The Rolls-Royce share price: here’s what I’d do right now

first_imgThe Rolls-Royce share price: here’s what I’d do right now Image source: Getty Images Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Rupert Hargreaves has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. See all posts by Rupert Hargreavescenter_img “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Rupert Hargreaves | Friday, 5th February, 2021 | More on: RR Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Enter Your Email Address Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares As a value investor, I’m always on the lookout for companies that have seen their share prices fall dramatically as this can often indicate an undervalued business.However, it doesn’t guarantee it. That’s why the Rolls-Royce (LSE: RR) share price has recently appeared on my radar. Shares in the group have fallen around 50% over the past 12 months. And while the stock has recently recovered some of these losses, it continues to trade significantly below its pre-pandemic level. 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Therefore, I’ve been reviewing the business to see if it offers value at current levels. What’s behind the Rolls-Royce share price decline?I think it’s fair to say that last year was one of the worst periods in the engineer’s storied history. As the pandemic rippled around the world, Rolls’ sales and profits evaporated. This caused severe liquidity issues across the group. Management had to negotiate an emergency fundraising to avoid a complete collapse. But now, the business seems to be through the worst of it. In its 26 January trading update, the company told the market: “Trading in December was broadly in line with expectations across all business units.” It went on to add: “Full-year 2020 group free cash outflow was in line with previous guidance, and in-year cash cost savings of more than £1bn were achieved from our mitigating actions.“Management also seems to have put Rolls’ funding issues behind the business. Year-end liquidity was approximately £9bn, at the “upper end of the previously guided range,” according to the update.However, despite these positive updates, the group warned its recovery in 2021 might be slower than expected. I think this update was highly positive, although the market didn’t seem to agree. The Rolls-Royce share price dropped 10% on the day of the announcement.Challenges ahead It would appear investors are concerned about the organisation’s recovery prospects. That makes sense. If the engineering group continues to struggle, it may suffer further liquidity issues in future.What’s more, cutting costs isn’t a sustainable long-term strategy. Rolls relies on its technological know-how to attract customers. It needs to invest to keep developing new technologies. Cutting costs to the bone may mean it can’t invest enough, which would have a detrimental impact on its reputation. Customers may avoid the business for good in this worst-case scenario. So, it seems it isn’t out of the woods just yet. It could be sometime before the group returns to growth, and this lack of growth may weigh on the Rolls-Royce share price. However, it seems as if the firm has put the worst behind it. A big positive, in my view. As such, I’d buy a limited position in the stock for my ISA as a recovery play. Rolls clearly faces some significant risks as we advance but, on the other hand, a quick economic recovery could be hugely positive for the shares. last_img read more

Altice Completes Its Takeover of Cablevision

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York European-based media mega-giant Altice N.V. announced Tuesday that it has completed its purchase of Bethpage-based Cablevision Systems Corp., which owns Newsday, amNewYork and News 12, for $17.7 billion.Altice made its initial offer to acquire the company on Sept. 16, 2015, estimating that the sale would go through by the second quarter of this year after getting the required regulatory approval. In May, the Federal Communications Commission ruled that the deal “serves the public interest.” Last week the New York State Public Service commission approved the purchase with conditions that it estimated could provide $243 million in benefits to New York consumers.By combining Cablevision’s 3.1 million customers in the tri-state region and the nearly 1.5 million customers of Suddenlink Communications, the St. Louis, Missouri-based company that Altice acquired last December for $9.1 billion, Altice USA becomes the fourth largest cable operator in the U.S.Billionaire tycoon Patrick Drahi, who founded Altice in 2002, said the Cablevision acquisition was “a crucial step” to the company’s growth.“We are very excited about our U.S. business and the opportunities we see in this market,” Drahi said in a statement. “We will accelerate network investments and bring innovative products and services to U.S. customers by leveraging our global operational expertise, scale and resources.”He had kind words to say about Cablevision’s now former owners, the Dolans.“I wish to also thank the Dolan family for entrusting us with their life’s work at Cablevision, where they have developed under their pioneering stewardship one of America’s pre-eminent cable operations with best-in-class management talent.”Wait a minute: Considering on online MBA? There’s many benefits to pursuing a master’s in business administration online rather than the traditional in-class settingDrahi’s favorable sentiments about Cablevision’s employees were echoed by Dexter Goei, president of Altice N.V., and chairman and chief executive officer of Altice USA.“Our very talented employees have great energy and enthusiasm,” Goei said in a statement, “and we are confident that altogether we will help to build Altice USA to the benefit of our customers and the local communities that we serve.”Naming its new executive leadership team, Altice USA said that Patrick Dolan would remain head of News 12 Networks.MORE: There’s nothing like summer on Long Island. Here’s a list of this year’s summer fairs and festivals“To meet our customers’ content and information needs, the company through News 12 also offers hyper-local news and programming created specifically for the communities we serve,” said the new company in its press release.There was no comment about the fate of Newsday, despite requests.The sale doesn’t include Madison Square Garden Co., which under the umbrella of MSG Sports, owns the New York Knicks, New York Rangers and New York Liberty.last_img read more

