Episcopalians remember, reflect, pray for Notre Dame Cathedral

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Smoke rises around the altar in front of the cross inside Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris as a fire continues to burn, April 16, 2019. Photo: Philippe Wojazer/REUTERS[Episcopal News Service] While the world watched in stunned disbelief as Notre Dame Cathedral went up in flames April 15, many people, including Episcopalians, took to social media to post photos of their visits to the iconic church and offer prayers for the people of Paris.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry joined with the Very Rev. Lucinda Laird, dean of the American Cathedral in Paris, and Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe Bishop in Charge Mark D.W. Edington, to offer “our sincere condolences and our readiness to offer any hospitality that would be of help to the community and congregation of Notre Dame in this most holy season of the faith we share.”The three said that members of the Episcopal cathedral – located about three miles up the Seine from Notre Dame – “send our prayers in this week that ends in what we know to be the sure and certain promise of resurrection for the future life and restoration of this monument of Christian faith.”Notre Dame, the most famous of the world’s medieval Gothic cathedrals, was begun in 1163 on the Île de la Cité in the Seine and was considered finished in 1350. It rose on the site of two earlier churches. Prior to those churches, the site held a Gallo-Roman temple dedicated to Jupiter. Some of the Roman ruin can still be seen below the cathedral. About 13 million people visit the Roman Catholic cathedral each year.In New York, members of the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine must have watched news broadcasts from Paris with a special sympathy. A fire in the cathedral’s crypt broke out a day earlier, on the morning of April 14, Palm Sunday, sending smoke into the 124-foot-high stone nave and forcing the evacuation of about 100 people. The fire began after the 9 a.m. service had ended. The 11 a.m. service was moved outside, as was the Sunday soup kitchen.The Rt. Rev. Clifton Daniel, dean of the cathedral, told Episcopal News Service that the fire started in an art storage room and was contained to that space. About three-quarters of the art was saved, but the fire destroyed a valuable icon and a 16th-century chair, as well as some prints, drawings and carvings, he said. He credited the New York Fire Department’s prompt response for keeping the damage to far less than it could have been.The cathedral was open on April 15, but because of ongoing cleanup, public tours were cancelled, as were the three services scheduled for Holy Monday (Eucharist plus Morning and Evening Prayer).“My first thought, even though I wasn’t here, was oh, God, it’s just like the fire in 2001 here at the cathedral,” said Daniel, recalling his reaction to hearing about the Notre Dame disaster. (Daniel first came to the cathedral in March 2017 as interim dean.)It was a week before Christmas Eve in 2001 when the six-alarm fire burned through the timbered roof trusses, which caved in, destroying the north transept, he said. The 2001 fire also severely damaged the Great Organ and two of the cathedral’s Life of Christ Barberini tapestries. Sections of the cathedral were closed until 2008 for cleaning and restoration.“My second thought was oh, the trauma, the trauma. It will take years to recover from the trauma. You will recover, but it will take time,” Daniel said. “And then I thought, those poor people, all that suffering, all that history, all that hope. It’s going to be a tough time.”Daniel said some people asked him if the two fires this week were a sign. He told them they showed “we’re in a season of dying and rising.”Flames may have destroyed art at St. John the Divine and a large part of Notre Dame, “but, you know what, we rise again,” he said, noting that the 2001 fire left the cathedral “a little bit scarred” but still at work among the people of New York.“I feel confident that Notre Dame will be repaired, restored, renewed and will go on about its mission,” Daniel said, adding that along with the hard work that will be required in the coming years comes “an opportunity for renewal and strength to move ahead.”At Washington National Cathedral, a place that has known the impact of disaster since an August 2011 magnitude 5.8 earthquake caused tens of millions of dollars of damage, Dean Randy Hollerith expressed solidarity with another cathedral in what he called “a small sisterhood of globally recognizable Gothic cathedrals.”Evensong at the cathedral on April 15 included a prayer for Notre Dame and a copy of the prayer was placed in the church’s St. John’s Chapel for those who wanted to light a candle for the church community in Paris.“Our hearts are breaking for their loss, but we know that this great cathedral has touched and inspired millions of people around the world, and that impact can never be destroyed,” Hollerith said.The Rev. Broderick Greer, canon precentor at St. John’s Cathedral in Denver, wrote a prayer for Notre Dame, which the cathedral offered on its Facebook page “from one cathedral to another.”The Rev. Vicki Geer McGrath was among the many Episcopalians who posted their prayers and reflections on Facebook. She told parishioners at All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Millington, New Jersey, where she is the rector, that buildings do not make a church; however, “a place that is built to hold and inspire the faith and prayers of believers, and to contain the hopes and aspirations of all men and women, becomes a vessel and vehicle of holiness, no matter how simple or how grand.”McGrath wrote that she was moved by people – “their faith and hope on very public display” – who gathered in the streets of Paris, praying and singing hymns as they watched Notre Dame burn.Acknowledging the increasing secularization of Europe and the United States, she suggested that it is time for all Christians “to pray earnestly and daily for the renewal of our faith in Christ and for new life for the church” and “each one of us will be inspired and directed to be God’s agents in a new flowering of faith and life in Christ.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 16, 2019 Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopalians remember, reflect, pray for Notre Dame Cathedral Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

