EQUALITY? Dunedin father and daughter sentenced over incest

first_imgNZ Herald 25 January 2017Family First Comment: If consenting loving adults means equality and we should be ‘free to love’, then here’s an interesting statement by the judge …“Judge Kevin Phillips said it was very serious repeat offending which strikes at the heart of what the community would consider right and proper conduct.”Maybe now – but for how long?#slipperyslopeA Dunedin father and daughter have been ordered to stay away from each other for two years after being sentenced for incest for the second time.The pair – aged 37 and 23 – were last year convicted of incest for the second time after the discovery of the pair’s second child.At this morning’s sentencing, the father was sentenced to six months community detention and two years’ intensive supervision. The daughter was sentenced to two years of intensive supervision.The pair are not to associate during that time and the father is not come within 100km of Dunedin, and reside elsewhere in the South Island.Judge Kevin Phillips said it was “very serious repeat offending which strikes at the heart of what the community would consider right and proper conduct”.The offending came to light after police attended a domestic disturbance at the pair’s home in 2013 and found an infant at the residence which they suspected was fathered by the defendant.The pair were first convicted in 2012 after the birth of their first child.READ MORE: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11788494Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Clayton Kershaw climbs next step in comeback

first_imgCINCINNATI >> They were probably not the 22 most important pitches of the Dodgers’ season — but that’s only because there are more significant steps ahead in Clayton Kershaw’s recovery.But Kershaw did throw off a mound Saturday, his first time on a mound since July 16 when his back pain flared up following a simulated game at Dodger Stadium. He completed his throwing session just before a storm dropped heavy rain on Cincinnati, leaving him to do his conditioning work on the stadium steps in a steady rain.“It went good. Some pitching stuff to work on but physically I felt good,” Kershaw said, keeping his comments brief after the workout.Kershaw would not say how significant the step was in his mind. “I felt good. I don’t know,” he said. “Until you face hitters, you don’t really know for sure. But I feel 100 percent right now so that’s a good sign.”The Dodgers clearly thought it was significant. Dodgers manager Dave Roberts, pitching coach Rick Honeycutt and bench coach Bob Geren all watched Kershaw’s throwing session first hand.“I thought it was successful,” Roberts said. “With my own eyes, I thought the intensity was there. Very productive.”Kershaw is expected to throw a longer bullpen session (approximately 40 pitches) on Tuesday in Los Angeles. They are keeping the rest of the plan “under wraps,” as Kershaw put it Friday.Giants matchups The Dodgers have set their rotation through next week’s series against the San Francisco Giants in Los Angeles.Left-hander Scott Kazmir will start on regular rest Monday in Cincinnati, allowing the Dodgers to push right-hander Kenta Maeda back to Tuesday in the series opener against the Giants.Maeda will be working on six days’ rest. The Dodgers have made a point of giving Maeda extra rest whenever possible and it has paid off. When pitching on four days’ rest, he is 4-5 with a 3.75 ERA, 1.21 WHIP and a .237 opponent’s batting average. On extended rest, he is 8-2 with a 2.96 ERA, 1.01 WHIP and a .208 opponents’ batting average.“From my experience with Japanese players, there’s more than just the innings that he has to endure,” Roberts said. “The rest is different from Japan baseball (where pitchers pitch roughly once a week) to here. But there are also other things of every day life that he has to adjust to. Getting comfortable with the ballpark, his family finding places to eat, a grocery store — all that stuff plays into wearing on your mind. It’s a lot. I think it’s not only a transition in baseball. There’s other variables that Kenta has handled very well.“So with that, whenever we feel that we can give him an extra day or two to get his mind right, his body I think it proves a benefit.”Left-hander Rich Hill is scheduled to make his Dodgers debut Wednesday against the Giants. Saturday’s starter, Brett Anderson, is scheduled to start the series finale against the Giants on Thursday.The Giants are expected to start left-hander Madison Bumgarner on Tuesday, right-hander Johnny Cueto on Wednesday and their trade-deadline acquisition, left-hander Matt Moore, in the series finale.Reddick re-setStruggling outfielder Josh Reddick was not in the starting lineup against Reds left-hander Brandon Finnegan Saturday. While Roberts said Reddick would be back in the lineup Sunday, he sounded inclined to move Reddick out of the fourth spot in the order he has occupied in 10 of his 14 starts since being acquired from the Oakland A’s.“I haven’t decided that yet,” Roberts said Saturday. “To get a day off is one thing. But also sometimes to get a different visual as far as where you’re at in the lineup, that changes things too. So I’m going to do whatever I feel is best to get him going.”Roberts said he has had “conversations” with Reddick, trying to help him deal with the pressure to make a good impression with a new team and the unrealized expectations that have become a black cloud following him. Reddick is 10 for 61 (.164) with one extra-base hit (a double) and no RBIs in his first 15 games with the Dodgers.“Everyone’s going to go through struggles,” Roberts said. “All hitters go through that. At the beginning of the season, it’s magnified. And with Josh coming over to a new team, it’s magnified. We expect him to get out of it and be the hitter he’s been his whole career.”center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Raiders owner Mark Davis: Families of Hall of Famers should get rings, too

first_imgThe Hall of Fame reversed its previous policy of not awarding jackets and rings to families of members selected posthumously, with spokesman Pete Fierle confirming to Denver’s 9News.com that the “process” to create Bowlen’s jacket and ring were already “underway” when he died June 13.It’s not the first change to be made ahead of the NFL’s 100th season, as the Hall of Fame tentatively approved a class of 20 inductees for next year earlier this week. The maximum number of inductees each year currently sits at eight.The eight men set to be inducted in the 2019 class in Canton, Ohio, on Aug. 3 in addition to Bowlen are cornerback Champ Bailey, personnel executive Gil Brandt, tight end Tony Gonzalez, cornerback Ty Law, safety Ed Reed, safety Johnny Robinson, and center Kevin Mawae. “David Baker and the Hall of Fame made the right decision, and I believe it opens the door to reconsidering awarding rings and jackets to the families of all deceased enshrinees,” Davis told ESPN.com on Tuesday. “It opens the door to making it right for other families, like Junior Seau’s and Kenny Stabler’s.”There’s no reason I should have my father’s ring and Bruce Allen does not have his. As a new member of the NFL owners Hall of Fame Committee, I’ll continue to advocate for the families.” Related News Pro Football Hall of Fame 2020: ‘Centennial Class’ likely to have 20 inductees NFL-NFLPA talks about new CBA set to ramp up, report says Mark Davis continues to be an advocate for posthumous Pro Football Hall of Fame recognition.The Hall of Fame awarded a gold jacket and ring to the family of late Broncos owner Pat Bowlen, who passed away after his election but before his induction, in a move the Raiders owner commended as he expressed excitement about the precedent. Ezekiel Elliott apologizes after meeting with Roger Goodell: ‘I made a poor decision’last_img read more