Café couture

first_imgCake companies were out in force at last week’s Caffè Culture show in London, hoping their exclusive delicacies would catch the eye of a passing Starbucks buyer.Caffè Culture, now in its second year, took place at the London Olympia exhibition centre, with 175 exhibitors, including Typhoo, Nestlé, Café Direct, Dairy Crest, First Choice Coffee, Love Smoothies and ProJuice, and a host of other food, drink, packaging, computer systems and distribution suppliers.Bakers among them included Clam’s Handmade Cakes, The Handmade Cake Company, Honeyrose Bakery, Just Cakes, Kate’s Cakes and Sugar and Spice.Caffè Culture was Manchester-based Martins Cakes & Desserts’ first trade show. The company, which already supplies customers including Debenhams, took a stand to target the big coffee chains, with products including thaw-and-serve artisan scones, in varieties such as rosemary & vine fruit and fig & aniseed. Development director Allison Pickup said the company is focusing on developing traditional British products, and can work directly with customers to make bespoke products.Bakery supplier Dawn Foods came to the show to launch a new generic brand ’Sweet Bakery Box’. Aimed at foodservice operators, the range includes cookies and milkshake muffins. Each product is wrapped individually and packaged in small cases.Among the other product launches at the show was a high-profile relaunch of Typhoo Tea’s decaffeinated tea range for the foodservice market and three new speciality teas, Assam, Earl Grey and English Breakfast.London-based chain Coffee Republic took a stand at the show to canvas potential franchisees. The chain now has 46 bars, 32 of which are franchises, said UK franchise director Kevin Frostick, and it plans to recruit new franchisees all around the UK.Caffè Culture also boasted a range of seminars, debates and demonstrations from industry experts, baristas and catering professionals, about issues facing the industry. The Caffè Theatre saw chefs and baristas provide practical food and latte art demonstrations, giving inspiration to those looking to offer new food and drink ideas to their customers. Meanwhile, business presentations from top names in the trade included Fiacra Nagle, CEO of O’Brien’s Sandwich Bars, and Phil Abbott, MD of the BB’s Coffee and Muffins chain.The show was certainly the place for the food-to-go supplier to see and be seen. nlast_img read more

A scarry story

first_imgWhen I speak for Credit Unions, I often tell a “SCARRY STORY”. Now you’re probably thinking that I misspelled “scary story” but I didn’t. I tell about the time when I was 3 years old and cut my chin open on our swing set only to cut it again a few weeks later in the same place leaving the scar that I have to shave around today. I then ask the audience to pair up and tell each other their “SCARRY” stories. Everyone has a scar and scars come with stories. So why is it important to share our story? Empathy.A few weeks ago I got a call from the manager of our local theater asking if I wanted to be in a musical. Someone had dropped out at the last minute and they needed a replacement.  I am not an actor, but I’ve often thought that I would enjoy being in a play and this was an opportunity to mark an item off my bucket list. I, therefore, joined the cast of the Broadway Musical “Be More Chill”. Had I done the slightest bit of due diligence, I would have discovered that, not only was I the oldest person in the play by 25 years, I had to sing in a robe and my underwear. I haven’t spent a lot of time around teenagers, other than my kids and their friends, and it was an eye-opening experience. Now that I was spending a few hours a night with a group of 15-20 year olds, I was finding myself pulling the same pranks I would have pulled when I was in high school. During one of the big dance scenes, one of the female actors drinks alcohol from a baby bottle. The bottle was actually filled with apple juice but it looked real. One night, a few of us were backstage and saw the apple juice baby bottle sitting on a table next to a shaker of salt. That’s when it happened. I thought it would be hilarious to put salt in her baby bottle. Funny prank right? Wrong. As the cast was singing and dancing on stage, she took a swig from the salted bottle and made a horrible face. Those of us who were watching backstage on the monitor laughed hysterically. After the scene she found out that we had played a prank on her and reacted very differently than I expected. I assumed that she would think it was funny and laugh it off, but I didn’t know her “SCARRY story”. As a child she had been bullied in school and actually had to change schools because of it. When we pulled a seemingly innocent prank, past feelings of being bullied reemerged causing her to break down in tears. I was stunned that a young lady so talented and confident on stage would have such a reaction.  The way we treat our members and coworkers are often based on false assumptions. When we allow ourselves to understand where others come from and are willing to hear their “scarry story”, we can show empathy. Empathy builds trust and trust is a foundation of loyalty. 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Patrick Henry Patrick Henry is an author and speaker from North Carolina. As a former Nashville songwriter and humorist on the SiriusXM Radio Family Comedy Channels, he delivers funny and entertaining keynote … Web: www.patrickHenrySpeaker.com Detailslast_img read more

