Center-right incumbent wins Portugal’s presidential election

first_imgLISBON, Portugal (AP) — The center-right incumbent candidate has won a resounding victory in Portugal’s presidential election. Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa captured 61% of the vote Sunday to serve a final five-year term. He had widely been expected to win. Rebelo de Sousa devoted most of his victory speech to the COVID-19 pandemic, saying his first thoughts went to its victims and promising to work for an economic recovery once it was over. Socialist candidate Ana Gomes came second with 13% but close behind in third was André Ventura, a newly arrived right-wing populist whose 12% was a stunning development. Such a showing for Ventura would have been unthinkable until recently and will send a shudder through Portuguese politics.last_img

University announces honorary degree recipients

first_imgIn addition to commencement speaker Lord Christopher Patten, the chancellor of Oxford University, Notre Dame will award six honorary degrees at its 170th Commencement ceremony on May 17, the University announced in a press release Monday.The honorary degree recipients, whose accomplishments span the fields of education, business, medicine and religion, are: Freeman A. Hrabowski III, John E. Kelly III, Jane McAuliffe, Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, Shirley Welsh Ryan and Fr. Thomas F. Stransky.Hrabowski, who has served as the president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County since 1992, will receive a doctor of laws degree, the release stated. A mathematician who grew up in Birmingham, Alabama, during the peak of the civil rights movement, Hrabowski also serves as the chair of the President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans.Kelly, senior vice president of solutions portfolio and research for IBM, will receive a doctor of engineering degree. He has held several different positions at IBM, beginning in 1980, and helped redesign the semiconductor processing and device fabrication clean room in Stinson-Remick Hall of Engineering, according to the release. McAuliffe serves as the director of the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress, which gives scholars the opportunity to research and interact with members of Congress, and will receive a doctor of laws degree. She has previously worked as the president of Bryn Mawr College from 2008 to 2013 and as as dean of Georgetown College at Georgetown University from 1999 to 2008. According to the release, McAuliffe is also a scholar of the Qur’an and early Islamic history.Quiñones-Hinojosa works as a professor of neurosurgery and oncology and director of the brain tumor surgery program at Johns Hopkins Hospital and will receive a doctor of science degree. According to the release, he was born in a small village outside of Mexicali, Mexico, and graduated from both the University of California, Berkeley and Harvard Medical School.Ryan, who along with her son Corbett, a 2005 Notre Dame graduate, are the namesakes of Ryan Hall, will receive a doctor of laws degree. She is a trustee emerita of the University and served on the National Council on Disability, which led to the American with Disabilities Act, the release stated.Stransky, a Paulist priest and the rector emeritus of the Tantur Ecumenical Institute in Jerusalem, will receive a doctor of laws degree. According to the release, Stransky contributed heavily to one of the Second Vatican Council’s most important documents, the 1965 Declaration on the Relation of the Church to Non-Christian Religions. Stransky is also a former president of the Paulist fathers.Tags: 2015 Commencement, Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, Fr. Thomas F. Stransky, Freeman A. Hrabowski III, Honorary degree, Jane McAuliffe, John E. Kelly III, Shirley Welsh Ryanlast_img read more