Epiphany 2021: Presiding Bishop issues a call to prayer for…

first_imgEpiphany 2021: A Call to Prayer for our Nation from Presiding Bishop Curry Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Curate Diocese of Nebraska Back to Press Releases Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Church Office of Public AffairsPosted Jan 6, 2021 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL [January 6, 2021] On this day of the Feast of the Epiphany, Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry invites Episcopalians and people of faith to turn and pray on behalf of our nation.Watch the video of the Presiding Bishop’s statement here.A transcript of the statement follows:Today is January the 6th, 2021. It is the Feast of the Epiphany. And on this particular day at this particular moment, even as our nation’s capital is being endangered and assaulted, we pray that the Lord Jesus Christ, we pray that God, in his Way of Love, might prevail in all of our hearts.The events at our Capitol today are deeply disturbing. We believe the actions of armed protesters represent a coup attempt. We are a democracy, with long-standing institutional norms that must be honored, foremost among them, following the processes laid out in the Constitution and Federal statute to facilitate the peaceful and orderly transition of power.Today’s protesters pushed through police barricades and forced their way into Congressional chambers, and the Capitol building are now threatened, and threatening the safety of lawmakers, their staff, and others who work in the Capitol complex.  This threatens the integrity of our democracy. The national security of our nation, the continuity of government, and the lives and safety of our legislators, their staffs, law enforcement, and all who work in the Capitol.I, therefore, ask you now to join me in prayer for our nation, praying first from the prayers that accompany Morning Prayer:Save your people, Lord, and bless your inheritance;Govern and uphold us now and always.Day by day we bless you;We praise your name forever.Lord, keep us from sin today;Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy. Lord, show us your love and mercy;For we put our trust in you. In you, Lord, is our hope;And we shall never hope in vain.-Morning Prayer II, Book of Common Prayer, p. 98Let us pray:Eternal God, in whose perfect kingdom no sword is drawn but the sword of righteousness, no strength known but the strength of love: So mightily spread abroad your Spirit, that all peoples may be gathered together under the banner of the Prince of Peace, as children of one God and Creator of us all; to whom be dominion and glory, now and forever.For Peace, Book of Common Prayer, p. 815Oh God, you made us in your own image and redeemed us through Jesus your son. Look now with compassion on the entire human family; and particularly this part of the family, in the United States, and those in our nation’s capital; take away the arrogance and hatred which infect our hearts; break down the walls that separate us; unite us in bonds of love; and work through our struggle and confusion to accomplish your purposes on earth; that, in your good time, all nations and races may serve you in harmony around your heavenly throne; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.For the Human Family, Book of Common Prayer, p. 815On this day and at this moment, we pray for our nation. We ask God to heal us, to show us the way to healing, to show us the way to be one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.Now, as our Savior Christ has taught us, we are bold to say,Our Father who art in heaven,hallowed be thy Name,thy kingdom come,thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.Give us this day our daily breadAnd forgive us our trespasses,as we forgive those who trespass against us.And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil,For thine is the kingdom,and the power and the glory,forever and ever.Amen.And now, may the peace of God which passeth all understanding keep your hearts and minds in the knowledge and love of God and of his Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.The blessing of God Almighty the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit be on you and on this nation and on the entire human family and all of creation this moment and forevermore.Amen.