Arjun Rampal and pregnant girlfriend Gabriella Demetriades enjoy summer vibes. See pic

first_imgArjun Rampal is all heart for Gabriella Demetriades. The actor, who recently announced girlfriend Gabriella’s pregnancy, posted an adorable picture with her on Instagram.The actor captioned the photo, “Summer vibes.”Earlier, Arjun took to Instagram to reveal Gabriella’s preganacy with a loved-up post. He shared a picture with her, where she is seen flaunting her baby bump, and said, “Blessed to have you and start all over again….thank you baby for this baby.”Before dating Gabriella, Arjun Rampal was married to Mehr Jesia. The couple, however, announced their separation on July 25, 2018. The couple announced their decision to end the marriage in a joint statement.Arjun has two daughters with Mehr – Mahikaa, who is 17-year old, and Myra, who is 13.Initially, Arjun kept his relationship with Gabriella under the wraps. But the Rock On actor made it official through an Instagram post.Rumour has it that Arjun met Gabriella during an Indian Premiere League afterparty in 2009, but they reconnected and began dating only a few years ago. She was by his side when his mother, Gwen Rampal, passed away last year.It was earlier reported that Mehr is taking Gabriella’s preganancy news sportingly. According to a report in Mumbai Mirror, though Arjun and Mehr haven’t filed for divorce yet, Mehr’s friends say that she has accepted the fact that Arjun has moved on.advertisement”They are still working out the financial terms of the separation,” Mehr’s friend told the daily. “Mehr is a wonderful mother and wants to do what works best for her children,” her friend added.Also Read | Arjun Rampal’s ex-wife Mehr Jesia is fine with his girlfriend Gabriella Demetriades’s pregnancy: ReportAlso See | Arjun Rampal announces girlfriend Gabriella Demetriades is pregnant: Thank you baby for this babyALSO READ | Has Arjun Rampal moved in with his girlfriend Gabriella Demetriades?ALSO READ | Inside story of Arjun Rampal and Mehr Jesia’s separationALSO WATCH | Ranbir-Katrina to Farhan-Adhuna, big Bollywood break-ups of 2016last_img read more

Calgary quadruple homicide Owner of burnedout car believed to be main target

first_imgCALGARY – A man and two sisters found dead in a burned-out car may not have been the intended targets in what Calgary police are describing as a brutal and ruthless quadruple homicide.Investigators are exploring the possibility that Cody Pfeiffer, 25, Glynnis Fox, 36, and Tiffany Ear, 39, were “simply at the wrong place and at the wrong time with the wrong people,” acting Insp. Paul Wozney said Thursday.Lorenzo Ear, the younger brother of the two women, said his sisters leave behind 16 children between them.“The younger ones, they don’t know yet,” he said. “That’s going to be something that we as family are going to have to find out how to explain to them, that their mothers are no longer around.”The bodies of Pfeiffer, Fox and Ear were found Monday after firefighters extinguished a burning 2011 Chevrolet Cruze at a construction site in a new subdivision on Calgary’s northwestern edge.Wozney, with the major crimes unit, said it’s believed the Cruze’s owner, Hanock Afowerk, 26, was the target.Police confirmed that Afowerk was found dead in a rural area west of Calgary on Wednesday and that it was a homicide. They had earlier appealed to the public for help finding him and expressed concern for his safety.It’s possible Fox and Ear — from the Stoney Nakoda Nation west of Calgary — were caught up in a targeted attack against Afowerk, police said.All four victims suffered significant traumatic injuries, but Wozney declined to elaborate.“I will say that it … certainly has been surprising to some very seasoned investigators.”Police believe multiple people may have been involved and that it’s possible there are several different crime scenes.“We know that there’s people in the community that have information regarding this event. We know that people know what happened. If they’re scared, if they are in any way hesitant to contact us, they can do so anonymously through Crime Stoppers or through our tip line,” said Wozney.It appears the sisters got to know Pfeiffer and Afowerk recently, he added.Lorenzo Ear said his sisters were generous, caring and kind mothers who loved their children. Tiffany had nine, and had recently become a grandmother.“I believe she really enjoyed that role. Even though it made her seem a little bit older, she was still happy.”Glynnis had seven children and was about to become a grandmother when she died.Both women were working on upgrading their education, their brother said, adding Tiffany loved books and Glynnis had a passion for learning about First Nations culture.They wanted to one day find jobs as teachers or in other professions that would allow them to help people, he said.An aunt who did not want her name published said in an email that Tiffany had been through a lot and struggled to make ends meet at times.“She kept her head up, always positive and recently completed a treatment program in December of 2016 and changed her life around,” said the aunt.The sisters were among 11 siblings, Lorenzo said, adding he wants to speak out about them to help the families of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.The family has been gathering at Tiffany’s home to get it ready for the wake, finding comfort in sprucing up the lawn and putting a fresh coat of paint on the inside.“What we’re doing is being a family unit, being together, being closer, laughing with each other, helping each other.”last_img read more