Europe says Tamiflu-resistant virus seen in 9 countries

first_imgFeb 1, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – European officials yesterday reported more evidence that one of the three types of seasonal influenza viruses is showing resistance to oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and said this represents the first clear sign that the resistant variant can spread.A report published yesterday by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) says the resistant variant of the influenza A/H1N1 virus accounted for 59 (14%) of 437 European H1N1 isolates from 19 countries tested so far. The variant has been seen in nine of the 19 countries, according to the report in Eurosurveillance.The new report suggests the resistant variant is more widespread than indicated by the initial report from the ECDC on Jan 27. That report said the resistant virus was found in four countries and made up 19 of 148 isolates tested.Increased H1N1 resistance to oseltamvir was also reported in the United States and Canada this week. US officials said about 5% of tested isolates showed resistance, and Canada reported that about 10% were resistant.European report: Norway most affectedThe resistant virus has a mutation called H274Y, which confers approximately a 400-fold reduction in susceptibility to oseltamivir, according to the Eurosurveillance report. Oseltamivir is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) as the drug of choice for human patients with H5N1 avian influenza, and many countries have stockpiled it in case the H5N1 virus evolves into a pandemic strain.From the tests so far, resistance is most common in Norway, where 26 of 37 H1N1 isolates (72%) were resistant, according to Eurosurveillance. Other countries most affected are France, 15 of 87 isolates (17%); Germany, 3 of 43 (7%); and the United Kingdom, 8 of 162 (5%). A few resistant isolates were also reported in Denmark, Finland the Netherlands, Portugal, and Sweden.The resistant viruses have come from both adults and children, and there is no indication that any of the patients had been treated with oseltamivir or been in contact with others so treated, the report says. It is not unusual for resistance to emerge in patients receiving oseltamivir treatment for H1N1 infections, according to the WHO.”We therefore conclude that the identification of these oseltamivir-resistant viruses as a substantial proportion of circulating viruses, particularly in Norway, is the first clear evidence that influenza A(H1N1) virus with the H274Y mutation can readily transmit between individuals,” the Eurosurveillance report states.An accompanying Eurosurveillance editorial says resistant viruses with the same mutation were seen in previous flu seasons but “were few in number, ‘unfit,’ and transmitted poorly. . . . These [current] A/H1N1 isolates with the H274Y mutation are fitter. They are in several countries and are transmitting in the community.”The specimens tested to date are from early in the season, and it may be that as the season progresses ordinary A/H1N1s [will] predominate,” the editorial continues. “Equally, the resistant viruses may come to predominate,” as influenza A viruses resistant to two older drugs, amantadine and rimantadine, did in North America 2 years ago. Officials have said the oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 viruses remain susceptible to amantadine and rimantadine.WHO report: Increased resistance unexpectedThe WHO, in a statement yesterday, said the increased drug resistance is unexpected and so far unexplained, especially since few of the patients are known to have taken oseltamivir. “Influenza viruses are continuously changing, and it is possible that a resistant strain has emerged spontaneously,” said the statement, released in a question-and-answer format.While noting that the resistance problem is not limited to Europe, the WHO said no H1N1 isolates from Japan, where oseltamivir is used far more commonly than in most other countries, have shown the resistance mutation so far this season. The same was true for Hong Kong.The WHO said H1N1 is the predominant flu virus in many European countries and other parts of the northern hemisphere so far this season. The increased oseltamivir resistance has not been found in the other two seasonal flu viruses, A/H3N2 and B.The agency said the implications of the resistance problem for the treatment of H5N1 cases are uncertain. “The neuraminidase protein in human H1N1 viruses is different from that in avian H5N1 viruses. Until we learn why the unexpected increase in oseltamivir resistance has occurred in H1N1 viruses, it is too early to know what, if any, potential there might be for a similar increase to occur in H5N1 viruses.”The WHO added that it has not changed any of its H5N1 treatment recommendations.In other observations, the WHO said:So far, the evidence for most of the patients infected with the resistant virus is that they were not linked in any way.There is no evidence that the resistant viruses are causing more severe illness than other flu viruses.There is no sign that the resistant viruses are more transmissible than nonresistant viruses.The drug resistance does not affect the effectiveness of flu vaccines, and the H1N1 strain used in this year’s vaccine is well-matched to the circulating H1N1 strains.See also:Eursurveillance reporthttp://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=8026Eurosurveillance editorialhttp://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=8025WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/influenza/patient_care/antivirals/oseltamivir_faqs/en/index.htmllast_img read more

Robin van Persie reveals he had one doubt about leaving Arsenal to sign for Man Utd