[7 de enero de 2021] En este día de la Fiesta de la Epifanía, el obispo primado de la Iglesia Episcopal, Michael Curry, invita a los episcopales y a personas de todas las religiones a volverse [a Dios] y orar por nuestra nación.Pueden ver el video con la declaración del Obispo Primado aquí.A continuación se encuentra una transcripción de su mensaje:Hoy es 6 de enero de 2021. Es la Fiesta de la Epifanía. Y en este día en particular, en este momento en particular, incluso mientras la capital de nuestra nación está en peligro y es atacada, oramos para que el Señor Jesucristo, oramos para que Dios, en su Camino de Amor, prevalezca en todos nuestros corazones.Los sucesos ocurridos hoy en nuestro Capitolio son profundamente inquietantes. Creemos que las acciones de los manifestantes armados representan un intento de golpe de Estado. Somos una democracia, con normas institucionales de larga data que deben ser respetadas, siendo la principal de ellas seguir los procesos establecidos en la Constitución y el estatuto federal para facilitar la transición pacífica y ordenada del poder.Los manifestantes de hoy se abrieron paso a través de las barricadas policiales y entraron a la fuerza en las cámaras del Congreso, y el edificio del Capitolio ahora está amenazado así como la seguridad de los legisladores, su personal y otras personas que trabajan en el complejo del Capitolio. Esto atenta contra la integridad de nuestra democracia, la seguridad nacional, la continuidad del gobierno y la vida y seguridad de nuestros legisladores, su personal, las fuerzas del orden y todos los que trabajan en el Capitolio.Por tanto, les pido ahora que se unan a mí para orar por nuestra nación, rezando primero una de las plegarias que aparecen en la Oración Matutina:Señor, salva a tu pueblo y bendice a tu heredad;Gobiérnalos y susténtalos para siempre. De día en día te bendecimos; Alabamos tu nombre perpetuamente. Guárdanos, Señor, sin pecado en este día;Ten piedad de nosotros, Señor, ten piedad. Señor, muéstranos tu amor y misericordia;Porque sólo en ti confiamos. En ti, Señor, está nuestra esperanza;Que nuestra esperanza nunca sea en vano.     – Oración Matutina, Libro de Oración Común, p. 61Oremos:Eterno Dios, en cuyo reino perfecto no se esgrime más espada que la de la justiciar, ni se conoce otra fuerza que la del amor: Derrama poderosamente tu Espíritu sobre todos los pueblos, a fin de que sean reunidos bajo el estandarte del Príncipe de Paz, como hijos de un solo Padre; a quien sea el dominio y la gloria, por los siglos de los siglos.     – Por la Paz, Libro de Oración Común, p. 705Oh Dios, tú nos hiciste a tu propia imagen, y nos redimiste por Jesús tu Hijo: mira en tu compasión a toda la familia humana; y en particular esta parte de la familia, en Estados Unidos, y los que se encuentran en la capital de nuestra nación; quita el odio y la arrogancia que nos corrompen el corazón; derrumba las barreras que nos separan; únenos en vínculos de amor y actúa a través de nuestra lucha y confusión a fin de cumplir tus propósitos en la tierra; para que, a su debido tiempo, todas las naciones y razas te sirvan en armonía alrededor de tu trono celestial; por Jesucristo nuestro Señor. Amén.     – Por la familia humana, Libro de Oración Común, p. 705En este día y en este momento, oramos por nuestra nación. Le pedimos a Dios que nos restaure, para mostrarnos el camino de la restauración, para mostrarnos la manera de llegar a ser una nación sujeta a [la voluntad de] Dios, indivisible, con libertad y justicia para todos.Ahora, como nuestro Salvador Cristo nos ha enseñado, nos atrevemos a decir:Padre nuestro que estás en el cielo,santificado sea tu Nombre,venga tu reino,Hágase tu voluntad, en la tierra como en el cielo.Danos hoy nuestro pan de cada díaPerdona nuestras ofensas,Como también nosotros perdonamos a los que nos ofenden.Y no nos dejes caer en tentación, mas líbranos del mal.Porque tuyo es el reino,y el poder y la gloria,ahora y por siempre.Amén.Y ahora, que la paz de Dios que excede a todo entendimiento guarde sus corazones y mentes en el conocimiento y amor de Dios y de su Hijo Jesucristo, nuestro Señor.La bendición de Dios todopoderoso, el Padre, el Hijo y el Espíritu Santo, sea con ustedes y con esta nación y con toda la familia humana y con toda la creación, ahora y por siempre.Amén. Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more

