Tectonic evolution of the Pacific margin of Antarctica. 1. Late Cretaceous tectonic reconstructions

first_imgWe present new Late Cretaceous tectonic reconstructions of the Pacific margin of Antarctica based on constraints from marine magnetic data and regional free-air gravity fields. Results from interpretation of new seismic reflection and gravity profiles collected in the Bellingshausen Sea are also incorporated in the reconstructions. The reconstructions show regional constraints on tectonic evolution of the Bellingshausen and Amundsen Seas following the breakup between New Zealand and West Antarctica. The breakup began at c. 90 Ma with the separation of Chatham Rise, probably accompanied by the opening of the Bounty Trough. Campbell Plateau separated from West Antarctica later, during chron 33r (83.0-79.1 Ma). A free-air gravity lineation northeast of Chatham Rise represents the trace of a triple junction that formed as a result of fragmentation of the Phoenix plate a few million years before Chatham Rise separated from West Antarctica. Remnants of the western fragment, the Charcot plate, are preserved in the Bellingshausen Sea. Subduction of the Charcot plate stopped before 83 Ma, and part of it became coupled to the Antarctic Peninsula across the stalled subduction zone. Subsequent convergence at the western margin of this captured ocean floor produced the structures that are the main cause of the Bellingshausen gravity anomaly. Part of a spreading ridge at the western boundary of the Phoenix plate (initially Charcot-Phoenix, evolving into Marie Byrd Land-Phoenix, and eventually Bellingshausen-Phoenix (BEL-PHO)) probably subducted obliquely beneath the southern Antarctic Peninsula during the Late Cretaceous. All of the Phoenix plate ocean floor subducted at the Antarctic Peninsula margin during the Late Cretaceous was probably <14 Myr old when it reached the trench. Several observations suggest that independent Bellingshausen plate motion began near the end of chron 33n (73.6 Ma). Reconstructions in which part of the West Antarctic continental margin, including Thurston Island, is assumed to have been within the Bellingshausen plate seem more plausible than ones in which the plate is assumed to have been entirely oceanic.last_img read more

Advising system can cause problems for double majors

first_imgAs course registration approaches, many students are visiting their advisers’ offices for help choosing their courses for the upcoming semester. But for students pursuing multiple programs of study, that meeting is not always as effective as many think it should be.Last week, the Undergraduate Student Government passed a resolution recommending that USC consider offering interdisciplinary advisers that could help students figure out how to best approach their double major or minor.Gene Bickers, vice provost for undergraduate programs, said he thinks advising is an important issue and one that should be addressed.“What USG is calling for is more sharing of information and more responsibility at the university level,” Bickers said. “And I think that is right on track … I think it is something that needs more attention.”Under the current system, students who have majors in two different programs are assigned to two different advisers. The proposed interdisciplinary adviser would serve as a separate entity, overseeing students whose majors or minor fall in distinct departments.“I think it would be a good resource,” said Caroline Jing, a sophomore majoring in public relations and international relations.Advising across USC varies by department. For Annenberg students, for example, it is mandatory that you meet with your adviser at least once a semester. Marshall, meanwhile, only requires students to meet with an adviser during their freshman and senior years.“It does get tricky,” said Heather Cartagena, assistant director of undergraduate programs. “It is the decision by those departments that [freshmen and seniors] are the most critical students … they do not have the resources to meet with all their students.”For small schools like the Roski School of Fine Arts and the School of Theatre, there are only two advisers on staff because that is enough to serve the low number of students. Majors like biology and business administration have a large number of students and limited counseling staff.In the past, one of the big obstacles for students pursuing multiple programs was that, with the varying advising systems, often information did not get passed from one adviser to another.“We found that advisers from different departments and schools were creating completely separate advising records,” Bickers said. “There was not enough sharing of information.”In 2007, a database was created to coordinate better communication between advisers, and since then measures to create more efficient communication between departments have continued to improve, Bickers said.Every adviser has access to the database where they can relay information and send referrals and comments to each other. Each student has a profile listing their GPA, units completed, majors and minors.Regulations are also implemented in the current system that help advisers maintain contact with other departments. For example, there is an audit after the fifth semester for students who have a double major. For the audit, advisers from each department are required to meet together to make sure a student is on path to graduate.But, despite the efforts to foster open communication and effectiveness some students still find trouble navigating through their schedule.“It would be interesting to see statistics showing how many students had to stay an extra semester because of poor planning,” said Christine Tung, a junior majoring in biology and philosophy.As more students begin to find a second major or minor, methods of advisement efficiency are in question.“It’s a timely thing to be talking about,” Bickers said. “It’s certainly something we will listen too.”last_img read more