Tropical Depression Five Creeping Up On Us

first_img Weekend Weather Watch – storms and general TCI weather for weekend Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp System becomes Tropical Storm Danny Tropical Watch with three systems being monitored Related Items:atlantic ocean, tropical depression Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOKNWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL200 AM EDT FRI SEP 5 2014For the North Atlantic…Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico:1. An area of low pressure, associated with a tropical wave, locatedjust south of the Cape Verde Islands is producing disorganizedshowers and thunderstorms. Some slow development of this system ispossible over the next several days while it moves westward at about15 mph. This system could bring locally heavy rain and gusty windsin squalls to portions of the Cape Verde Islands today.* Formation chance through 48 hours…low…20 percent.* Formation chance through 5 days…medium…30 percent. Recommended for youlast_img read more

Sodium selective DNAzyme sensor

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences © 2015 Phys.org However, studying sodium in real-time in living cells has proved difficult. Most biological fluorescence sensors are not selective for sodium, often binding to potassium, or are not feasible in a cellular environment, requiring organic solvents. Other applications cannot provide real-time data. A team from the Departments of Biochemistry, Chemistry, and Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has devised a biological fluorescent sensor that is selective for sodium ions and has demonstrated its ability to sense sodium in living cells. Their work was recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.The University of Illinois team took advantage of recent developments in developing deoxy-ribozymes, or DNAzymes. DNAzymes are a kind of catalytic DNA that is obtained in the lab using a high throughput selection process. Prior research has demonstrated how DNAzymes can be used as metal ion sensors by designing them to have fluorescent labels that are only “turned on” when the DNAzyme binds the target metal and catalyzes enzymatic reactions. While these studies have demonstrated DNAzymes that can bind monovalent ions, such as Na+ or K+, thus far they have not been selective for sodium over potassium. The University of Illinois team identified and tested a DNAzyme that is more than 1,000-fold selective for sodium ion over other metals. Furthermore, their DNAzyme can detect sodium concentrations that are within the range typically seen in cells (0.135-50mM), and their detection method is fast enough that real-time studies can be conducted.DNAzymes can be converted to a fluorescent sensor by placing a fluorophore on one portion of the DNAzyme and a fluorescence quencher on another potion. As long as the fluorophore and the quencher are in contact, only background fluorescence is observed. Once the DNAzyme binds the target metal ion, Na+ in this case, it initiates cleaving a loop of DNA at a particular nucleotide, releasing the substrate portion with the fluorophore. It is separated from the quencher resulting in a fluorescent signal. New test for germs: Fluorescing DNAzymes detect metabolic products from bacteria Citation: Sodium selective DNAzyme sensor (2015, May 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-05-sodium-dnazyme-sensor.html Scheme of the decaging process for the photolabile Na+-specific DNAzyme. Credit: (c) 2015 PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1420361112 Explore further More information: “In vitro selection of a sodium-specific DNAzyme and its application in intracellular sensing” PNAS, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1420361112AbstractOver the past two decades, enormous progress has been made in designing fluorescent sensors or probes for divalent metal ions. In contrast, the development of fluorescent sensors for monovalent metal ions, such as sodium (Na+), has remained underdeveloped, even though Na+ is one the most abundant metal ions in biological systems and plays a critical role in many biological processes. Here, we report the in vitro selection of the first (to our knowledge) Na+-specific, RNA-cleaving deoxyribozyme (DNAzyme) with a fast catalytic rate [observed rate constant (kobs) ∼0.1 min−1], and the transformation of this DNAzyme into a fluorescent sensor for Na+ by labeling the enzyme strand with a quencher at the 3′ end, and the DNA substrate strand with a fluorophore and a quencher at the 5′ and 3′ ends, respectively. The presence of Na+ catalyzed cleavage of the substrate strand at an internal ribonucleotide adenosine (rA) site, resulting in release of the fluorophore from its quenchers and thus a significant increase in fluorescence signal. The sensor displays a remarkable selectivity (>10,000-fold) for Na+ over competing metal ions and has a detection limit of 135 µM (3.1 ppm). Furthermore, we demonstrate that this DNAzyme-based sensor can readily enter cells with the aid of α-helical cationic polypeptides. Finally, by protecting the cleavage site of the Na+-specific DNAzyme with a photolabile o-nitrobenzyl group, we achieved controlled activation of the sensor after DNAzyme delivery into cells. Together, these results demonstrate that such a DNAzyme-based sensor provides a promising platform for detection and quantification of Na+ in living cells. (Phys.org)—Sodium ions are key regulators in cellular processes. The fluids in cells, whether it is water, blood plasma, or nutrients, are regulated by the sodium concentration in cells. If scientists could study sodium ions within a live cell, they would gain important insights into cellular processes including ways to reprogram these processes for biotechnological applications. DNAzymes are determined by subjecting a library of synthetic DNA candidates to in vitro binding studies using column-based and gel-based selection methods. Potential candidates are then amplified and tested until an optimal candidate is determined. Through this selection and amplification process, this group found a DNAzyme, labeled NaA43, that was selective for Na+. The next step was to make the fluorescent label. Every DNAzyme has two segments, the substrate and the enzyme strand. For this experiment, as NaA43S and NaA43E are the substrate and enzyme, respectively. The 5′ end of NaA43S was labeled with a known fluorophore, and a quencher was placed at its 3’end. An additional quencher was added to the 3′ end to ensure a minimal amount of background fluorescence. When Na+ was added, NaA43S was cleaved at the target nucleotide, and the fluorophore was released from quenchers. The result was an increase in fluorescent signal. Furthermore, fluorescence did not significantly change when twenty-two other metal ions were tested.Finally, the DNAzyme needed to be prepared for cellular insertion and detection. The process of delivering the DNAzyme into the cell could result in premature cleavage, so this team employed “photocaging” to control when the substrate was cleaved. Photocages are photoactive molecules that are placed at the cleavage site to prevent DNA substrate cleavage. When light at a certain wavelength is irradiated at the site, the photo-caged group is released, and then the substrate can be cleaved.Finally, in order to transport the DNAzyme through the cell membrane and into the cytosol, they used a class of alpha-helical cationic polypeptide that is known to facilitate transportation through the cell membrane. After four-hour incubation into living HeLa cells, NaA43ES was found to be located predominately in the cytosol and did not accumulate in other organelles. The cleavage site was “uncaged” by irradiating the cell with light (365 nm) for thirty minutes. Then they enhanced the sodium levels in the cells. As sodium ions traveled from the extracellular matrix to within the cell, fluorescence measurements increased during this time, demonstrating intracellular Na+ detection in living cells.This work reports the first use of a DNAzyme to make a real-time, selective sodium ion sensor that can be used in living cells. Since sodium selectivity has been difficult to achieve, and these studies will not only allow for additional studies on cellular activity but may also shed light on ion selectivity, in general. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Register now for ACVs Europe Regional training sessions