Brazil’s Bolsonaro, long a skeptic, tests positive for coronavirus

first_imgFinishing the interview, he stepped back and removed his mask to reveal a smile, adding: “You can see from my face that I’m well and I’m calm.”Bolsonaro said he has been taking hydroxychloroquine, an anti-malarial drug with unproven effectiveness against COVID-19.Bolsonaro has emulated his political role model Donald Trump in voicing skepticism about the virulence of the virus, although the US president has moderated his tone. Bolsonaro tested negative in March for the coronavirus after several aides were diagnosed following a visit to Trump’s Mar-a-Lago, Florida, resort.The positive test on Tuesday looks set to spark a frantic period of contact tracing and tests for those who met Bolsonaro in recent days, including Economy Minister Paulo Guedes, lender Banco Bradesco’s Chairman Luiz Carlos Trabuco and planemaker Embraer’s CEO Francisco Gomes Neto. Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro said on Tuesday he tested positive for the novel coronavirus after months of playing down the severity of the virus and defying medical experts, even as the pandemic killed more than 65,000 people in his country.The right-wing populist told a group of television reporters that he had developed symptoms at the weekend.”It started on Sunday with a certain malaise and became worse throughout the day on Monday, feeling poorly, exhaustion, a bit of muscle ache, fever hit 38 [degrees Celsius],” he said. Topics :center_img Over the weekend, Bolsonaro was also in close contact with US Ambassador Todd Chapman during July 4 celebrations. Pictures showed neither wearing a mask.Brazilian financial markets retreated following the news. Brazil’s currency, the real, swung into negative territory and the benchmark stock index deepened losses to 1.5%.CriticismBrazil has the world’s second-largest outbreak behind the United States, with more than 1.6 million confirmed cases.Bolsonaro has drawn criticism from public health experts for fighting state and city efforts to impose social distancing, arguing that the economic damage of those orders is worse than the disease itself.He has fired two health ministers during the crisis, both trained doctors, and replaced them with an active duty army general on an interim basis.He joins a list of government leaders to become infected with the coronavirus, including British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez, both of whom were treated in hospital and needed extra oxygen.Pan American Health Organization director for communicable diseases Marcos Espinal wished Bolsonaro a “speedy recovery” but said his infection carried a message.”The message is that this virus is unpredictable and does not respect race, class or people in power, despite security around any president,” Espinal said. “For Brazil, the infection of its president should reinforce the need to strengthen implementations of social distancing recommendations and the use of masks to mitigate the spread of coronavirus,” he added.Bolsonaro has often defied local guidelines to wear a mask in public, even after a judge ordered him to do so in late June. Bolsonaro has also railed against social distancing rules supported by the World Health Organization.The US embassy in Brasilia said via Twitter on Monday that the ambassador had lunch on July 4 with Bolsonaro, five ministers and the president’s son, Congressman Eduardo Bolsonaro. The ambassador had no symptoms, but would undergo testing and is “taking precautions,” the embassy said.last_img read more

Kimberly Guilfoyle tests positive for Covid-19, Donald Trump Jr. negative

first_imgKimberly Guilfoyle, girlfriend of Donald Trump Jr., tested positive for the novel coronavirus while in South Dakota and as a result did not attend the Mount Rushmore event. She is asymptomatic and Trump Jr. has tested negative, according to media reports.Neither has been in direct contact with the president and did not fly on Air Force One.“After testing positive, Kimberly was immediately isolated to limit any exposure. She’s doing well, and will be retested to ensure the diagnosis is correct since she’s asymptomatic, but as a precaution will cancel all upcoming events,” Sergio Gor, chief of staff for the Trump Victory Finance Committee, said in a statement. “Donald Trump Jr was tested negative, but as a precaution is also self isolating and is canceling all public events.”Guilfoyle, 51, is one year older than first lady Melania Trump and was formally married to California governor Gavin Newsom.Trump Jr., 42, and Guilfoyle will be driving home rather than taking a flight, a source said.last_img read more

Saint Martin’s University’s 2017 Distinguished Alumni to be Honored at Homecoming

