Helping heal survivors

first_imgFor nearly 30 years, Dr. Richard F. Mollica has been helping people cope with the worst catastrophes imaginable. The longtime director of the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma at Massachusetts General Hospital has worked with survivors of the brutal Pol Pot regime in Cambodia, 9/11 in New York, and, most recently, the earthquake in Haiti. Despite witnessing so much tragedy – or perhaps because of it – Dr. Mollica is an optimistic man. He has watched people recover from torture, loss of family members, and, what he considers the worst possible tragedy: the disappearance of loved ones. Like you, he feels empathy for the people of Haiti – but he doesn’t want you to feel too much.http://www.boston.com/news/health/articles/2010/03/01/dr_richard_f_mollica_focuses_on_psychology_following_disaster/last_img read more

How a new member experience revived an old online application

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The member experience is a powerful motivator. According to recent statistics, nearly 75% of respondents identify experience as an important factor in purchasing decisions and 65% say a positive experience is more influential than great advertising. Research from Walker says experience is on track to overtake price and product as the key brand differentiator by next year.Michigan State University Federal Credit Union($4.2B, East Lansing, MI) aims to build a positive member experience by meeting, and exceeding, its members’ expectations. To do that might require introducing new products or services to meet new needs, but in the case of its online new membership application, MSUFCU knew an update was necessary.“We last touched it in 2010,” says Sam Amburgey, MSUFCU’s chief information officer. “We needed to revise it.” continue reading »last_img read more

Maximize your lending success

first_imgLending can make or break a credit union—especially during a recession. Attend NAFCU’s Virtual Lending Conference to learn everything you need to help keep your portfolio strong throughout the crisis, and even gain more loans and members. You’ll acquire the best, most innovative lending practices, ideas, and strategies—along with a comprehensive understanding of how to integrate them into your credit union—so you can push through the recession in as strong a position as possible. Attend to: Strengthen your understanding of the most up-to-the-second economic and regulatory data trends affecting your lendingGain powerful techniques for improving your loan quality, profitability and balances during a recessionDiversify your portfolio by harnessing best practices for boosting business lending, attracting younger members, and engaging in loan participationsImprove your ability to avoid portfolio bankruptcies and maximize your recoveryJump-start your loan marketing program with new strategies for overcoming a world with less branch trafficDiscover the latest and most promising trends in mortgages, auto financing and credit card paymentsGet lending’s best strategies and ideas so your CU can strongly push through the recession. Attend NAFCU’s Virtual Lending Conference.Register now for special virtual event pricing! NAFCU member: $1,649 now $599NAFCU nonmember: $2,449 now $799 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Coronavirus epidemic ‘far from over’ in Asia – WHO official

first_imgThe WHO does not expect any country to be safe, as the coronavirus will eventually get everywhere, said WHO technical adviser Matthew Griffith.”Whereas countries and areas in this region have shown how to flatten the curve, outbreaks continue to pop up in new places and importation remains a concern,” Griffith said at the briefing, citing cases in Singapore and South Korea from people who travelled abroad.The focus of the epidemic is now on Europe, but that will likely shift to other regions, Griffith said. “Let me be clear. The epidemic is far from over in Asia and the Pacific. This is going to be a long-term battle and we cannot let down our guard,” Kasai told a virtual media briefing.”We need every country to keep preparing for large-scale community transmission.”Countries with limited resources are a priority, such as Pacific Island nations, he said, as they have to ship samples to other countries for diagnoses, and transportation restrictions are making that more difficult.Kasai warned that for countries that are seeing a tapering off of cases, they should not let down their guard, or the virus may come surging back. The coronavirus epidemic is “far from over” in the Asia-Pacific region, and current measures to curb the spread of the virus are buying time for countries to prepare for large-scale community transmissions, a WHO official said on Tuesday.Even with all the measures, the risk of transmission in the region will not go away as long as the pandemic continues, said Takeshi Kasai, Regional Director for the Western Pacific at the World Health Organization (WHO).The new coronavirus first surfaced in central China in late 2019. Infections have now exceeded 770,000 cases worldwide, with the United States, Italy and Spain overtaking mainland China in confirmed cases.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Body of missing Fort Dodge man found in East Lake Okoboji

first_imgSPIRIT LAKE — The body of a missing Fort Dodge man was found late last night in East Lake Okoboji.The Dickinson County Sheriff’s Office says at around 11:53 p.m. Monday, deputies were walking the docks and shoreline near the Barefoot Bar when one of the deputies located an object in the water 45 yards from shore and 15 yards east of a dock.The deputies determined that it was a body and contacted the Arnolds Park/Okoboji Dive, team. Upon recovery of the body, authorities identified it as the body of 24-year-old Vincent Harvey who was reported missing on Sunday.last_img