Hayat TV allowed to resume broadcasting

first_img Follow the news on Turkey News Receive email alerts Organisation Turkey’s never-ending judicial persecution of former newspaper editor August 13, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Hayat TV allowed to resume broadcasting Human rights groups warns European leaders before Turkey summit April 2, 2021 Find out more April 2, 2021 Find out more TurkeyEurope – Central Asia to go furthercenter_img April 28, 2021 Find out more TurkeyEurope – Central Asia News News Journalists threatened with imprisonment under Turkey’s terrorism law News Help by sharing this information RSF_en The Turkish television station Hayat TV was allowed to resume broadcasting on 6 August after convincing the High Council for Turkish Broadcasting (RTUK), the state satellite company Turksat and the interior and transport ministries that it had never cooperated with Roj TV, a Kurdish station based in Germany which the Turkish authorities regard as an outlet of the banned PKK._______________________________________________________________21.07.2008- TV station’s broadcasts suspended withoutwarningReporters Without Borders condemns the indefinite suspension of Hayat TV’s broadcasts since 16 July at the behest of the High Council for Turkish Broadcasting (RTUK) for allegedly providing film of the Kurdish New Year celebrations to Roj TV, a station based in Germany which the Turkish authorities regard as an outlet of the banned Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK).In reality, the footage was provided by the Kurdish news agency DIHA.“Hayat TV’s suspension without any warning is indicative of the pressure which the Turkish authorities put on certain news media,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The grounds given by the RTUK was Hayat TV’s alleged cooperation with Roj TV when in fact the Turkish New Year footage was obtained from elsewhere. Hayat TV’s suspension must be lifted at once.”Insisting that he has never provided any footage to Roj TV, Hayat TV chief Aydin Cubukçu said he would do everything necessary to be able to resume broadcasting and would seek compensation from the RTUK and the state-owned TV satellite operator Türksat.Cubukçu claimed that, at the behest of the RTUK, Türksat chief executive Özkan Dalbay wrote in a 16 July letter to Turkovizyon, a company contracts Türksat services for a number of Turkish TV stations: “To avoid our disconnecting all of the Turkovizyon platform’s broadcasts, we ask you to terminate Hayat TV’s broadcasts and to henceforth pay more attention to the content of the stations you host.”Hayat TV had been broadcasting since 3 December 2007. Its content is targeted at Turkish workers.last_img read more

Two journalists given prison sentences a week before World Press Freedom Day

first_img CameroonAfrica News News Organisation News May 19, 2021 Find out more April 23, 2021 Find out more CameroonAfrica Follow the news on Cameroon Two journalists given prison sentences a week before World Press Freedom DayReporters Without Borders expressed concern at the continuing practice of jailing journalists in Cameroon for press offences, as a court sentenced two journalists to five months in jail and a fine of five million francs CFA (7,620 euros) for defamation.”Exposing serious abuses in an article does not constitute a crime, even in Cameroon,” the worldwide press freedom organisation said.Editor of the newspaper, L’œil du Sahel, Guibaï Gatama and his journalist colleague Abdoulaye Oumaté were sentenced in their absence by a court in Maroua on 26 April 2005. They had exposed “abuses and extortion practised on the people by the security forces” in an article that appeared in January 2005 headlined Fotokol: the gendarmes block the road. Neither journalist attended court, for fear of arrest, and one of them is believed to have fled the country.In his article, Abdoulaye Oumaté condemned “the mafia gendarmes of the Fotokol brigade, who on the pretext of fighting ‘road-block gangs” roam the region robbing citizens.” A defamation complaint was subsequently lodged by the captain of the brigade.Reporters Without Borders said it also regretted that the court administration was not doing more to try to recover the court file which had mysteriously disappeared from the court clerk’s office, preventing the journalists from lodging an appeal.L’oeil du Sahel, a regional weekly that was launched in Maroua in 1998, is one of the few newspapers to appear in the region. Receive email alertscenter_img May 31, 2021 Find out more Cameroonian journalist Paul Chouta sentenced and fined in defamation case Case against Amadou Vamoulké baseless, French lawyers tell Cameroon court RSF_en Cameroonian reporter jailed since August, abandoned by justice system Help by sharing this information News to go further April 29, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two journalists given prison sentences a week before World Press Freedom Daylast_img read more