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Saint Martin’s UniversitySix alumni of Saint Martin’s University and High School will be honored with 2017 Distinguished Alumni Awards at the University’s annual Homecoming festivities on Saturday, February 11, on the University campus.Alumni are nominated, then chosen for the honor based on outstanding community service, professional achievement and/or service to Saint Martin’s. The University began formally recognizing its alumni of note in the early 1980s.“They have a lifetime of achievements:  personally, professionally and with Saint Martin’s University, and we are honored to have them as alumni,” says Cecelia Loveless, vice president for institutional advancement.Award recipients for 2017 are Paula Bouwer-Ronshaugen ’86, Bremerton; Peter Fluetsch HS’56, ’58, Olympia; Andy Hwang ’94, Federal Way; Ivan Lui-Kwan ’67, Honolulu, Hawaii; Abbot Neal Roth, O.S.B. ’65, Lacey; and Jim Swenson HS’74, Lacey. Here are some highlights about each of this year’s award recipients:Peter Fluetsch, HS’56,’58Peter Fluetsch is a successful entrepreneur, respected in the community and within his industry. He and his wife Kathy founded Sunset Air, a heating and air-conditioning, business in 1976. He has long been active in the community, including serving as mayor of Tumwater for four years. He helped found the Thurston County Economic Development Council and served several terms on its board, and for 12 years, was chairman of public works in Tumwater. His work on the boards of several South Sound nonprofit organizations includes service with the Olympia Master Builders, Washington Center for the Performing Arts, Knights of Columbus and the Providence St. Peter Foundation. He also has served as a bank director and as a board member for several industry-specific organizations.Andy Hwang ’94Andy Hwang, who graduated with a degree in criminal justice, started a career with law enforcement while still in high school, serving as a police explorer for the Thurston County Sheriff’s Department. Fast forward 30-plus years, and he is now Federal Way Police Chief. Hwang leads 160 employees and manages a $30 million budget, serving 93,000 citizens of Federal Way. Hwang is active in several professional associations and organizations: King County Police Chiefs Association; Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs; International Association of Chiefs of Police. He also serves on the boards of Woodstone Credit Union and Federal Way Advancing Leadership.Ivan Lui-Kwan ’67For more than 40 years, Ivan Lui-Kwan, a graduate in political science, has practiced law in Hawaii, focusing on land use, administrative and real estate law. He is a director of the law firm Starn O’Toole Marcus & Fisher in Honolulu, and has been recognized by the peer-reviewed publication, “Best Lawyers in America®” for administrative/regulatory law and government relations practice. He was named 2015 “Best Lawyers in America®” Lawyer of the Year in government relations practice in Honolulu. Lui-Kwan also was recognized in 2014 with a Lifetime Achievement Award from Pacific Edge Magazine. In 2015, he was a Queen Emma Ball honoree for his many contributions to the St. Andrew’s Schools and the people of Hawaii, and as ambassador for the United States to Maori King Tuheitia and the Maori Tribes of New Zealand.Paula V. Bouwer-Ronshaugen, ’86When Paula Bouwer-Ronshaugen earned her degree in community services in 1986, she was the first Saint Martin’s student with a hearing disability to graduate. She is employed as deaf services manager with Washington Vocational Services, a non-profit staffing agency, where she advocates for clients to potential employers who may have no education or knowledge about how to work with a person with a disability. About 80 percent of those with disabilities she has placed are deaf or hard-of-hearing; the remaining 20 percent have other disabilities.  For more than 20 years, Paula has been lauded as a top job placement specialist in finding employment for people with disabilities in a region that spans from Everett to Tacoma and from Tumwater to Silverdale.Abbot Neal Roth, O.S.B. ’65Abbot Neal Roth, O.S.B., has been an integral part of the Saint Martin’s community for 59 years, and has served as abbot since 1993. Abbot Neal was raised in Yakima and entered Saint Martin’s after high school. After graduating with a degree in secondary education, he continued his education, earning master’s degrees in both education and divinity. For many years, he taught at Saint Martin’s High School and College, as well as serving parishes in the Seattle Archdiocese. As abbot, he is the major superior of the Abbey of St. Martin’s, president of the Saint Martin’s Abbey Corp., chancellor of Saint Martin’s University and a long-standing member of University’s Board of Trustees. His faith in and commitment to the Abbey’s mission to develop and sustain Saint Martin’s University can be seen in the many University events he either participates in or officiates. For Abbot Neal, “The values taught at Saint Martin’s are the values that everyone should have: ethics, service and community.”Jim Swenson HS’74Jim Swenson, of Lacey, has served Saint Martin’s for many years through his work with the Saint Martin’s Alumni Association. He has translated the love he feels for his alma mater into countless volunteer hours spent working in the concessions trailer and the Capital Food and Wine Festival, both of which raise money for scholarships for Saint Martin’s students.Saint Martin’s University is an independent, four-year, coeducational university located on a wooded campus of more than 300 acres in Lacey, Washing­ton. Established in 1895 by the Catholic Order of Saint Benedict, the University is one of 14 Benedic­tine colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, and the only one west of the Rocky Mountains. Saint Martin’s University prepares students for successful lives through its 25 majors and seven graduate programs spanning the liberal arts, business, education, nursing and engineering. Saint Martin’s welcomes more than 1,243 undergraduate students and 277 graduate students from many ethnic and religious backgrounds to its Lacey campus, and 350 more students to its extended campus at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. Visit the Saint Martin’s University website atwww.stmartin.edulast_img read more