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 22 Jul 2020 5:16 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link336Shares Robin van Persie joined Man Utd from Arsenal in the summer of 2012 (Picture: Getty)The ‘little boy inside him’ infamously convinced Robin van Persie to defect from Arsenal to Manchester United, but the former Red Devils striker admits he did have one doubt in his mind when he moved from the Emirates to Old Trafford.The former Netherlands international left the Gunners in acrimonious circumstances in the summer of 2012 when he openly criticised Arsene Wenger’s transfer policy and claimed Arsenal were incapable of matching his ambition.United ultimately beat Manchester City to his signature, agreeing a £24million deal for a player who had just over a year remaining on his contract. Van Persie was an instant hit at his new club, but after enjoying so many battles against the likes of Rio Ferdinand, Nemanja Vidic and the like, he was unsure how he would be received in the dressing room.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘There was a question from my point of view as well, before I signed, just to check how the older players were looking at me coming to play there,’ Van Persie told United’s official website. Robin van Persie reveals he had one doubt about leaving Arsenal to sign for Man Utd Robin van Persie’s goals fired Manchester United to the 2012/13 title (Picture: Getty)‘I wanted to know if they were ok with it or not, because we had been competing for the last eight years and we are all human. ‘What was important for me was that the guys would accept me as the player and person that I am. After I checked that, everything was positive.’Asked how he found out what his new team-mates thought of him, Van Persie added: ‘Through [Rene] Meulensteen, the assistant coach. He did that and everyone was very positive. After that, it was like the training sessions were different – because it is different with every coach, it is not better or worse, it is just different. More: Manchester United FCRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseEx-Man Utd coach blasts Ed Woodward for two key transfer errors‘But what I noticed with myself, if you look at my body for example, of course during the first couple of years with Arsenal, when I was 25 and 26, if you compare that body physically to the body I had after a year in Manchester, there was more muscles. ‘It was stronger, you could see it from my upper body, from my bum, there were a couple more kilos there and it was all muscle, which must be – because I sometimes I ask myself the question why that was – because of the training sessions and the gym sessions that we did.’MORE: Jack Grealish advised to join big club like Manchester United or Tottenham by Gabby AgbonlahorMORE: Anthony Martial must show more ‘desire and passion’, says Manchester United legend Andy ColeFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. Commentlast_img read more

ams: Micro Camera Modules for medical imaging applications and minimally invasive surgery

first_imgams announced the introduction of the latest products in its NanEye family. The NanEyeM and NanEyeXS will enable the production of high-performance, single-use endoscopes for use in minimally invasive surgery.The new 1mm2 NanEyeM offers a high-resolution 100kpixel readout over an LVDS digital interface at a maximum rate of 49 frames/s at 62MHz. The NanEyeM, which is supplied as a Micro Camera Module (MCM) including a cable up to 2m long, features a custom multi-element lens which greatly improves the effective resolution of the sensor and reduces distortion. Compared to the earlier NanEye 2D sensor, which has a single-element lens, the new NanEyeM offers improved MTF (Modulation Transfer Function) of >50% in the corners, lower distortion of <15%, and lower color aberration of <1Px.The new NanEyeXS from ams has a 0.46mm2 footprint, making it one of the world´s smallest image sensors. It produces a digital output in 40kpixel resolution at a maximum rate of 55 frames/s at 28MHz. The sensor’s very small size offers significant advantages when developing ultra-small instruments for minimally invasive procedures, enabling the design of surgical devices with a very small diameter, or freeing more space for working channels in larger devices. Like the NanEyeM, the NanEyeXS is supplied as an MCM. The NanEyeM is also available in surface-mount chip form.In volume, endoscopes based on the new NanEye sensors will have a low enough unit cost to support the emerging single-use market. This has numerous benefits, including eliminating the risk of cross-contamination resulting from ineffective sterilization, avoiding high maintenance costs, and minimizing the risk of disruption of operating theater schedules when re-usable endoscopes are unavailable for use. Chip-on-tip endoscopes based on the NanEyeM or NanEyeXS also offer much higher image quality than is available from the conventional optical fibre-based endoscopes which are widely used in operating theaters. The NanEye image sensors produce sharper pictures, better contrast and a smoother video output to enable practitioners to more accurately and precisely guide surgical equipment inside the patient’s body.Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: Boards & Modules, Chips & Components Continue Reading Previous ERNI and Amphenol sign second-source agreement on MicroSpeed connector systemNext Winbond announces 64Mbit addition to 1.2V SpiFlash memory familylast_img read more