Tweet On Navratri: Jammu & Kashmir High Court Refuses To Stay Investigation Against Advocate Deepika Singh Rajawat

first_imgNews UpdatesTweet On Navratri: Jammu & Kashmir High Court Refuses To Stay Investigation Against Advocate Deepika Singh Rajawat Sparsh Upadhyay26 Nov 2020 9:37 PMShare This – xThe Jammu and Kashmir High Court on Wednesday (25th November) refused to interfere in an ongoing investigation in relation to an FIR registered against Advocate Deepika Singh Rajawat by J&K police for her tweet on Navratri/Navratras.The Bench of Justice Sanjay Dhar specifically observed,”At this stage, it may not be appropriate to go into the merits of the rival contentions of the…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Jammu and Kashmir High Court on Wednesday (25th November) refused to interfere in an ongoing investigation in relation to an FIR registered against Advocate Deepika Singh Rajawat by J&K police for her tweet on Navratri/Navratras.The Bench of Justice Sanjay Dhar specifically observed,”At this stage, it may not be appropriate to go into the merits of the rival contentions of the parties and it will also be not proper to interfere in the investigation of the FIR, which is stated to be at its infancy.”However, the Court said that before a final view is taken in the matter by the Investigating Agency, “this Court needs to go into the issues raised in the instant petition.”It is pertinent to note that in the FIR registered against her, she had already been admitted to anticipatory bail by the Principal Sessions Judge, Jammu.In the aforesaid circumstances, the Court directed.”The investigation in the FIR may continue but the final report shall not be filed by the Investigating Agency before the competent Court without permission of this Court.”Case against RajawatThe petitioner- Advocate Dipika Singh Rajawat challenged FIR No.174/2020 registered against her for offences under Section 295-A and 505(2) IPC registered at Police Station, Gandhi Nagar, Jammu (for allegedly hurting religious sentiments of a community in her tweet on Navratri).Notably, on October 19, Rajawat had tweeted a cartoon, contrasting women safety with Devi pujan offered on Navratri, with a caption “Irony”.The picture juxtaposed two scenes: in one scene, a man touching feet of a female Hindu deity during the nine-day Hindu festival of Navratri; in the other scene, with the header other days, a man is aggressively holding both the legs of a woman.Rajawat had stated that she posted the said tweet “with an objective to raise voice against increasing rape cases in India and condemn people who bring atrocities on Women”.She further stated,”The said picture which highlights the hypocrisy of society towards women was not about religion. It neither abuse Hindu religion nor religious faith of Hindus.”The Senior Counsel appearing for her, contended that if “we have a look at the image that was tweeted by the petitioner, it does not, in any manner, hurt the religious feeling of any community, inasmuch as it simply depicts that the women are being revered during Navratras festival, whereas similar treatment is not given to them during rest of the days of the year.”Earlier, in her anticipatory bail plea, she had alleged that her tweet was painted communally by the BJP IT Cell, which also started an online campaign against her on social media demanding her arrest, and promoted the hashtag— #ArrestDeepikaSinghRajawat.Thereafter, Rajawat made several tweets, alleging that she was being threatened by the public and was “Not feeling safe” anymore. She also alleged that a mob had assembled outside her residence, and raised slogans against her.To this, the AAG submitted before the Court that she “has herself admitted in her petition that as a reaction to her aforesaid tweet, a particular outfit felt agitated and they held demonstration in front of her residence as a consequence whereof she had to approach the police for her protection.”On this basis, the AAG submitted that, “at this stage, it cannot be stated that the act of the petitioner has not hurt the feelings of any section of the community.”Rajawat had represented the Kathua gangrape victim in 2018.The matter has now been posted for further hearing on 09.02.2021. The Court has directed the respondents to file their response.Case title – Deepika Singh Rajawat v. Union territory of J&K and others [CRM(M) No.405/2020 CrlM Nos1528 & 1529 of 2020]Click Here To Download Order[Read Order]Next Storylast_img read more

Sinners, repent!

