expert Tom Kundert believes the timing on Fernandes’s transfer means he is well-equipped to make the step up to the Premier League.“In 25 years watching Sporting live every other week Bruno Fernandes is undoubtedly the best player I’ve seen in the green and white,” said Kundert.“Yes, Sporting had (Luis) Figo and Ronaldo, but they weren’t the players at (Jose) Alvalade they’d become. Fernandes is the finished article. Ripe for a bigger challenge.”A lack of leadership has been highlighted as one of United’s problems in recent seasons. Harry Maguire was recently handed the captaincy after less than six months at the club.Fernandes was forced to grow up fast in Lisbon, captaining Sporting through a institutional crisis when a group of angry fans attacked some players at the club’s training ground in May 2018.Many of Sporting’s stars choose to rescind their contracts and leave following the incident, but Fernandes stayed and signed a new contract before going onto score 32 goals last season.That experience could be important in helping lead United out of their own toxic period. Executive vice-chairman Ed Woodward’s house was targeted with flares and graffiti on Tuesday.With United languishing fifth in the Premier League, six points off the top four, animosity towards Woodward and the club’s American owners, the Glazer family, has risen among the club’s fanbase in recent weeks.They are now banking on another lavish purchase in Fernandes to quieten that discontent. Sporting Lisbon’s Bruno Fernandes has reportedly been signed by Manchester United.London, United Kingdom | AFP |  Manchester United finally secured a deal to sign Portuguese international midfielder Bruno Fernandes on Wednesday ending a long-running chase of the 25-year-old.United are badly in need of midfield reinforcements due to the absence of Paul Pogba and Scott McTominay through injury, whilst Pogba’s future at the club beyond the end of the season is very much in doubt.Fernandes will cost the Red Devils an initial 55 million euros (£47 million, $61 million) with up to 25 million euros more in performance-related add-ons.However, United know to their cost that even such a huge fee is no guarantee of success after seven years of decline since former manager Alex Ferguson retired in 2013, despite splashing over £1 billion on transfers.So, who is Fernandes and can he help lead a revival of United’s fortunes?Goals galoreOne area where Fernandes clearly fits United’s needs is a goal threat with top scorer Marcus Rashford sidelined by a back injury to compound the absence of Pogba and McTominay.He scored 63 times in 137 appearances for Sporting since returning to his homeland in 2017 after spells with Novara, Udinese and Sampdoria in Italy.Of those 47 have come in the last season-and-a-half as he has blossomed into a potent threat, earning comparisons with Chelsea manager Frank Lampard – the top scoring midfielder in Premier League history.“He is a complete player, and if you ask me to compare Bruno with a player, I will say Frank Lampard,” former Sporting manager Carlos Carvalhal told talkSPORT.Fernandes’s ability to shoot from range could be the key to unlocking deep-lying defences that Solskjaer’s men have struggled to break down this season.Moreover, he has also been a creative force during his time at Sporting, providing 42 assists in total and creating the most chances in the Portuguese league for the past two seasons.‘Finished article’ Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

Support the Conchetta House Through the Pepsi Refresh Project! Vote Now!

first_imgFor more information about the Conchetta House and their work, visit their Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/ConchettaHouse?sk=info Facebook2Tweet0Pin0By MorganSummer is usually devoted to vacations and leisure time for most people. Even though the majority of us are feeling the pinch of this economy at present, usually we know where our next meal is coming from, have the ability to afford clothing and school supplies for our children, or enjoy a nice place to kick back and relax. Even if we are not where we would like to be this Summer, it always is necessary to remind ourselves that there are those around us who are less fortunate and could use a hand. One does not need to go to Africa to find hunger, or Haiti or Japan to find the orphaned, or whole families who have had their lives torn apart. There are people in our own neighborhoods, schools and cities that need our help as Summer fades and Winter approaches with a fresh set of challenges.In Thurston County, there is no shortage of ways to positively impact our community for the better. Local residents and businesses have taken it upon themselves to create ways to help those in need in preparation for Fall. Some of them, like supporting the Conchetta House (an organization that helps single-parents and their children to find housing while completing college) can be as easy as a click or a text! Located in East Olympia, the Conchetta house is currently supporting four mothers and eight children by matching them with subsidized housing and other critical resources. However, their efforts require money, the Conchetta House needs your help to win much needed funding from Pepsi’s Refresh Project. The project is devoted to awarding grant money to the organizations or community start-ups with the highest votes, in various amounts each month. The Conchetta House needs at least $50,000 to continue their work and expand their ability to take on more families. You have until early November to get all of your votes in. You can vote up to five times per day, or if you look under a lucky Pepsi bottle cap, you could win 100 power votes to put toward various ideas of your choice. To vote, just text 108155 to 73774 or visit their idea page right away at: http://www.refresheverything.com/conchettahouse-helps-single-parentslast_img read more