Iran begins using advanced centrifuges violating deal

first_imgTehran: Iran said Saturday it has fired up advanced centrifuges to boost its enriched uranium stockpiles, in the latest scaling back of commitments under a crumbling 2015 nuclear deal. The country’s Atomic Energy Organisation said, however, that it would honour commitments to give UN inspectors access to monitor its nuclear sites. Three European countries — Britain, France and Germany — have been engaged in talks to try to rescue the 2015 deal that gave Iran relief from sanctions in return for curbs on its nuclear programme. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USTensions have been escalating between Iran and the United States since May last year when President Donald Trump pulled out of the accord and began reimposing sanctions that have crippled its economy. The arch-foes were on the cusp of confrontation in June when Iran downed a US drone and Trump ordered retaliatory strikes before cancelling them at the last minute. On Saturday, Iran’s Atomic Energy Organisation said it had activated 20 IR-4 and 20 IR-6 centrifuges as its latest step back in rolling back its commitments. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls”The centrifuge machines, as they are engaged in research and development, will help with increasing the stockpile,” said the agency’s spokesman, Behrouz Kamalvandi. “The capacity of these machines is many times more than the previous machines. This started as of yesterday (Friday),” he told a news conference in Tehran. Under the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), Iran was allowed to enrich uranium using only first generation — or IR-1 — centrifuges. US Defence Secretary Mark Esper said he was “not surprised that Iran has announced that it’s going to violate the JCPOA”. “It’s no surprise that the Iranians are going to pursue what the Iranians have always intended to pursue,” he said in Paris. Kamalvandi said Iran would allow the International Atomic Energy Agency to continue monitoring its nuclear programme, as it has done under the 2015 accord. “Regarding the monitoring and accesses of the IAEA… so that everything is clear (Iran’s) commitments regarding transparency will be followed as before,” the spokesman said. The European Union on Friday emphasised its reliance on the UN nuclear watchdog to monitor Iran’s activities as it voiced “great concern” over the country’s decision to roll back its commitments. The IAEA in its latest report, on August 30, said it continues to verify compliance through cameras and on-site inspections. But in an apparent hint at worries about access it said “ongoing interactions… require full and timely cooperation by Iran”. The latest move by Iran came after EU members Britain, France and Germany were unable to find a way to offset the impact of sanctions on the country before a September 7 deadline set by the Islamic republic. “If Europe wants to do something, it must hurry, because returning to the situation before reducing commitments could take time,” Kamalvandi said. Tehran has already hit back twice with countermeasures in response to the US withdrawal from the 2015 deal. On July 1, Iran said it had increased its stockpile of enriched uranium to beyond the 300-kilogram maximum set by the deal. A week later, it announced it had exceeded a 3.67-percent cap on the purity of its uranium stocks. On Saturday, however, Iran indicated it had no plans to step up the enrichment of uranium to higher levels. “We currently do not need 20 percent enrichment, and if we do so at some time, we will first increase the 4.5 percent stockpile and then act,” said Kalamvandi. The announcement came on the eve of a visit to Iran by the acting head of the IAEA, Cornel Feruta. Kamalvandi said Feruta would meet the head of Iran’s Atomic Energy Organisation, Ali Akbar Salehi, and Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif.last_img read more