Hughes ‘hopes Chelsea drop Terry’ and Murphy tipped to stay

first_imgThe Daily Star claim Mark Hughes thinks Chelsea should drop John Terry for this weekend’s west London derby.Picking up on a remark made by the QPR boss, it is suggested that Hughes is hoping Terry will not feature in the game at Stamford Bridge, thus avoiding more controversy in the Anton Ferdinand race row.There has been speculation over whether Rangers’ players will agree to shake Terry’s hand ahead of the kick-off.Asked whether they would do so, Hughes said: “I’ve not looked that far ahead. He’s got a busy week, perhaps he won’t play. Let’s hope so.”Meanwhile, The Daily Mail report that Danny Murphy is set to sign a new contract to stay at Fulham despite interest from QPR.Advertising on West London Sport  Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Monitoring monsoon deficits, current estimates don’t give cause for concern, says Agriculture Minister

first_imgWith monsoon rains making tardy progress, which has led to delayed kharif crop sowing and left large parts of southern and western India in the grip of extreme water scarcity, Agriculture Minister Narendra Singh Tomar said the government was keeping a close watch on the situation.“I agree that drought is a cause for concern. It is not new for India,” he told reporters on Tuesday. “Right now, the current estimates do not indicate reasons for concern… the government is prepared and the Ministry is keeping a close watch. We are concerned. By God’s grace, such a situation will not arise.”One month after the scheduled onset of the monsoon, there is a 32% rainfall deficit and kharif sowing of foodgrains has barely reached two-thirds of the normal acreage covered by this time. As of June 28, farmers had sown rice, pulses, coarse cereals and oilseeds on 63 lakh hectares of land; the average coverage for the corresponding period over the last five years was almost 97 lakh hectares.The biggest lags are seen in the sowing of pulses and oilseeds — which are dry land crops almost entirely dependent on monsoon rains — in Maharashtra, Karnataka and Madhya Pradesh. If the rains pick up in July, as forecast by the Indian Meteorological Department, sowing is also expected to gather momentum.The Centre’s announcement of minimum support prices for kharif crops — ideally done before sowing starts so that farmers can make crop decisions based on expected prices — has also been delayed this year. “It is later than usual, mostly due to elections,” Agriculture Secretary Sanjay Agarwal told The Hindu. “Decisions could not be taken while the code of conduct was in place.” He also indicated that farmers could expect the MSPs to rise, as the cost of production had gone up in comparison to last year. “MSPs were one-and-a-half times the cost of production last year. That should be maintained,” he said.Apart from land-owning farmers, agricultural workers and rural labourers have also been hit hard by the delay in the monsoon. Facing the spectre of drought, more workers are dependent on work provided by the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee scheme. “Every day, about a crore labourers are coming for MGNREGA work,” a senior official from the Rural Development Ministry said, speaking on condition of anonymity. “Usually, in the first three months of the year [April-June], we give about 75 crore man-days of work. This year, it is more than 83 crore,” the official said, indicating that funds were tight due to the increased demand for work. “This is all because of the delayed monsoon. Once agricultural work begins, the demand will be contained a bit.”last_img read more

Perpetual girls star Solomon commits to NU

first_imgChina furious as Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ NU is hoping to groom Solomon as its next star what with Jaja Santiago soon to graduate.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Another vape smoker nabbed in Lucena In a breaking report by The Volleyball Reporter, the Inquirer’s newest multiplatform volleyball resource, Solomon joined Perpetual coach Otie Camangian Tuesday in sealing the deal with NU management.The 6-foot-1 opposite thus joins the F. Jhocson crew and is scheduled to enrol on Wednesday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsAccording to NU’s Athletic Director for Athletic Programs, Sheila Nisperos, the Grade 10 transferee will already be eligible to play for NU’s girls’ volleyball team in Season 80.Solomon, one of the most hotly-recruited spikers in the high school ranks, was recently picked to join the Philippine national youth team which is Singapore-bound this week for the ASEAN secondary volleyball meet. View comments Chief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST PLAY LIST 01:00Chief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR LOOK: Jane De Leon meets fellow ‘Darna’ Marian Rivera MOST READ Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Perpetual Biñan star spiker Alyssa Solomon has committed to playing for National University in the UAAP.ADVERTISEMENT El Nido residents told to vacate beach homes Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ LATEST STORIES Petron blanks F2, closes in on PSL titlelast_img read more