first_imgThe piazza was crawling with women. I would have felt like a kid in a candy store, had they not all been wearing habits. It was a muted rainbow of black, white, blue and brown veils waving in the wind, as the young women alternately giggled and cheered. They reminded me of the teens in clips of the first Beatles concerts, both in their giddiness and in the sense that they properly belonged in some different era. But the man inspiring their enthusiasm was not from Liverpool. He was the frail, octogenarian leader of a billion Catholics. And his fans had come not just to revel, but to repent as well, in a city which melds reveling and repentance like few others. The Wednesday morning Papal audience is usually the high point of a trip to Rome for the pilgrimtourist. But this week was different. This was Settimana Santa – Holy Week, the crescendo of the Christian calendar. Wednesday was only the beginning of a string of church services at St Peter’s. It was my fifth trip to Rome, so the wideeyed wonder that marks the firsttime visitor had eased a bit. The list of must-see sites that had governed my first visits – the Vatican museums, the Piazza di Spagna, the Forum – gave way to the aimless wandering through which Rome truly reveals herself. More than any other time of the year, Holy Week sees a mixing of holiday and pilgrimage. Men and women in clerical garb make their way through groups of university students on spring break, camerawielding tourist packs, and Clark Griswold-esque families following a tight program from the Trevi Fountain to Piazza dei Populi. Yet in the face of this relentless movement, this city conserves its secrets in shadows and quiet light. Nineteenth Century pastel buildings crowd narrow streets, with angles that even at the height of day frustrate the sun. The calmness is never totally overcome. Whether holiday or pilgrimage, I can never come through Rome without a visit to the Spanish steps. From the top of the steps, one can see the dome of St Peter’s and the white marble heights of the monument to Vittorio Emmanuele, the father of the modern Italian state. After a moment reflecting on the skyline, I stroll down to the Cappuccin Church, known for the macabre display of centuries-old monastic bones in its crypt. In it, skeletons in monastic robes stand watch over the inscription ‘What you are, we once were, and what we are, you too will be’. The guitars are just out of earshot. Of Rome’s many layers, faith would seem to have been squeezed by the tectonic shifts of politics and culture: the former with the unification of Italy and the end of the Papal States in 1870s, and the latter in an ongoing struggle between tradition and progress. This means a richness, one that lives in each step across the cobbled stones of Campo dei Fiori in the southern part of the city centre, where I spend the late afternoon. There is nothing reserved here – all is sound and movement, swirling around the ancient figure of a hooded Giordano Bruno, clutching a book in both hands. His head is bowed, toward the Vatican, but in judgement rather than reverence. His judgement is on the Vatican authorities who had him burned for his theological ‘errors’ at a stake set in that very place. Yet now it seems – with the Enlightenment perhaps vindicating his obstinacy – he should be looking up and gloating about history’s judgement. That such a statue stands in Rome’s centre suggests the uneasy relationship that remains between the city’s temporal and spiritual leaders. I make my way south from the city centre, keeping my map in my bag, wondering which of the city’s four hundred churches will appear before me around the next curve. After a day of wandering, following the Pope’s morning audience, I find relief from the hordes across the river to the south, in the Trastevere section of the city – so named for its location across the Tiber River, or ‘Tevere’. In the Piazza di Santa Maria in Trastevere, lights blink on to meet the twilight. Tables spill out of restaurants along with smells that will capture not just the stomach but the soul. The Piazza is alive with a spirit very different from St Peter’s in the morning. Replete with habits of a different sort, it is more of revelling than repentance. Around the fountain at its centre, carefully coiffed young Italian men summon their charms to woo scarlet-haired goddesses. These women will catch your eye and vanish like dreams so intoxicating it hurts to wake up. While this goes on, the Church of Santa Maria rises up in the square’s southwest corner. Its face is darkened with age, and with the thick blackness of modernity that hangs in the air. The church is open late during Holy Week. Inside, in dark corners defined by clusters of flickering flame, searching souls kneel alone. Their moving lips suggest that on this night, in this place, solitude may be more complicated than it first appears. Curious passers–by wander in. Some step purposefully, as if to assert themselves. For others, steps falter for fear of violating something – some space from another time. One woman dressed for a night out makes her way up the aisle, craning her neck at the carvings on the ceiling as if in a museum. Then she slips into an empty pew. Light flickers on golden mosaics, multiplying the force of the flame. She sits quietly.ARCHIVE: 6th week TT 2004last_img read more

What is The Best Steakhouse on Long Island?

