Japan Journal: Avoiding jet lag on the trip to Tokyo for A’s baseball

first_imgTOKYO, Japan — Konnichiwa!That’s about the extent of my knowledge of the Japanese language, unfortunately. But the good news is I have arrived in the land of the rising sun for MLB’s Opening Series between the A’s and Mariners.There are plenty of things I’d like to explore out here and will share with all of you by putting together these journal entries throughout the week.But they say the journey is just as important as the destination and the journey I’m coming off of is quite a unique …last_img

Next Generation Microchips Inspired byNature’s Nanotech

first_imgAn article in ComputerWorld1 reports that Hewlett Packard, IBM, Fujitsu, and Texas Instruments are putting effort into developing nanotechnologies for chip manufacturing based on a principle found in nature: the tendency of matter to fall into predictable patterns as molecules assume low energy states. There aren’t many structures that can be built today, but researchers are finding new ways to manipulate molecules all the time. IBM has been using self-assembly in a capacitor, and HP Labs have self-assembled 10-atom wide conductive wires.Self-assembly—the tendency of certain structures to fall naturally into patterns—is one of nature’s most common occurrences. On a grand scale, for example, wind direction, temperature and moisture in the air result in predictable types of storms.Now think smaller—much smaller. Certain molecules combine without guidance in predictable ways.  “Some molecules recognize each other and find natural low-energy states,” says W. Grant McGimpsey, a biology professor and director of the Bioengineering Institute at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts.   (Emphasis added in all quotes.)1 Steve Ulfelder,“Molecular Self-Assembly: Nanoscale circuits build themselves, breathing new life into Moore’s Law,” ComputerWorld, pg 28, 5 September, 2005.Certain molecules in nature recognize each other and combine into predictable patterns as they settle into low-energy states.  This fits very nicely with the Second Law of Thermodynamics and the formation of snowflakes, but is exactly the opposite of what evolutionists claim happened three or four billions of years ago on Earth at the origin of life.  Biological RNA and DNA are not mere crystals or repetitive patterns.  They are highly volatile and energetic, requiring cellular machinery to build and maintain.  Most important, they contain genetic information not derivable from the atoms of which they are composed nor from the laws of physics that describe how their parts interact.  In contrast, “Self-assembled materials form very simple patterns,” said one of the engineers.  Though ordered, these materials do not specify anything.  Though the article spoke of “natural self-assembly,” there was no mention of evolution – good, because evolution and engineering don’t logically mix.  Neo-Darwinian evolution is unguided and purposeless; the engineers here were harnessing natural processes toward intelligently-designed, functional ends.(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

The Video Editor’s Holiday Wish List

first_imgWithout a doubt, some people are hard to buy for. Luckily, video editors are always in need of tools and toys that complement their workflow and workspace. Here’s a few to consider.Top image via LogickeyboardIt’s the season of giving, so if you’ve got a video editor on your shopping list (or you are a video editor looking to spice up your workspace), these gifts will definitely deliver in the “holiday cheer” department.Keyboards and Skins: $29.90-$149.90Image via LogickeyboardThe folks over at Logickeyboard have a plethora of products for a wide variety of software applications. Stuff that stocking with a keyboard skin, or go all out and get a backlit keyboard customized for your software of choice. Take your pick of products for Adobe Premiere, After Effects, Audition, AVID, Final Cut, and a handful of other software apps. Speakers: $150KRK Rokit 5 G3 speakers are an excellent addition to any video editor’s studio. These speakers offer up maximum headroom with minimal distortion and are sure to impress clients hanging around the suite. The Rokit 5 G3 also provides flexible connectivity, allowing for input via XLR, TRS or RCA connection.Headphones: $99.99Sony’s MDR-7506 headphones are a popular choice for video editors, mainly due to their closed ear design which lets you edit in uninterrupted peace. The headphone has a foldable design, making it convenient to store or transport, and its coiled cable allows it to stretch and spring back into place whenever you need a bit more reach.Books: $12Image via Matthew Bell’s A2 BlogWalter Murch’s classic In the Blink of an Eye: A Perspective on Film Editing is a staple for the editor’s bookshelf. Get insights into the craft of editing from a master film editor known for his work in Apocalypse Now, The Godfather: Part III, The English Patient, Cold Mountain, Tomorrowland, and over twenty other huge Hollywood titles.External Hard Drives: $149.99-$499.95In the age of large video files, the external hard drive is a necessity for most editors. Check out these excellent options from G-Technology and LaCie.Store your footage on a large desktop external, or spring for a more rugged and mobile design. Both companies offer up a wide array of options.Software: $899Red Giant creates software tools for filmmakers. Color correct, stylize, refine and clean up footage with their Magic Bullet Suite 13 software. Not ready to drop that kind of cash for software? Well, download the trial version and take it out for a test run.Throw Pillows: $14Make sure your 2017 edit sessions are nice and comfortable with a custom throw pillow from Redbubble. If a pillow isn’t enough, drop some extra money on a t-shirt, sweater, and whatever other knick-knacks you can find to fill your office.What are you hoping to find in your video editing stocking? Share your wish list in the comments below!last_img read more

Sony Xperia XZ1 fresh leaks, shows off huge camera module and big flash

first_imgSony is working on three Xperia phones and could unveil them at IFA 2017 in Berlin.  The Xperia XZ1 was recently spotted on an unknown Chinese website revealing the specs of the phone and now a leak from Slashleaks.com has revealed the phone in its full glory.The rear view of the phone reveals a large camera module and a big flash. The phone shows off a metal-built and the looks similar to the design of the the Xperia XZ Premium and Xperia X. The rumoured Xperia XZ1 is expected to come with Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 SoC and 4GB RAM. The smartphone could sport a 5.1-inch full HD and flaunt a metal body as seen in the new leak. There are talks that the Xperia XZ1 could come with 19MP rear camera and a 13MP selfie snapper. The phone could be fuelled by a 3000mAh battery and come in colour options like Moonlight Blue, Venus Pink, Warm Silver and Moonlight Blue. The phone could run on Android 8.0 and priced around Rs 55,000.Also Read: Sony Xperia XZ1, XZ1 Compact images leaked, may launch by September 10The phone like the typical Xperia phone sports a rectangular design on the back with slightly rounded edges which offers a good hold on the phone. In a separate 3D CAD video, the alleged Xperia XZ1 is seen sporting the 3.5mm audio jack which many companies are ditching these days. A power button along with volume and shutter button is paced at the right edge of the phone while the hybrid SIM tray is placed at the left edge. There’s a home button that also doubles up as the fingerprint sensor.advertisementSony is also working on Xperia XZ1 Compact and Xperia X1 alongside the XZ1. While we know very little about the Xperia X1, there was a recent rumour that the Xperia XZ1 Compact could be priced lower than the Xperia XZ1. It could cost around Rs 48,000. The phone is purported to come with 4.6-inch display and run on Android 8.0. The phone could house 32GB of internal storage.last_img read more