9 months agoBrighton boss Hughton won’t blame Gross for Salah pen

first_imgBrighton boss Hughton won’t blame Gross for Salah penby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBrighton boss Chris Hughton insists he doesn’t blame Pascal Gross for Liverpool’s winning penalty on Saturday.Gross was penalised for a foul on Salah, which gave the Egyptian the chance to break the deadlock from the penalty spot, and Hughton showed his understanding towards the incident.“You’ve also got to feel for Pascal — he was up against arguably the best player in the country in that position.“It was one-v-one and he needs to have help. There’s no blame on Pascal, I think he did a great job to track him [Salah] anyway.“These are the moments in the game that Liverpool generally find because of the quality that they’ve got.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Sports writers The sports beat itself is not the beat

To say that I am lucky to be the sports editor of Ohio State’s daily student newspaper is a gross understatement. In fact, I’m spoiled rotten. I get a front-row seat to some of the best sporting events in the country so that I may observe, chronicle and comment on them. My objective in this privileged position, as I understand it, is to help keep an unbiased history, and occasionally impart personal opinion, on the sporting happenings taking place during the relatively small window of time that I’ll be on this campus. And so, in an ideal world, I should think professional sportswriters of America have these same aims, to inform the citizenry of their publication services. At various times, and particularly in recent weeks, though, I’ve observed sports scribes taking pot shots at each other’s work, bickering about issues that only affect sports writers, and really just serving ourselves and not our respective audiences. We’ve lost our way as sportswriters. Heck, I almost lost my own way yesterday. Here’s an example: Orlando Sentinel sports columnist Mike Bianchi, prior to coming to Ohio Stadium to cover Central Florida football’s Saturday game against OSU, accused members of the Buckeyes’ football media troupe of “printing lies” and generally supporting a perceived agenda of first-year coach Urban Meyer with “fluffy” stories. “No, these charges don’t come from some paranoid politician or neurotic football coach; they come from another member of media: Me,” Bianchi wrote in a Sept. 7 column. Bianchi was firing back at a commentary from the Columbus-based website, theozone.net, which faulted him for sparring with Meyer during a Big Ten teleconference. There’s a way to debate the coverage of an event or issue, Here’s another example: OSU’s own “Twitter-gate” scandal. Like outlets and writer-personalities all over America, The Lantern reported on OSU athletics spokesman Jerry Emig’s request to media to delay tweeting content from Meyer’s press conferences until the event was over. In an email to The Lantern, Emig said the policy was intended as a courtesy to both reporters and football personnel. It was not until after the press conference, Emig said, that he was told Meyer’s press conference was being broadcast live by Columbus radio station WBNS 97.1 FM and streamed on the athletic department’s website. “I simply asked those in attendance to not tweet while an interview was taking place,” Emig told The Lantern. “Once I was reminded of (the live broadcast) – after the press conference – I realized that courtesy or no courtesy, we can’t ask people to delay tweeting. So even though many in attendance were supportive, we won’t ask to delay tweeting any longer.” The Lantern was the first to learn that this request was being lifted, and after I tweeted the news out to the world from our sports Twitter account, the news was re-tweeted by members of the media. Fan interest in that particular matter, though? I don’t think there was a morsel of it. Again, we’re talking about our audiences – there’s a market for new and social media that would take great interest in that story, but a Buckeyes’ season ticket holder? Doubtful, and it’s reckless to assume the audience will gobble up any given sportswriter’s every experience. I’ll grant you this, there was concern that our free-speech rights were being infringed upon, and that had broader appeal because of the inherent legal issues that could accompany a situation like that. But does the average OSU football fan care if it takes an extra half-hour to hear about Meyer’s assessment of his players? I think they’re just happy to consume Meyer’s brutally direct evaluation of the program, even if it arrives a bit late. Finally, we arrive at the example I almost presented to the world via Twitter yesterday. I got all hot and bothered by the fact that Meyer, speaking at his weekly press conference Monday, said he wasn’t aware of a Sunday water main explosion that caused 2,000 OSU students to be uprooted from their dormitories and displaced. I don’t want to delve too deeply into my feelings about Meyer’s lack of knowledge about the water main explosion, but you could say I was bothered by it. So I took to Twitter and saw that some were making light of the fact that Meyer was even asked a question about the water main explosion, a question I assigned a Lantern reporter to ask. Well, I had really had it at that point. I fired off tweets that hinted at my feelings about 1.) the validity of the question and 2.) how I felt about Meyer having no knowledge of this major incident on campus. Then a couple people disagreed with me – I was really, truly ready spout off. But I didn’t spout off – I had to stop. The simple fact is that some blogger’s opinion of a question asked at a press conference doesn’t matter, nor does my criticism of he or she matter. Think about it: as OSU football beat writers, we’re covering the team, not the beat itself. In that moment, as in the aforementioned cases, the beat itself became the beat and that is simply a pigheaded practice. I imagine that sports writers’ respective audiences care about our finished products – accuracy in reporting, good writing and informative content. Do we really think they care more about our own petty, online squabbles? No, of course they don’t. Does anyone care to hear me critique the sports-writing practices of UWeekly? Do you care to read about what UWeekly thinks about me? I think (and hope) you’d prefer to consume quality coverage of the teams you care about. Period. As a student journalist, my head is buried in journalism texts on a daily basis. Maybe that constant exposure to the fundamentals of journalism, and the fundamentals of sports writing, make it too easy to for me to call for all sportswriters to share my idealistic vision for this profession. Maybe I’m naïve – sometime in the future I might get so hot about someone’s column or story or a concern about my access to the teams I cover that I’ll force my frustration right down the throat of my audience. I started to on Monday before, mercifully, I stopped myself. If I ever get that close again, someone come tap me on the shoulder and tell me to get lost. Clearly, I’ll no longer be serving anyone’s interest in my own at that point. The beat itself is not the beat. The sportswriters of America themselves are not the story. Don’t forget that, and don’t let me, my colleagues at The Lantern or any other outlet forget it. read more