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York It’s always a good time for steak, but since June is National Steakhouse Month, it’s time to settle once and for all which one is best.The public voted Peter Luger the Best Steakhouse on Long Island in the 2018 Bethpage Best of Long Island competition.We’re talking serious red meat for carnivorous connoisseurs. They expect nothing less than USDA Prime, and they get what they deserve at Peter Luger, voted once again The Best steakhouse on Long Island.They sink their teeth into Luger’s famous dry-aged premium short loins, carefully cared for under pristine conditions of temperature, humidity and air. Once these cuts are judged ready, they’re broiled to perfection and served with a great order of sides.People driving over the Williamsburg Bridge can see the original Brooklyn location where Peter Luger opened his restaurant in 1887. The Forman family bought the place in 1950, mastering the Porterhouse and so much more (Did anyone say “burgers”!?), and expanding the enterprise to Great Neck, where it beckons us today.To find all the other 2018 Bethpage Best of Long Island contest winners, visit bestoflongisland.com Nominate your favorite businesses and people in the 2019 Best of Long Island program starting Oct. 1.Peter Luger, 255 Northern Blvd.,  Great Neck  516-487-8800, peterluger.comlast_img read more

Busy time ahead for Doug Wilson: “I know I have to get to work”

first_imgSAN JOSE — General manager Doug Wilson was still trying to put things in perspective Thursday after the Sharks came up six wins short of capturing the franchise’s first Stanley Cup.That necessary time to reflect after the Sharks lost the Western Conference Final in six games, though, can only last so long.His captain, Joe Pavelski, wants to stay with the team but doesn’t have a contract. His star acquisition, Erik Karlsson, said he likes the organization but doesn’t know where he’ll land. …last_img

Next Generation Microchips Inspired byNature’s Nanotech

first_imgAn article in ComputerWorld1 reports that Hewlett Packard, IBM, Fujitsu, and Texas Instruments are putting effort into developing nanotechnologies for chip manufacturing based on a principle found in nature: the tendency of matter to fall into predictable patterns as molecules assume low energy states. There aren’t many structures that can be built today, but researchers are finding new ways to manipulate molecules all the time. IBM has been using self-assembly in a capacitor, and HP Labs have self-assembled 10-atom wide conductive wires.Self-assembly—the tendency of certain structures to fall naturally into patterns—is one of nature’s most common occurrences. On a grand scale, for example, wind direction, temperature and moisture in the air result in predictable types of storms.Now think smaller—much smaller. Certain molecules combine without guidance in predictable ways.  “Some molecules recognize each other and find natural low-energy states,” says W. Grant McGimpsey, a biology professor and director of the Bioengineering Institute at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts.   (Emphasis added in all quotes.)1 Steve Ulfelder,“Molecular Self-Assembly: Nanoscale circuits build themselves, breathing new life into Moore’s Law,” ComputerWorld, pg 28, 5 September, 2005.Certain molecules in nature recognize each other and combine into predictable patterns as they settle into low-energy states.  This fits very nicely with the Second Law of Thermodynamics and the formation of snowflakes, but is exactly the opposite of what evolutionists claim happened three or four billions of years ago on Earth at the origin of life.  Biological RNA and DNA are not mere crystals or repetitive patterns.  They are highly volatile and energetic, requiring cellular machinery to build and maintain.  Most important, they contain genetic information not derivable from the atoms of which they are composed nor from the laws of physics that describe how their parts interact.  In contrast, “Self-assembled materials form very simple patterns,” said one of the engineers.  Though ordered, these materials do not specify anything.  Though the article spoke of “natural self-assembly,” there was no mention of evolution – good, because evolution and engineering don’t logically mix.  Neo-Darwinian evolution is unguided and purposeless; the engineers here were harnessing natural processes toward intelligently-designed, functional ends.(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Multifamily Green Building Certification Still Has Issues

