WEEHAWKEN BRIEFS

first_img1 / 2  The residents of Weehawken’s Housing Authority senior citizens’ housing at 525 Gregory Ave. celebrated the 100th birthday of fellow-resident Peter Manchesani earlier this month. (See brief.)  2 / 2  Dancer Timo Nuñez will appear with Pedro Cortes’ Flamenco Soul in the Summer Concerts on the Hudson final show on Aug. 23 (See brief). ❮ ❯ ×  1 / 2  The residents of Weehawken’s Housing Authority senior citizens’ housing at 525 Gregory Ave. celebrated the 100th birthday of fellow-resident Peter Manchesani earlier this month. (See brief.)  2 / 2  Dancer Timo Nuñez will appear with Pedro Cortes’ Flamenco Soul in the Summer Concerts on the Hudson final show on Aug. 23 (See brief). ❮ ❯ Weehawken resident, 100, talks about his lifeA former Union City superintendent of public works who turned 100 years old this month says he made up his mind to live long in order to compensate for the early demise of his brother.The residents of Weehawken’s Housing Authority senior citizens’ housing at 525 Gregory Ave. celebrated his birthday earlier this month.Peter Manchesani rose in the ranks from truck driver for the Union City Public Works, to become its superintendent. He worked for the department for 40 years before retiring in 1974.On hand to celebrate the milestone were his son, daughter, son-in-law, and great granddaughter, along with many of the residents of 525 Gregory Ave. Union City’s Commissioner of Senior Citizen’s Affairs, Celin J. Valdivia presented him with a printed testimonial on behalf of Union City Mayor Brian P. Stack.The son of Italian immigrants, Manchesani was born Aug. 1, 1917, the year the U.S. entered World War I, noted Weehawken Mayor Richard F. Turner, who was on hand to mark the occasion.Manchesani’s parents owned Manchesani’s Central Fruit Market on 25th Street and Central Avenue in Union City, and the family lived in an apartment upstairs. Every day, young Manchesani would help his father purchase fresh produce for the family market.Manchesani was the youngest of three children: He had a brother, Patrick and a sister, Louise. “I’m the baby,” he said. “I made up my mind I had to make 100 because I lost my brother when he was 48 years old,” he said. “I lost a good brother.”“He’s always been in really good health,” Dominic Marchesani, of Clifton, said of his father.”He lives a very healthy life. He didn’t drink; he didn’t smoke; he always was very physical; and he worked out a lot.”Indeed, Marchesani was the picture of youth at his birthday party, walking in on his own, and sporting a hat that read, I’m not old: I’m vintage.Manchesani was married for 65 years to dressmaker Grace Carmel Capaldo,, and, in addition to his son, Dominic, has a daughter, Diana Both children were on hand to celebrate the centennial. He has four grandchildren. Xena, 13, one of his seven great grandchildren, presented him with a gold and diamond necklace emblazoned with the number “100.”Manchesani, who moved to Weehawken in 2007, is often found in the mornings in the lobby at 525 Gregory Ave., greeting visitors with small talk and a smile.center_img Flamenco music and dance to close Summer Concerts on the Hudson 2017An evening of music and dance with Pedro Cortes’ Flamenco Soul will climax this season’s Summer Concerts on the Hudson, co-sponsored by The Hudson Reporter.Pedro Cortes was credited by The New Yorker for helping to keep Flamenco alive in New York City. He comes from a family of Spanish Gypsy guitarists and began his studies with his father and the legendary Flamenco guitarist Sabicas. He has had works premiered with the Teatro Albeniz in Madrid and the Carlota Santana Spanish Dance Company at the Joyce Theater in New York. Cortes was commissioned by the Coen Brothers to compose music for their film “Paris Je T’Aime.”The concert will take place on Wednesday, Aug. 23 at 7 p.m. at Lincoln Harbor Park, located just north of the Chart House restaurant on the west bank of the Hudson River in Weehawken. Free parking is available at the Weehawken Recreational Park and also in the parking deck behind 1000 Harbor Boulevard. Please use 1600 Harbor Boulevard for GPS directions.The summer long series of open air concerts free of charge are presented by The Hudson Riverfront Performing Arts Center, Inc. (HRPAC), a New Jersey not-for-profit. The concerts are family friendly. Limited seating is available; however, audience members are asked to bring a lawn chair or blanket, if possible, and encouraged to picnic on the lawn. A rain date, if needed, will be scheduled for the following night.For more information please check the HRPAC website, www.hrpac.org, or call the concert info line at (201) 716-4540.last_img read more

DEGENOVA, JEANNE

first_imgA funeral service was offered June 7 at St. Matthews Lutheran Church in Secaucus for Jeanne DeGenova, 79. She passed away June 4 at her home, surrounded by her family. Born in Jersey City to the late John Henry and Marie (Gugel) Holsten, Jeanne lived in North Bergen for many years before settling in Toms River. She was an avid drum and bugle corps fan, and was a mom to many other children as a chaperone in the Meadowlarks and Royal Brigade Drum and Bugle Corps. Predeceased by her brothers John and Robert Holsten, she is survived by her husband, James DeGenova, Sr.; daughters Lynda Machel and husband Norman, and Laura Beckmeyer and husband Brian; son James Jr. and wife Lynda; brother James Holsten; sisters Kathleen Kolendriski and Sharon Holsten; and grandchildren Brian Jr. and Amanda Beckmeyer, Jamie and Emily DeGenova, and Eric and Joanna Machel.Services arranged by the Mack Memorial Home, Secaucus.last_img read more