Strong goalkeeping not enough for Ohio State mens hockey

Senior forward Chad Niddery (19) is pinned to the boards during a game against Miami (Ohio) on Oct. 17 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU lost, 5-1, before falling again, 2-1, in Oxford, Ohio, on Oct. 18.Credit: Michael Griggs / For The LanternChristian Frey made 60 saves in one game and lost. That was the prevailing takeaway from the Ohio State men’s hockey team’s home-and-home series with No. 11 Miami (Ohio).After falling 5-1 in Columbus on Friday, the Buckeyes lost, 2-1, the following night despite their sophomore goaltender’s near-record-setting performance in Oxford, Ohio.“We have to look in the mirror and get better defensively,” OSU coach Steve Rohlik said. “I think that’s the biggest thing for us.”Frey came within six saves of setting a school record for most saves in a game on Saturday. OSU was outshot 62-20 in the game, the first time it had allowed more than 50 shots since Oct. 12, 2002, against Minnesota.“They shot the puck from everywhere, but I think they just outworked us in our zone,” Frey said. “We need to compete a lot harder.”The Buckeyes began Saturday’s game with the upper hand when RedHawk freshman defenseman Scott Dornbrock was ejected for interference at the 1:36 mark of the first period.Dorbrock’s game misconduct put OSU on a five-minute power play, during which the Buckeyes made it 1-0.Scoring opened late in the man advantage when OSU senior forward Tanner Fritz came barreling down the left-wing side, chucked a shot on net and junior forward Anthony Greco slapped in the rebound.“It was a tough play,” Miami junior goalie Jay Williams said. “I thought that as a whole, we responded really well … from that point on I think we took over the game.”The Buckeyes carried their lead into the first intermission, but saw it erased midway through the second period when Miami freshman defenseman Louie Belpedio fired a shot through traffic to tie the game. Frey said he never saw the shot.Less than two minutes later, RedHawks senior forward Alex Wideman scored the eventual game-winner on a wrap around.The RedHawks nearly added another later in second, but Miami senior forward Austin Czarnik’s goal was disallowed as the puck was frozen beneath Frey’s pad before it was pushed in.Despite catching a break, OSU couldn’t regain its first period momentum. The RedHawks outshot the Buckeyes, 25-5, in the second.“They just played more desperate than we did,” Rohlik said. “Once they started playing desperate and controlling the play, we were in retreat mode.”Miami preserved its 2-1 lead the rest of the way, attempting 62 shots to OSU’s 20.“It was tough, but I think we had a little bit better effort today,” Fritz said. “Maybe the shot clock didn’t show it but we did play hard, we competed.”Saturday’s one-goal game came on the heels of a 5-1 RedHawk win on Friday. But while OSU brought new energy on the road, it was without the services of senior defenseman Justin DaSilva and junior defenseman Sam Jardine.DaSilva and Jardine were issued game misconducts for illegal checks on Friday and served what Rohlik referred to as “team consequences” the following night.“We just made some decisions,” Rohlik said. “We don’t want to lead the country in penalty minutes so that’s going to end.”The ejections forced OSU to play with a shortened bench for the second half of Friday’s game.“We were playing behind and at that point having four (defenseman) doesn’t make it easy to get back in the game,” sophomore defenseman Drew Brevig said. “It would have been nice to have all six when you’re wanting to join the rush.”Brevig made it 3-1 early in the third period, but the RedHawks added two even-strength goals to put the game out of reach.Penalties were costly for the Buckeyes on Friday as the RedHawks went three-for-five on the power play.OSU sophomore goaltender Matt Tomkins finished Friday with 28 saves and the Buckeyes were outshot, 33-27.Loose Pucks• OSU freshman forward Kevin Miller made his collegiate debut on Saturday• OSU junior defenseman Blake Doerring made his Buckeye debut on Saturday read more