first_img UPDATE: Air Canada Vacations has made a correction on the Winnipeg date training and added a number of additional training dates. The correction and additional dates have been added below.MONTREAL — Travel agents across the country are invited to attend Air Canada Vacations’ Europe Regional training sessions ahead of its 2019 Europe Collection launch.At each session, ACV’s sales team will share highlights of the product lineup along with its new programs and partnerships. Portugal Tourism, the main event sponsor, will present alongside other Europe suppliers like Avis Rent A Car, Azamara Cruises, Insight Vacations and Royal Caribbean International.“Our Europe collection continues to expand and the resulting support from our trade partners has been fantastic,” said Dana Gain, Senior Director of Sales, Groups & Partnerships at ACV. “We’re already seeing a terrific response from the trade and a lot of great feedback. Make sure you block your seat while there’s still space!”Agents can register via the following links:January 15, Formation Rive-Sud: https://aircanadavacations.formstack.com/forms/europe_regional_training_south_shoreJanuary 15, Kelowna: [email protected] << Previous PostNext Post >> Share Travelweek Group January 15, Hamilton: https://aircanadavacations.formstack.com/forms/europe_regional_training__hamiltonJanuary 15, Oshawa: https://aircanadavacations.formstack.com/forms/air_canada_vacations__oshawa__europe_reginoal_training_15_january_2019_breakfast_eventJanuary 16, Formation Granby: https://aircanadavacations.formstack.com/forms/europe_regional_training_granbyJanuary 16, Victoria: [email protected] 17, Langley: [email protected] 17, Barrie: https://aircanadavacations.formstack.com/forms/europe_regional_training_barrieJanuary 17, St. Catherine’s: https://aircanadavacations.formstack.com/forms/europe_regional_training__st_catherinesJanuary 17, Formation Saguenay: https://aircanadavacations.formstack.com/forms/europe_regional_training_saguenayJanuary 23, Formation QC avec AC: https://aircanadavacations.formstack.com/forms/europe_regional_training_quebecJanuary 25, Gatineau: https://aircanadavacations.formstack.com/forms/europe_regional_training_gatineauJanuary 31, Halifax: https://aircanadavacations.formstack.com/forms/europe_regional_training_halifaxFebruary 6, St. John’s: https://aircanadavacations.formstack.com/forms/europe_regional_training_st_johnsFebruary 27, Winnipeg: https://aircanadavacations.formstack.com/forms/europe_regional_training_winnipegMore news:  FIVE FESTIVE FOODS TO TRY AT EUROPE’S CHRISTMAS MARKETSAir Canada Vacations is reminding travel agents that when clients book 180 days prior to departure, they save up to $1,000 per couple. When they book 120 days prior, they save up to $500 per couple, and $300 per couple when booking 90 days prior. This offer is valid on bookings made between Nov. 5, 2018 and Dec. 31, 2019, for travel from Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 2019. Register now for ACV’s Europe Regional training sessions Tags: ACV, Air Canada Vacations, Europe, Training Posted by Monday, January 14, 2019 last_img read more