Passionate pursuits

first_img Read Full Story Pedro Lamothe-Molina, Ph.D. ’17, hopes to continue researching infectious diseases while taking care of patients and racing the occasional triathlonIn 1996, Pedro Lamothe-Molina applied to medical school in his hometown of Mexico City. He easily met all the academic requirements. But when school officials met him for an interview in person, they decided they couldn’t accept him—because he was 12.“I did include my birthday on the application, but I guess they didn’t notice it,” said Lamothe-Molina.He did eventually get his medical degree from Facultad Mexicana de Medicina, Universidad La Salle and this month, Lamothe-Molina will receive a Ph.D. in Biological Sciences in Public Health from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. His focus at Harvard Chan has been on understanding the immune response to HIV — in particular, why some people are better than others at fending off the virus.Home-schooled by his father and several tutors, Lamothe-Molina wanted to study medicine so he could become a doctor like his father and grandfather before him. When that didn’t pan out, Lamothe-Molina decided that engineering would be a good alternative, since he’d always loved math and its applications. Undeterred by his medical school rejection, Lamothe-Molina applied to and was accepted at the Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey.While in school, Lamothe-Molina focused on engineering projects related to biology. For one project, he designed an electronic device that could measure and record patients’ vital signs. His invention was selected as one of the top 20 in a worldwide competition.last_img read more

What is The Best Steakhouse on Long Island?

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York It’s always a good time for steak, but since June is National Steakhouse Month, it’s time to settle once and for all which one is best.The public voted Peter Luger the Best Steakhouse on Long Island in the 2018 Bethpage Best of Long Island competition.We’re talking serious red meat for carnivorous connoisseurs. They expect nothing less than USDA Prime, and they get what they deserve at Peter Luger, voted once again The Best steakhouse on Long Island.They sink their teeth into Luger’s famous dry-aged premium short loins, carefully cared for under pristine conditions of temperature, humidity and air. Once these cuts are judged ready, they’re broiled to perfection and served with a great order of sides.People driving over the Williamsburg Bridge can see the original Brooklyn location where Peter Luger opened his restaurant in 1887. The Forman family bought the place in 1950, mastering the Porterhouse and so much more (Did anyone say “burgers”!?), and expanding the enterprise to Great Neck, where it beckons us today.To find all the other 2018 Bethpage Best of Long Island contest winners, visit bestoflongisland.com Nominate your favorite businesses and people in the 2019 Best of Long Island program starting Oct. 1.Peter Luger, 255 Northern Blvd.,  Great Neck  516-487-8800, peterluger.comlast_img read more

Foulkes is the local hero – in extra time

first_img Local man Martin Foulkes deserved to win the English Men’s Mid Amateur Championship for the Logan Trophy at his home club of Worksop even if he had to win it twice.He looked to be cruising to the title with a comfortable four-shot lead with two holes to play when disaster struck. A quadruple-bogey eight at the 17th when he tangled with the punishing rough, saw the 36 year old finish with a level par 72 for 214, two under, and into a tie with Paul Kirkwood, who returned 71.It meant a sudden death playoff, Foulkes winning with a par four at the first hole after Kirkwood had missed the fairway and the green then failed with his par putt.“It proved more difficult that it should have been but I got there in the end,” said Foulkes. “I’ve possibly taken eight on the 17th before but I can’t remember when. But this is a massive win for me. I’ve won county events but never a national title.“It’s also massive for the club. Playing on your home course brings extra pressure and there were so many good players in the field. I’m delighted.”In ideal conditions but with the course asking its usual difficult questions, particularly on the greens, Foulkes began the day sharing the lead on two under with Scot David Primrose. But the Worksop man raced away, covering the front nine in 32 strokes with an eagle and three birdies.That saw him open a five-shot lead which no one managed to reduce. It looked a one-horse race with Foulkes seemingly cantering home. But the 17th came back to bite him.He drove into the left rough, gained a free drop from a staked tree, then took three more shots to escape before his approach finished short of the green. A chip and two putts later and his advantage had disappeared.“In hindsight I should have just chipped out,” Foulkes added. “After that my head was spinning. Before I teed off on 17 I was cruising. I didn’t know the situation but at six under, I didn’t think anyone had got to that and if I could finish four-three I would be O.K. Then that happened.”At the last he still had a chance to win in normal time if he could hole a lengthy putt. But, with his head still spinning, he had to settle for a par three and extra time.Kirkwood admitted he wasn’t expecting to be in a playoff. “I saw Martin having trouble on the 17th but I didn’t know that he had taken eight,” he said.“I had a good go at my putt in the playoff but I wasn’t expecting to do this well this week. “I’m a bit disappointed but fair play to Martin to make par and he deserved to win.”Surrey-based Primrose closed his successful week with 74 for 216, level par, and third spot with Lancashire’s Michael Hunt, who returned a second successive 70 for 217.Past champion Martin Young (74) from Hampshire and Justin Phelps (71) from Middlesex shared fifth place on 219, while Worcestershire’s Paul Scarrett, joint runner-up a year ago, posted 69, the best round of the day, for equal seventh spot.For the second successive day the tournament was graced by a hole-in-one. It was achieved by Stephen Brennan who sank his five iron tee shot at the 207-yard eighth hole.“The ball faded into the flag and my wife told me it had gone in,” said Yorkshire-based Brennan. “It was my sixth hole-in-one but only the second in competition.”For more information, visit the Logan Trophy webpage. 6 Jul 2014 Foulkes is the local hero – in extra time last_img read more