Lukaku Pogba Martial and Lingard wont start season – Ian Wright

first_imgFootball pundit Ian Wright has warned that Manchester United boss Jose Mourinho’s thoughts about looking towards October could be threatening, stating that Manchester City – who’ve already won this season’s Community Shield appears ready to pick up where they stopped.While speaking at Sky Sports The Debate, Wright said:“You are expecting Man United to do a lot more business and they’ve made no secret of the fact they were after centre-halves. They chased down Harry Maguire and were interested in Toby Alderweireld and you’d have though they probably might have got one of those two. But he is saying about judging in November; I think when you look at Manchester City’s start, they look really invigorated already.Jose Mourinho is sold on Lampard succeeding ar Chelsea Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho wanted to give his two cents on Frank Lampard’s odds as the new Chelsea FC manager, he thinks he will succeed.There really…“If you look at the next six games after the Arsenal game, by October, they could literally win all of those games. Man United are going to have to have some players who are going to be rested and they are going to need to start really quickly. I think Lukaku probably won’t start the season, Anthony Martial and Paul Pogba probably won’t start the season, Lingard probably won’t start the season. It’s going to be an interesting start for them.He continued: “Even with Pogba winning the World Cup, the comments he made…to poo-poo someone who has won the World Cup, you want to try and give him as much confidence, as much leeway to come and inspire your team to kick on like that, you just wonder why he does that. I’ve got a lot of time for Jose but he says things and I just wonder why would you say that?”last_img read more