Calabasas weighs open space, resort

first_imgCALABASAS – City voters will cast ballots Tuesday on an ordinance that would protect open space and an advisory question on a proposed resort. The advisory vote, Measure C, asks whether Calabasas should annex about 152 acres on Mulholland Highway east of Las Virgenes Road for the Malibu Valley Inn and Spa – a proposed 203-room resort, plus five estate homes and facilities for swimming, equestrian use, tennis, spa, restaurant, winery, shops and conference rooms. This project would be in lieu of one project for up to 81 estate homes that would be built on 443 acres in unincorporated Los Angeles County. The Board of Supervisors already has approved the project. The Calabasas city attorney’s impartial analysis of Measure C says an environmental impact report for the proposed housing project and a draft environmental report for the resort annexation indicated the housing project would generate 948 weekday vehicle trips, compared with 1,878 weekday vehicle trips for the proposed resort. “Approval of the Calabasas Open Space Initiative will help preserve existing areas of open space in our city,” supporters said in the official argument in favor of Measure D. There was no official argument submitted opposed to Measure D. Both Measure C and Measure D require a simple majority vote. Eric Leach, (805) 583-7602 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Supporters of the resort say it would reduce grading and disturbed areas by more than 400 percent compared with the housing project, cut building square footage in half, and save more than 300 acres from development. Mary Hubbard of the Malibu Canyon Community Association argued against Measure C, saying the resort would introduce commercial zoning near parkland in the Santa Monica Mountains area and might increase traffic problems there. Because Measure C is advisory only, it does not bind the city, property owner or Los Angeles County Local Agency Formation Commission, which must also approve such an annexation. Measure D, on the other hand, is a proposed city ordinance designed to protect open space by requiring approval by two-thirds of the voters of any designation of lands classified as open space in the Calabasas general plan. This would leave the city’s voters with the ultimate choice of whether open space land should be converted to other uses. If it is approved it would take effect 10 days after the City Council certifies the results of the election. last_img read more

Northern California woman who slipped, died at Lake Tahoe’s Eagle Falls ID’d

first_imgEMERALD BAY — A woman who died at Eagle Falls was identified as 35-year-old Dina Stephanie Espinosa from the Bay Area, according to authorities.Espinosa was sitting in a pool of water near the waterfall Friday when she slipped while reaching for a branch, and was swept away in fast-moving waters, according to a statement from the El Dorado County Sheriff.A search and rescue team and dive team recovered Espinosa’s body, who was found deceased, according to the sheriff’s department.A GoFundMe …last_img

Aiming for Energy Efficient Affordable Housing in Sacramento

first_imgUPDATED 12/15/2010: With additional details from Domus Development.When money is no object, the pursuit of green (and green) in homebuilding has been known to include some pretty extravagant renewable-energy systems, on top of whatever energy efficiency details are built into the envelope. Recent examples: the 4,539-sq.-ft. first-place winner of the 2010 Connecticut Zero Energy Challenge, which includes a geothermal system and extensive solar power system, and a 5,000-sq.-ft. LEED Platinum home in California with a $2.3 million listing price.But as is justifiably the case, projects that achieve energy efficiency at a relatively low price tend to generate more curiousity among builders. The second-place winner of the CT Zero Energy Challenge came in at 2,690 sq. ft. and about $320,000 in construction costs, and a Green Mountain Habitat for Humanity project in Charlotte, Vermont, is aiming for Passive House performance. And last week, a news report surfaced about groundbreaking on another project aiming to merge low construction costs with energy efficiency, a housing-and-commercial development just north of downtown Sacramento, California, that will include 81 units and about 5,000 sq. ft. of commercial space.A tie-in to light railThe housing plan has two parts: a four-story mixed-use building with 63 apartments in various configurations (9 studios, 24 one-bedrooms, and 30 two-bedrooms) over six “micro-commercial” spaces; and, on an adjacent infill lot, a set of 18 three-story townhouses designed to be 80% more energy efficient than comparable structures built to code. Both parts of the project, which is being developed by San Francisco-based Domus Development, will be supplemented by rooftop solar power and solar hot water systems.Called La Valentina, the project is emerging on a desolate corner lot that had been vacant for almost two decades – a location, one resident of the neighborhood told the Sacramento Press, that was dangerously derelict and seriously in need of redevelopment. The location does have a built-in advantage, however: it is a few steps away from the La Valentina/Alkali Flat station serving the Regional Transit District’s light rail system in Sacramento.Erin Kelly, a project assistant at Domus, told GBA that the portion of the project that includes the townhouses, known as La Valentina North, features three-bedroom units ranging in size from 1,005 to 1,215 sq. ft. in both flat and townhouse-style configurations. The capacity of the solar power system for the entire complex is 38.4 kW. All La Valentina North units have been designed for net-zero-energy performance, Kelly added. Although Domus is not at liberty to disclose prices at this point, she noted that all units in the complex will be available for rent to tenants earning between 30% and 60% of the area median income.last_img read more

