Expanding A Country Heart

first_imgNorth Carolina Singer-Songwriter Caleb Caudle Widens Sound on New AlbumCaleb Caudle might seem like a newer face on the Americana scene, but the North Carolina-based singer-songwriter, who’s now gaining some well-deserved widespread recognition, already has a deep discography. Caudle, who cut his teeth playing punk rock before becoming a hard-traveling solo troubadour, has seven albums to his credit, but noticeable critical fawning didn’t come until 2016’s Carolina Ghost. That record was an overtly country effort with vintage imagery and some well-worn heartbreak themes coloring Caudle’s honest, biographical lyrics. The follow-up, Crushed Coins, which was released in late February on the independent Cornelius Chapel Records, showcases broader ambitions.Sonically, Caudle, who recently moved back home to Winston-Salem after a stint in New Orleans, still fits comfortably in the alt-twang camp. The swinging “Madelyn” is full of fiddle-driven highway reflection, and in the earnest “Love That’s Wild,” Caudle’s Southern drawl is accented by emotive pedal steel, as he sings about romantic salvation: “I was a wreck til’ you came along/Stumbling home at the break of dawn/Now we fall asleep with all the lights on.” But while writing his new record he went on a jazz bender, particularly investing his ears in Miles Davis’s In a Silent Way. He also enlisted a tight cast of backing musicians and producer Jon Ashley, who’s worked with Band of Horses, Hiss Golden Messenger, and the War on Drugs, and as a result, the record finds Caudle taking tasteful steps into indie experimentation.“I was a wreck til’ you came along/Stumbling home at the break of dawn/Now we fall asleep with all the lights on.”Opener “Lost Without You,” another tune sincerely praising the love of a good woman, drifts patiently through a dreamy folk landscape with cosmic guitar fills and ethereal backing vocals that hover above the song’s acoustic base. “Empty Arms” is more energetic—a pulsing dose of gospel-rock laced with Mellotron accents and necessarily scuffed with a fuzzy, freewheeling electric solo from ace guitarist Megan McCormick, who impressively works her fretboard throughout the album.Whether he’s sticking to the roots playbook or finding ways to branch out, Caudle’s voice always remains sturdy and clear (think Lyle Lovett or Jackson Browne). It’s his best asset when he’s tackling tear-jerking subjects. In the dusty dirge “Six Feet from the Flowers,” the main character poignantly laments the loss of a spouse. Barely in his 30s, Caudle may be feeling musically restless, but his lyrics have a classic heart, filled with wisdom well beyond his years. Caleb Caudle will perform at the Evening Muse in Charlotte, N.C. (March 8) and at Eddie’s Attic in Decatur, Ga. (March 10).last_img read more

Altice Completes Its Takeover of Cablevision

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York European-based media mega-giant Altice N.V. announced Tuesday that it has completed its purchase of Bethpage-based Cablevision Systems Corp., which owns Newsday, amNewYork and News 12, for $17.7 billion.Altice made its initial offer to acquire the company on Sept. 16, 2015, estimating that the sale would go through by the second quarter of this year after getting the required regulatory approval. In May, the Federal Communications Commission ruled that the deal “serves the public interest.” Last week the New York State Public Service commission approved the purchase with conditions that it estimated could provide $243 million in benefits to New York consumers.By combining Cablevision’s 3.1 million customers in the tri-state region and the nearly 1.5 million customers of Suddenlink Communications, the St. Louis, Missouri-based company that Altice acquired last December for $9.1 billion, Altice USA becomes the fourth largest cable operator in the U.S.Billionaire tycoon Patrick Drahi, who founded Altice in 2002, said the Cablevision acquisition was “a crucial step” to the company’s growth.“We are very excited about our U.S. business and the opportunities we see in this market,” Drahi said in a statement. “We will accelerate network investments and bring innovative products and services to U.S. customers by leveraging our global operational expertise, scale and resources.”He had kind words to say about Cablevision’s now former owners, the Dolans.“I wish to also thank the Dolan family for entrusting us with their life’s work at Cablevision, where they have developed under their pioneering stewardship one of America’s pre-eminent cable operations with best-in-class management talent.”Wait a minute: Considering on online MBA? There’s many benefits to pursuing a master’s in business administration online rather than the traditional in-class settingDrahi’s favorable sentiments about Cablevision’s employees were echoed by Dexter Goei, president of Altice N.V., and chairman and chief executive officer of Altice USA.“Our very talented employees have great energy and enthusiasm,” Goei said in a statement, “and we are confident that altogether we will help to build Altice USA to the benefit of our customers and the local communities that we serve.”Naming its new executive leadership team, Altice USA said that Patrick Dolan would remain head of News 12 Networks.MORE: There’s nothing like summer on Long Island. Here’s a list of this year’s summer fairs and festivals“To meet our customers’ content and information needs, the company through News 12 also offers hyper-local news and programming created specifically for the communities we serve,” said the new company in its press release.There was no comment about the fate of Newsday, despite requests.The sale doesn’t include Madison Square Garden Co., which under the umbrella of MSG Sports, owns the New York Knicks, New York Rangers and New York Liberty.last_img read more