When green turns toxic Norwegians study Electric Vehicle life cycle

first_img Citation: When green turns toxic: Norwegians study Electric Vehicle life cycle (2012, October 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-10-green-toxic-norwegians-electric-vehicle.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Normalized impacts of vehicle production. Results for each impact category have been normalized to the largest total impact. Global warming (GWP), terrestrial acidification (TAP), particulate matter formation (PMFP), photochemical oxidation formation (POFP), human toxicity (HTP), freshwater eco-toxicity (FETP), terrestrial eco-toxicity (TETP), freshwater eutrophication (FEP), mineral resource depletion (MDP), fossil resource depletion (FDP), internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV), electric vehicle (EV), lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4), lithium nickel cobalt manganese (LiNCM), coal (C), natural gas (NG), European electricity mix (Euro). Credit: (c) Journal of Industrial Ecology, DOI: 10.1111/j.1530-9290.2012.00532.x Explore further The “supply chain” part of the statement is key to the focus of their research. The electric car has been promoted heavily as a car for the future but quick takes on EVs as environmental vehicles of choice should be replaced with longer and careful looks, even oversight, at what occurs during the entire cradle-to-gate life cycle of a car’s production, use, and dismantling.Light-duty vehicles account for approximately 10 percent of global energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and policy makers have braced themselves for what that means in climate change and air quality. In the Norwegian study, the authors looked at conventional and electric vehicles to see how all phases, from production to use to dismantling, affect the environment. They concluded that, “Although EVs are an important technological breakthrough with substantial potential environmental benefits, these cannot be harnessed everywhere and in every condition. Our results clearly indicate that it is counterproductive to promote EVs in areas where electricity is primarily produced from lignite, coal, or even heavy oil combustion.”The authors warned that the “elimination of tailpipe emissions at the expense of increased emissions in the vehicle and electricity production chains” carries risks for policy makers and stakeholders. The authors support serious attention to “life cycle” thinking. Their research was partly funded by the Norwegian Research Council under the E-Car ProjectEarlier this year, reports of a study of vehicle types in China concluded that electric cars have an overall impact on pollution that could be more harmful to health than conventional vehicles. The researchers in that study examined pollution in 34 Chinese cities and they found that the electricity generated by power stations to drive electric vehicles led to more fine particle emissions than petrol-powered transport. They analyzed five vehicle types—gasoline and diesel cars, diesel buses, e-bikes and e-cars. (Phys.org)—Questioning thoughts arise from a bracing study from Norway. The electric car might be a trade-in of an old set of pollution problems for a new set. Thanks but no thanks to a misguided cadre selling on the green revolution. Electric cars will eventually be one more pollutant source to campaign over. The study, “Comparative Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Conventional and Electric Vehicles,” appears in the Journal of Industrial Ecology. Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology declared in the study that “EVs exhibit the potential for significant increases in human toxicity, freshwater eco-toxicity, freshwater eutrophication, and metal depletion impacts, largely emanating from the vehicle supply chain.” China’s pollution related to E-cars may be more harmful than gasoline cars, researchers find More information: Comparative Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Conventional and Electric Vehicles, Troy R. Hawkins, Bhawna Singh, Guillaume Majeau-Bettez, Anders Hammer Strømman, Journal of Industrial Ecology, Article first published online: 4 OCT 2012. DOI: 10.1111/j.1530-9290.2012.00532.xAbstractElectric vehicles (EVs) coupled with low-carbon electricity sources offer the potential for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and exposure to tailpipe emissions from personal transportation. In considering these benefits, it is important to address concerns of problem-shifting. In addition, while many studies have focused on the use phase in comparing transportation options, vehicle production is also significant when comparing conventional and EVs. We develop and provide a transparent life cycle inventory of conventional and electric vehicles and apply our inventory to assess conventional and EVs over a range of impact categories. We find that EVs powered by the present European electricity mix offer a 10% to 24% decrease in global warming potential (GWP) relative to conventional diesel or gasoline vehicles assuming lifetimes of 150,000 km. However, EVs exhibit the potential for significant increases in human toxicity, freshwater eco-toxicity, freshwater eutrophication, and metal depletion impacts, largely emanating from the vehicle supply chain. Results are sensitive to assumptions regarding electricity source, use phase energy consumption, vehicle lifetime, and battery replacement schedules. Because production impacts are more significant for EVs than conventional vehicles, assuming a vehicle lifetime of 200,000 km exaggerates the GWP benefits of EVs to 27% to 29% relative to gasoline vehicles or 17% to 20% relative to diesel. An assumption of 100,000 km decreases the benefit of EVs to 9% to 14% with respect to gasoline vehicles and results in impacts indistinguishable from those of a diesel vehicle. Improving the environmental profile of EVs requires engagement around reducing vehicle production supply chain impacts and promoting clean electricity sources in decision making regarding electricity infrastructure. © 2012 Phys.orglast_img read more