Racing Action

first_imgAyr plays host to the last Grand National of the season this afternoon – the Scottish National.The Nicky Henderson-trained Premier Bond is likely to go off as favourite when the grade three race goes to post at five-to-four.Here at home there’s an eight-race all flat card at Limerick from a quarter-past-one.last_img

Nelson Ford Shootout Novice Tournament fills Nelson with hockey fans

first_imgIf parking was a problem this weekend in the City of Nelson, blame organizers of the Nelson Ford Shootout.But remember, too many visitors to Nelson is a good thing.Once again the Nelson Ford Shootout Novice Tournament proved to be another success as more than 500 players and parents flocked to the Heritage City to compete in the annual event.Fifteen teams, including the Nelson Senior Leafs, Senior Rockets and Junior Nitros from Nelson Minor Hockey, participated in the tournament.There were two divisions, junior and senior novice. Each team played three games at the Nelson and District Community Complex or Civic Centre Arena.Teams entered from Rossland/Trail, Beaver Valley, Castlegar, Spokane and Tri-Cities.last_img

Valley West Hawks sweep Ice as Major Midget opens season

first_imgTy Westgard added five assists for the Hawks.Coy Prevost of Kimberley scored the lone goal for Kootenay.Saturday, Kootenay held period leads of 2-1 and 4-3 before Valley West scored four times in the third period to complete the comeback.Seven different players scored for the Hawks.Prevost, Aigne McGready-Bruce of Nelson, Trevor Van Steinburg of Cranbrook and Spencer McLean of Montrose scored for the Ice.Kootenay travels to Richmond Saturday to face the Vancouver Northeast Giants in a two-game weekend series.The weekend series was the first taste of Major Midget hockey for new Kootenay coach Rob Wright.Wright replaced Mario DiBella last week after the former skipper resigned due to work commitments. Valley West Hawks scored early and often en route to a 9-1 shellacking of the Kootenay Ice in B.C. Hockey Major Midget League action Sunday at the NDCC Arena.The win came on the heels of a come-from-behind 7-4 victory by Valley West Hawks Saturday afternoon over the Ice in Nelson.The games marked the opening of the BCMMHL season.Jordan Funk, with his first of two on the night, scored in the first minute to begin the rout, poking a rebound past Ice netminder Jason Mailhiot of Trail.Luke Gingras scored twice with singles going to Paul Smith, Davis Koch, Mitch Newsome and captain Paul Savage.last_img read more