first_imgMuch of my work these days involves certification of multifamily buildings, and, thanks to a boom in apartment construction, my partner and myself are staying occupied.The one major contrast from single-family residential work, with which I am most familiar from my days as a contractor, is the long lead time. I still find it amusing that I sign a contract, have an initial start-up meeting with the developer and contractor, and often don’t see the project for another year or more, when the builder is ready for our insulation and air-sealing inspections.Due to this lag from start-up to our inspections, we can be suddenly quite busy inspecting buildings — often 3 or 4 in a single week. Just recently we inspected buildings in both Rome and Athens — but, unfortunately we never left the state of Georgia. Insulation is still the biggest challengeDepending on the certification program (we work with LEED for Homes, the National Green Building Standard, EarthCraft, Energy Star, and Enterprise Green Communities), we have to confirm that insulation installation meets either Grade 1 or Grade 2 specifications for these projects to be certified. RELATED ARTICLES Whole lotta firing going onOur enforcement of insulation standards leads to a lot of friction on the job site. When you walk through a job and pull out about 80% of all the insulation for correction, you get some pushback.Insulators complain that they aren’t being paid enough, builders complain that we are delaying their schedule, and we complain because we get all itchy from touching insulation all day. We have caused insulators to quit and get fired, and we have even been fired as consultants from a project because the builder blamed us for their delays.The part about this that bothers us the most is that while we are enforcing green building standards, typically these standards are no more stringent than the energy code and the insulation manufacturer’s instructions. These instructions call for the equivalent of Grade 1 and all necessary air barriers.Unfortunately, the baseline we are compared to is so far below these standards that many builders cannot easily get to where they need to be. It’s the air leakage, stupidBeyond the quality of the installation, we also find missing air barriers throughout the multifamily buildings we inspect.Attic kneewalls (those walls that separate conditioned space from unconditioned attics) require rigid air barriers on the attic side and (in Climate Zone 3) a minimum of R-18 insulation. These details are rarely identified in the plans and specs, so builders don’t budget for this extra work. Elevator shaft, corridor, and stairwell walls need to meet the same installation specifications as exterior walls, and, due to scheduling issues, these are often insulated and covered with drywall before we get to inspect them. I have had contractors remove lots of drywall to have the insulation inspected (and corrected) in order to meet certification requirements.Architects install all sorts of bump-outs that create chases in the exterior walls, many of which do not get the proper air barrier installed. I can’t count the number of times I have pulled out a piece of insulation to check the installation only to find a big hollow cavity behind it, missing all the required air sealing and essentially leaving a gaping hole in the building envelope. There is some hopeGreen consultants who provide certification, are, in most cases, viewed as a necessary evil, often ignored by most of the construction and development team.Raters and green consultants should be welcomed as key members in a project team – on an equal footing with the architect, engineers, builders, and others.While we do see some progress – the occasional call from an architect or developer before their plans are complete – this does not happen as frequently as it should. When the design and development team understands what green professionals have to offer, and bring them in very early in the process, we will start seeing more buildings that are truly high-performance.center_img In our initial meetings, we stress the importance of this, and urge our clients to consider something other than batt insulation due to the challenges of meeting the installation quality requirements. Unfortunately, the budgets rarely allow for these upgrades, so we constantly find ourselves struggling with the installers.We always schedule a meeting before insulation work starts to review our requirements and to confirm that the installer can meet them. This is the point at which we start hearing the falsehoods. The managers always insist they have great crews who are fully trained to meet the Grade 1 standard, but inevitably when they show up on site, no one has discussed installation quality with them and they just start doing their regular old Grade 3 work.I can’t blame the installers (at least most of the time), as many are paid on a piece-work basis and in most cases, they are not only not being paid enough for the quality work we need, chances are they were never told that the job required Grade 1. Be afraid — be very afraid — of “value engineering”One ongoing problem we find is “value engineering” during the estimating or construction process to lower construction costs — a common practice in the building industry.The problem arises when the individual making the decision to make a specification change isn’t aware of the implications on certification. They might be able to save $100,000 or more by swapping out windows in a building, but, if the new windows don’t meet the minimum requirements, the building may not be able to be certified.If there is a contractual agreement to have the building certified, a seemingly small change may end up costing more than it saves. Pondering the Sorry State of Green BuildingWhat Were They Thinking?Seeking the Elusive Grade 1 Batt InstallationBatt Insulation is Still Making Me BattyInstalling Fiberglass RightShould Batt Insulation Be Outlawed?Grading the Installation Quality of InsulationQuestions and Answers About Air BarriersNavigating Energy Star’s Thermal Bypass Checklistlast_img read more