The Tiger watch is on for final major of the year

first_imgWILL HE PLAY?–Golf fan Nevin Baker carries his daughter, Sophia, 4, on his shoulders as they walk past a photo of Tiger Woods at the PGA Championship golf tournament at Valhalla Golf Club Monday, Aug. 4, 2014, in Louisville, Ky. The tournament is set to begin on Thursday. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Joe LaCava walked nearly every blade of grass on the 18th green at Valhalla Golf Club, jotting notes in his yardage book after stepping off the distances from every edge of the green to every possible pin position. It was just like any other Monday at a major.The caddie just didn’t know whether any of this information would be useful in the PGA Championship. LaCava was awaiting word on whether his boss — Tiger Woods — would be healthy enough to play the final major of the year.“I’m optimistic,” LaCava said after he finished charting the entire golf course. “I’m hoping he plays. So I’m just doing whatever work I would normally do.”The caddie was at Valhalla. So was his car, a silver SUV parked in the spot assigned to the four-time PGA champion.As for Woods?Stay tuned. His agent, Mark Steinberg at Excel Sports Management, said in an email that Monday would be too early for doctors to decide whether Woods could or even should try to play this week after another back injury.The PGA of America said that Woods would not have his previously scheduled news conference Tuesday morning. It did not provide additional details.Woods took another turn toward an uncertain future when he withdrew after eight holes and one final shot Sunday at the Bridgestone Invitational. Before leaving Firestone, he said he jarred his back when he hopped into a deep bunker after playing a shot on the par-5 second hole from an awkward lie off the slope above the sand.“It’s just the whole lower back,” Woods said. “I don’t know what happened.”Making the picture look even bleaker was the timing. Woods had back surgery March 31 to alleviate the pain from a pinched nerve. The Bridgestone Invitational was only his third tournament since returning from a three-month absence. And there he went again, riding off the golf course in a cart, struggling to even remove his shoes before LaCava drove him to the airport for a flight back to Florida for evaluation.“Obviously, I feel bad for him,” Rory McIlroy told the BBC on Monday. “The game of golf really needs Tiger. He’s had a few withdrawals the past couple of years. I think the first thing is just to get fit and 100 percent healthy, even if that means taking the year off and coming back next year ready to play golf.”If he doesn’t play the PGA Championship, his season indeed would be over.Woods has to win the final major of the year to qualify for the FedEx Cup playoffs. He would have to win to clinch a spot on the Ryder Cup team. And by the sound of U.S. captain Tom Watson, he would have to play at Valhalla to even merit consideration as a wild-card selection.“Tiger would be a great addition to our team,” Watson told SiriusXM PGA Tour Radio on Monday. “I’ve said all along, I would pick Tiger Woods if he’s healthy and playing well. This doesn’t bode well right now. I just hope that maybe it’s just an isolated problem that he can turn around and possibly play this week at the PGA.”Watson said he watched the entire front nine and knew something was wrong with Woods after his tee shot on the par-3 fifth hole came up 65 yards short.“You don’t hit that terrible a shot ever — ever,” Watson said. “And I said, ‘Something is wrong.’”LaCava noticed it much earlier, when Woods hit a shot so heavy that it came up 30 yards short of the flag and into the water on the third hole.“I knew he was hurting when he fatted the one on 3, which he never does,” LaCava said. “He never fats them like that.”Woods kept playing, though, until grimacing on a tee shot at the ninth, slowly bending to remove his tee and calling for a cart to take him in. Why not stop sooner?“He’s tough,” LaCava said. “Tough and stubborn would be two good words.”Woods has not been back to Valhalla in 14 years, not since that high-charged playoff victory over Bob May that gave Woods his third straight major on his way to an unprecedented sweep of the majors at the height of his game. Woods was recovering from season-ending knee surgery in 2008 and did not play in the Ryder Cup.The course has changed since, with Jack Nicklaus making various tweaks, especially around the green. The par is now 71 with the second hole changed to a par 4. Otherwise, it looked to be in immaculate conditions on the first day of practice.Phil Mickelson, coming off a 62 in the final round at Firestone, played nine holes. The practice range and chipping area were crowded with players. McIlroy already was back at work, having established himself as the overwhelming favorite coming off his wire-to-wire win at the British Open and rallying from three shots behind to win at Firestone.Still to be determined is whether Woods would be able to join them.last_img read more