Dinolava Theory Back in Eruption

first_imgMeteor impact or volcanic eruption?  Science Now reports that the volcano theory of dinosaur extinction has rejuvenated, challenging the long popularity of the Chicxulub impact hypothesis.    Notwithstanding all the dramatic animations on science documentaries of a cataclysmic meteor wiping out the dinosaurs, the article by Carolyn Gramling states that “Scientists have long wrangled over the cause of the extinctions….”  A new French study of magnetic alignments of lavas in the Deccan Traps of India, some of the biggest lava fields in the world, suggests that the cataclysmic eruptions occurred over a much shorter time period than previously believed – 30,000 years instead of millions – short enough, they claim, to affect worldwide climate.  Some of the older eruptions may have happened even more rapidly because there is no evidence of weathering between successive layers.    A Dutch proponent of the impact scenario is not convinced, however.  He said we don’t know enough about behavior and variability of the Earth’s magnetic field to make strong arguments based on magnetic alignments in rocks.  Gramling says, “He also questions whether any known geophysical mechanism could have spewed out so much lava in such a short time.”Readers, take note: the Science Channel and all the documentaries present their scenarios as fact, and try to make them seem so certain that all scientists agree.  The dating of events, especially, is rarely if ever questioned.  Here, one side is claiming that the old dates of the Deccan Traps are wrong; the other side is questioning whether we can tell anything from magnetic alignments (even though they are commonly used to convince the viewing public of the precision of dating methods).  Since, in the above article, neither theory overlaps the other (see 10/01/2003 entry), each must independently make its case.  Do you begin to get the idea that neither side knows what on earth they are talking about?  Good.  Your eyes are open.    We need to realize how little we can know about prehistory by empirical methods (cf. 11/05/2003)  We need to acknowledge to what extent the data are subject to being molded to human interpretations and presuppositions.  Data exist in the present, not the past (visualize this).  Scientists build models to incorporate the present observations, but short of a time machine or eyewitnesses (02/17/2003 commentary), the past is forever out of reach, and getting more so all the time.  This is not to overlook that some models are more plausible than others (cf. 04/22/2004).  But while seemingly plausible now, today’s leading model can be (and often is) overturned with the next finding.  The Chicxulub story attained such a consensus in recent years as to be nearly enshrined as The Official Story of the Death of the Dinosaurs, but now look; it’s got major problems (04/10/2003, 09/25/2003, 11/25/2003).  Reporters, TV producers and writers of children’s books have not, for the most part, caught up with this development (see 05/13/2004 example), but it is another case of a popular model becoming a has-been.  Such turnarounds litter the history of science.  Writing with an air of certainty about prehistory, therefore, mars otherwise good books like The Privileged Planet (e.g., pp. 22ff) that speak of events in the unobservable past, including magnetic field signatures, as if recorded on steadily-moving tape to be just read off by the unbiased eyes of scientists.  The Dutch critic here reminds us that we know too little about planetary magnetic fields to speak so confidently.  That goes for other dating methods as well.  Discerning minds do well not to attribute infallibility to mortals.As we have pointed out before (10/06/2004 commentary), it is much safer to play conservative and not extrapolate observed measurements recklessly into the past.  It is easier to set upper limits on time than lower limits.  For example, estimating the lifetime of a comet into the past by a few more orbits than have been observed is reasonable, but claiming it came into existence a million years ago extends the observations far beyond human experience.  The former stretches observed behavior a little way back; the latter extrapolates a few data points into unknown territory by many orders of magnitude.  Who knows what perturbations might have changed the orbit before we observed it?  It’s more justifiable to project how long the comet might last given its present rate of mass loss (an upper limit), than to claim it has had to exist for at least umpty million years (a lower limit).  In the current case, the lack of weathering between layers would seem to place an upper limit to the amount of time that must have transpired during the sequence of eruptions.  An upper limit is, of course, a limit; the actual age could have been much lower.  For more examples, see 05/01/2004 story about tufa formations, and the 05/10/2004 article about caves.The admission about whether any known geophysical mechanism could have spewed out so much lava in such a short time is revealing.  Whatever happened to uniformitarianism?  (Notice: it’s gone; catastrophism rules—see 11/04/2003 and 05/22/2003.)  But don’t let these guys puzzle about that problem only here at home.  Have them tell us why big eruptions should be happening right now on Io (05/04/2004), Triton (06/05/2003), Titan (06/09/2005) and Enceladus (07/29/2005) after billions of years, each of them smaller than the Earth (and therefore possessing less gravitational heat), or why comets should still be erupting after so many trips around the sun (03/27/2003).  It’s not that the moyboys* can’t concoct a good story, but to do so, they must keep inserting ad hoc assumptions to keep processes going that would otherwise fizzle out in far less time.  In today’s case, we see two sides (both naturalistic and evolutionary) undermining the credibility of each other’s tale.  The proper lesson is that neither idea can be trusted, and neither side knows what happened, because they weren’t there.*A new word meaning scientists and reporters who toss around the terms millions of years, billions of years with reckless abandon.    The upshot is that, despite all the appearance of scientific rigor, the measurements and jargon, neither story explains the extinction of the dinosaurs, or why some organisms carried on through the catastrophe as if nothing happened (11/08/2004).  A corollary is that any sufficiently advanced model resting on uncertain premises is indistinguishable from a novel.  After all, a good novel usually takes place in the real world and deals with observable, tangible things.  Some novels even describe historical personages and places in exquisite detail (cf. the detailed measurements of magnetic field orientations in present-day rocks).  It does not follow that the events described ever happened, or even if they did, that they happened when the believer claims they happened, or in the way they happened, or that nothing else happened that might bear on what happened.  Another corollary is that a newer model is not necessarily better.  A fancier mansion built on the same shifting sand has the same underlying vulnerability (see 05/13/2004).  It is a specious response, therefore, to retort, “Well, then, what is your model?”  Some choose not to build on the sand, but on the rock.(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Google claims Otto founder and Uber colluded far before acquisition