Tips on reaching consumers when they’re on the go

first_imgMobile is still booming. People now spend more time on their smartphones than on their desktops and laptops combined. And the gap is widening. We are now officially past the smartphone tipping point. Now that users are in the mobile world, how do we get them into our mobile world? Here are a few tips to encourage them to download and use your mobile banking app.Tip #1 — Keep it simpleWork with your IT team from the very beginning to make the process of downloading and using your banking app as painless as walking into one of your branches and opening up a checking account. On the other end of the process, train your in-branch team members as well as your online and telephone helpline staff on guiding your users through downloading and setting up your app.These associates should know everything about this process just like they are expected to know everything about the other products you offer. The people jumping into a mobile banking app at this point aren’t exactly early adopters. They’ll need a little technology hand holding, and the financial institutions that do that will capture this end of the adoption bell curve. continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Do we really want Portugal’s drug laws?

first_imgThe Spectator 18 June 2017Family First Comment: A very interesting analysis that you won’t hear from the Drug Foundation…“The pro-drug lobby likes to quote Portugal at us not because it wants Britain to copy what Portugal has done but because it counts on us not knowing what actually happens to drug-users in Portugal and hopes that we will confuse the words ‘decriminalised’ with ‘made legal’. The latter is what metropolitan liberals really want, not because they are especially concerned with the health of drug addicts on distant council estates but because they rather like using drugs themselves.”And note from the graph that arrests for drug offences have INCREASED! (despite the Drug Foundation saying that “it’s a health issue, not a criminal issue”)‘The war on drugs has failed,’ asserted Shirley Cramer, chief executive of the Royal Society for Public health in the latest propaganda coup for the pro-drug lobby. Her society, along with the Faculty of Public Health, have parroted the familiar call among metropolitan liberals for drugs to be decriminalised. Their argument is that we should drop our punitive approach to drugs and be more like Portugal, which decriminalised drugs in 2001 and now, it claims, has fewer deaths from drug use that.There are a couple of problems with this. Firstly, drug decriminalisation in Portugal is only a success if you cherry-pick your statistics carefully. If you want to make the opposite argument you can pick a few which work in the other direction – such as pointing out that there has been 40 per cent increase in homicides related to drugs, and that HIV infection related to intravenous drug use were by 2005 the third highest in Europe.But there is another rather fundamental problem with the Royal Society for Public Health’s argument. Britain only has a punitive drugs policy in theory. In practice, we have a softer attitude even than decriminalised Portugal. Theoretically, you can get a 7-year sentence for possession of class A drugs like heroin and crack cocaine, and five years for possession of a class B drug like cannabis. Yet in practice, British drug users can, by and large, snort and smoke with impunity. A freedom of information request in 2011 revealed that only 554 people were in jail for drug possession, and a further 3501 for possession with intent to supply. Even Harry Hendron, the barrister recently convicted of supplying drugs which killed his 18-year-old Columbian boyfriend has not been sent to jail, but was given a community sentence instead.http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/crime/11197559/Drug-laws-around-the-world-does-anyone-get-it-right.html Get hooked on opiates, and the British state will even fix you up with methadone for free. There are now 140,000 state-sponsored methadone users, each of them costing taxpayers £3,000 a year. Is that really a ‘punitive’ policy?British drug-users wouldn’t like the Portuguese regime – where, contrary to what some try to imply, drugs remain illegal. Those caught with drugs are hauled before a ‘commission for the dissuasion of drug addiction’. They may not get a criminal record but they can be fined, placed on a compulsory treatment programme, or even have their passport confiscated. I only wish we used such firm measures.The pro-drug lobby likes to quote Portugal at us not because it wants Britain to copy what Portugal has done but because it counts on us not knowing what actually happens to drug-users in Portugal and hopes that, like the Times headline did on Thursday, we will confuse the words ‘decriminalised’ with ‘made legal’. The latter is what metropolitan liberals really want, not because they are especially concerned with the health of drug addicts on distant council estates but because they rather like using drugs themselves.https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2016/06/really-want-portugals-drug-laws/#Decriminalisation Of Drugs In Portugal Was Not A Success, Says Dr Manuel Pinto CoelhoHuffington Post 10 Dec 2012…despite his country’s policies being lauded, Dr Manuel Pinto Coelho, President of the Association for a Drug Free Portugal, says decriminalisation has not worked. “Decriminalisation in Portugal was not a blessing. Decriminalisation didn’t help us. It was decriminalisation that results like this? I don’t know. It makes no sense that people say since decriminalisation drugs use fell in Portugal,” he told The Huffington Post UK, citing statistics from the White House which show an increase in drug related deaths between 2004-2006 in the country. Dr Pinto Coelho argues that viewing drug attacks as sick means the line between dealers and consumers is blurred. “There is now in Portugal a trivialisation. It is more trivial then it was before. I’m not happy with this,” he said.“I don’t believe a society where people have addiction is part of life. There are people who are happy in the system, I believe in the treatment in the drug dependents and that it is possible to put a final part in their addiction. I believe that every system, every policy system, should have a final goal; life without drugs. I believe they can reach a life without drugs, I believe we have always to have to fight against cancer and poverty and unhappiness and hunger and drugs.” According to statistics compiled by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) between 2001-07, after decriminalisation, more people took cannabis, cocaine, amphetamines, ecstasy, and LSD – but decreased in neighbouring Spain between 2003-2008. “Kofi Annan said a very interesting thing – the eradication of drugs in our planet is a difficult task but we can go forward, we can go through it. Since decriminalisation in Portugal there was an increase in every single drug. In cannabis and cocaine and ecstasy and in HIV aids,” he said.READ MORE: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2012/12/10/portugal-decriminalisation-drugs-britain_n_2270789.htmllast_img read more