PROJECT TOYS – COMMERCIAL – PAYS 150000

first_imgAdvertisement Facebook Advertisement Twitter WEDNESDAY AUGUST 10TH 2016PRODUCT: PROJECT TOYSCASTING: FRIDAY AUGUST 12TH 2016*** NO RECALLSSHOOT DATE: AUGUST 20TH 2016FITTING: AUGUST 17TH 2016AIRING: WORLD WIDERATE: 500.00 SESSION 1000.00 BUY OUT 50.00 FOR FITTINGCONFLICTS: *** PLEASE NOTE BASED ON A POTENTIAL ‘IN PERP’ POSSIBLITY I HAVE MADE SURE CLIENT DOES NOT HOLD ANY ADD’L TOY CONFLICTS.CASTING NOTE: THERE ARE NO ACTUAL SCRIPTED LINES IN THE STORY BUT I’VE INCLUDED SOME IN THE SPECS THAT YOU COULD IMAGINE BEING SAID BY THE CHARACTERSSEEKING…HERO BOY: 5 -6 CAUCASIAN – “DON’T BE SAD. I’LL BE OK MOMMY.” “HI. I’M NEW HERE TOO.”HERO MOM: EARLY 30’S – CAUCASIAN – “YOU’RE MY LITTLE HERO. BE GOOD.” “YOU’RE GOING TO DO GREAT!”GIRL: 5 – 7 HISPANIC – “DADDY, I DON’T WANNA GO. I’M SCARED.” “I DON’T HAVE ANY FRIENDS HERE.”DAD: 3MID TO LATE 30’S – HISPANIC – “YOU’LL BE OK MY SWEET GIRL.” “DADDY IS SO SO PROUD OF YOU!”STORY BOARDS WILL BE POSTED ON SIDES EXPRESS.PLEASE SUBMIT ASAP PLEASEMANY THANKSSTEVEN MANNMANN CASTING NON UNION PROJECT TOYS CASTING THIS FRIDAYA FEW DIFFERENT ROLES BUT REALLY LOOKING FOR HISPANIC DADS PLEASE DON’T SEND ME A FACEBOOK MESSAGE- PLEASE SEND YOUR PICTURE AND CONTACT # TO [email protected] Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With:last_img read more

Conservative salaries bill backed by grand chiefs

first_img(Saskatoon-Rosetown-Biggar MP Kelly Block shakes hands with a constituent. Photo from http://kellyblock.ca/)APTN National NewsOTTAWA–Saskatchewan’s most prominent First Nations organization is backing a Conservative private members bill that, if passed, would force band chiefs and councils to disclose their salaries and expenses.The Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations said Friday afternoon that they fully endorsed Saskatoon-Rosetown-Biggar MP Kelly Block’s bill, which was introduced in the House of Commons earlier in the day.“I’ve had a quick look at it in terms of what it presents to do. The FSIN, again, fully endorses financial accountability and transparency of all,” said Grand Chief Guy Lonechild. “I think its just another step in the direction to ensure that first nations are accountable and a prime example of how transparent we need to be.”In an interview with APTN National News, Block said she had spoken to several First Nations leaders in the province about her bill and that she had received their support.“A colleague of mine and I have been working together and calls were made to a number of First Nations chiefs in Saskatchewan and so far the response has been positive to this legislation,” said Block.The bill, called the First Nations Financial Transparency Act, would require the publishing of all federally-funded chief and council expenses and salaries by the beginning of August every year. The Minister of Indian Affairs would publish the information if a band refused to comply.Besides salary, the financial data would include expenses for transportation, accommodation, meals, incidentals and hospitality.First Nations leaders have the power to set their own salaries and some of them are paying themselves more than provincial premiers and cabinet ministers.Block said she developed the idea for the bill with fellow Saskatchewan MP Rob Clarke, who represents the riding of Desnethe-Missinippi-Churchill River.“I have been made aware that this is a longstanding issue with some First Nations community members,” she said. “There are a number of examples of legislation in place for other elected officials to disclose this kind of information and I believe that it is time to provide similar legislation for members of First Nations band councils.”The bill also received the support of a northern Ontario grand chief.Nishnawbe Aski Nation Grand Chief Stand Beardy said he has no problems with the bill because his organization is already transparent.“I think it’s only fair to have an idea of where the money is going,” said Beardy.Block said that Indian Affairs Minister John Duncan supported the bill.The bill is expected to face second reading at the end of November. It would then be sent to the Commons Aboriginal Affairs committee for debate.Watch the full report on APTN National News at 6 p.m. ET.last_img read more