first_imgBreak the Mold with Real-World Logistics AI and… David Curry Related Posts 5 Ways IoT can Help to Reduce Automatic Vehicle… IT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A…center_img For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… Tags:#Alphabet#Anthony Levandowski#autonomous cars#California#driverless#Google#Otto#Self-Driving#Travis Kalanick#Uber#Waymo Google is hoping to strengthen its lawsuit against Uber with a detailed timeline of the friendship between Uber’s CEO Travis Kalanick and ex-Googler, now head of Uber’s self-driving division, Anthony Levandowski.Levandowski is at the center of the lawsuit, as Google alleges he stole trade secrets from the company and sold them to Uber, through the sale of Otto for $680 million.See Also: Google paces pack in autonomous car race, says California regulatorThe timeline shows Levandowski forming Otto in February 2016 and at the same time becoming an advisor at Uber’s self-driving division, on the face of it a contradictory move for both parties. Before that, Google says that Levandowski had met with key players at Uber, including vice president of maps, Brian McClendon and Kalanick.Google then says Kalanick offered to purchase Otto in the spring of 2016, four months before the eventual sale and only a few weeks after the startup came out of stealth.What was the timeframe?In Google’s eyes, Levandowski had been colluding with Uber far before the acquisition, and may have started before he left Mountain View. It would explain the alleged theft of proprietary data by Levandowski, which supposedly happened on December 2016.Both Uber and Levandowski have declined to comment.The accusations from Google could have huge effects on Uber’s self-driving program, if the judge rules in the search giant’s favor. Even with California’s rather lax trade secrets law, it would still be able to seek an injunction, damages, and lawyer’s fees. From there, as Daniel Compton points out, Google could call on the SEC to look into the case.The lawsuit adds to the rather dismal past few weeks for Uber, which has been hit hard by the press again and again for a multitude of failings.last_img read more

10 months agoLiverpool ace Salah: My father sacrificed so much for me

first_imgLiverpool ace Salah: My father sacrificed so much for meby Chris Beattie10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool ace Mohamed Salah has paid tribute to his father for the success he has enjoyed over the last 18 months.Salah says his father paid a high price for him, and he is very grateful.He told GQ: “I would complain that I didn’t want to travel [the four hours] to training.”But he stood by me and told me that all great players go through this. “The price for him was very high, and I’ll never forget the role he played in my career.” About the authorChris BeattieShare the loveHave your saylast_img

Video: Colin Cowherd Says Alabama Is The “Wal-Mart Of College Football”

first_imgColin Cowherd discussing something on his show.YouTube/Colin CowherdColin Cowherd has moved on from his weekly trolling of Iowa to find a new target. This week, Cowherd is apparently taking a few shots at Alabama. The FOX Sports radio host isn’t a fan of how “bland” the program has been during the Nick Saban era.Cowherd called Alabama the “Wal-Mart of college football” when discussing the team’s lack of quarterback success at the next level. He also doesn’t think that Saban’s excessive use of Derrick Henry will benefit the running back in the future.Where @ColinCowherd perfectly compares Alabama to Walmart. #RollbackTide #HerdHere https://t.co/mwfBwTGISE— Herd w/Colin Cowherd (@TheHerd) December 15, 2015Obviously, it’s hard to argue with how much success Saban’s had in Tuscaloosa. We imagine that he doesn’t really care whether he’s winning with enough style points.last_img read more